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Full text of "The Eckerd Concept: Bold New Directions - Catalog Edition 1975-76"

THE ECKERD CONCEPT: 
POLD NEW DIRECTIONS 



Catalog Edition 






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THE ECKERb CONCEPT: 
POLD NEW DIRECTIONS 



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If you are 

bright 

motivated 

able 

talented 

concerned 
Eckerd College may be right for you! 

If you are put off by 

rigidity 

being poured into a mold 

being a computer card in an impersonal system 
Eckerd College may be right for you! 

At Eckerd College, we realize that you have your own particular needs, 
interests, and potential. Our job is to help you make the most of yourself 
and your life — to sharpen your educational tools and give you the experi- 
ences you need so that you can decide your own direction, set your own 
goals, and move toward them with confidence and assurance. 

Your educational experience at Eckerd centers around our solid, rigorous 
liberal arts academic program, which is basically an intellectual experience. 
Academic work at Eckerd is demanding, exciting, and challenging; it will 
stretch your brain and make you grow. From this starting point, Eckerd's 
concept of bold new directions begins. 

Because you aren't the kind of individual who should be poured into a 
mold, we have designed a quality academic program that allows and 
encourages considerable flexibility— not only in selection of courses, but 
also in the development of your major; not only in the classrooms and 
laboratories, but in off-campus experiences that may find you interning in 
your chosen profession, doing research under scientists at nationally known 
laboratories, creating your own academic experience in a foreign country, 
working (for pay!) in a job you may wish to test as a career possibility, doing 
field work in a social welfare agency or at a marine biology experimental 
station, acquiring practical, "hands-on" experience that will be invaluable 
when you go on to graduate or professional school, or apply for a job upon 
graduation from Eckerd. 





Creative arts 

students working 

with the elderly 




As an example of the flexibility of the Eckerd program, look at what these 
students are doing: 

• A jungle station in Tshikaji, Belgian Congo. Three Eckerd College under- 
graduates — Charlotte Rule, Beth Grohman, Anne Kimball — are under- 
going a unique educational experience. Each is studying the Lulua tribe 
in light of her own interests: one from an economic-political standpoint; 
one in terms of the arts — art, music, literature; one in terms of family 
life. When each completes her written report of the one-month-long 
study, they will cooperate to write a final summation in which they will 
give their overall impression of the tribe and its future. 

• In Atlanta, an Eckerd junior. Bob Powell — interning under the Atlanta 
Bureau Chief of Newsweek magazine — is learning news magazine 
reporting by serving as a legman for a nationally prominent publication. 

• At the Pinellas County Therapy Halfway House, Ronnie Lawn, another 
Eckerd junior, is participating in a "live-in" field experience, counseling 
juveniles who have made a mistake in life. 

• To explore career opportunities in social service, Susan Dodge (a sopho- 
more majoring in social psychology) is working at the Florida United 
Methodist Children's Home. Because this experience is part of the Eckerd 
College Cooperative Education program, Susan is earning a salary while 
she is firming up her career decision. 

• In the Planning Department of the City of St. Petersburg, Maurice Kurtz 
is gaining firsthand experience in one aspect of city management. 

• Cliff Johnson and his Mentor are sitting in a faculty office talking about 
museums. They have just finished tailoring a special "major" in museum 
curatorship for Cliff. By choosing judiciously from courses in manage- 
ment, art, and anthropology — and planning an internship in an art 
museum — the program will meet all the professional prerequisites for 
graduate work. 

• In Virginia, Elizabeth Hall is serving an apprenticeship under Francis K. 
Terrell, well known craftsman in weaving and tapestry. As yet, Elizabeth 
isn't sure whether she'll put her skills to work as an art therapist or 
whether she'll become a one-woman entrepreneur in arts and crafts. 



Video taping 
a field experience 




Bold new directions in higher education! In a few words, that's what the 
Eckerd College experience is all about. 




Field study in the 
Florida Everglades 




Throughout this exciting educational program, the college has built 
personal growth opportunities for you to develop your own value system, 
a philosophy of living tailored to your own temperament and talents, a 
philosophy that will be yours as long as you live. 

Needless to say, such an education isn't for everyone. It's for the student 
who wants to test a situation rather than take the word of a textbook. It's 
for the student who has the initiative and imagination to want to strike out 
in a bold new direction to supplement traditional studies. It's for the 
student who wants to work with — not under — a professor who is a student 
as well as a scholar. It's for the person who wants to "put it all together" 
in preparation for a useful, rewarding life. 

"But," you may ask, "what becomes of students who have experienced 
bold new directions at Eckerd?" 

• David Rankin, a senior on Eckerd's championship soccer team in 1974, 
has a major in American studies and is now enrolled in law school at the 
University of Florida. (More than 60 percent of Eckerd's graduates have 
completed or are now engaged in graduate or professional studies.) 

• David Cotts and Stan Bower will graduate this year with majors in 
chemistry, and both have been accepted by the graduate school of 
Indiana University. Dave has done his research and thesis on photo- 
chemistry; Stan, a veteran of two years in Vietnam, has concentrated on 
organic research. 

• Fritz Russ, a 1966 graduate, majored in economics, and also studied 
cryptography and cryptanalysis. He earned his Ph.D. at Carnegie-Mellon, 
teaches at the University of North Carolina, and has co-authored a 
college-level textbook, Business. His younger brother graduated from 
Eckerd, and two sisters are currently enrolled. 

• Joyce Miller, a 1970 graduate who majored in psychology and also 
explored Greek and Roman thought during a winter term, is studying 
law at Harvard. 



Weaving apprenticeship 



Karen Heidner, who graduated in 1974 in management, took her intern- 
ship with the president of Eckerd College in college management and is 
now in the executive training program of a large department store chain. 
Her sister is currently enrolled at Eckerd. 





Dwight Bozetnan graduated in 1964 with honors as a sociology major, 
received his B.D. at Union Seminary (New York) and his Ph.D. in religion 
at Duke. He is an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church. 
Randy Ranson, current president of Eckerd's Alumni Council, graduated 
in 1965 in political science and earned his law degree at Vanderbilt. 
Jane Arbuckle graduated in 1968 in biology, and also participated in a 
Theatre Workshop. She's now a physician, having earned an M.D. from 
Hershey Medical Center of the Pennsylvania State University. (Six out of 
seven Eckerd pre-med students who have a strong record, good MCAT 
scores, and good recommendations, are accepted by medical schools.) 

Laura Lee Thompson, who graduated in 1974 with honors, designed her 
major in interdisciplinary science. She also pursued an independent 
study project on photography while she was at Eckerd. She is now 
studying for her M.D. at Tulane Medical School. 

Paul Shaum, a 1971 graduate who majored in management, included a 
seminar in Mexico in his Eckerd studies. He completed his graduate 
study at the Vanderbilt School of Management and is now a southern 
representative for Bankers' Trust Co. of New York. 
' Kathy Meacham graduated with honors as a religion major in 1972 and 
received the Miller Community Service Award, one of the highest 
honors given at Eckerd. She earned her M.A. at Harvard and now works 
with the General Executive Board, Presbyterian Church, U.S., developing 
new programs for young people. 




A summary of alumni successes could easily fill a book, but from this 
sampling you can see that the Eckerd graduate puts his college experience 
to excellent use and is making (or preparing to make) a sizable contribution 
to his profession and his community. 




Students snack at 
professor's home 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM AT ECKERD 

From the day Eckerd College (then known as Florida Presbyterian College) 
opened its doors, it has earned a reputation for heading in bold new 
directions as an institution — and for opening bold new directions in 
learning to its students. 

Continuously, the College has looked for superior methods of educating 
its students. As evidenced by the fact that Eckerd recently was rated in the 
top 10% of American colleges and universities, Eckerd has never sought 
such methods just for the sake of being "different." Each innovation tested 
had to prove that it was superior to more traditional methods of teaching 
before it became part of the academic program. For example, in reading 
other college literature, you probably have come across such expressions 
as "4-1-4," "winterim," "miniterm," "interim," or "winter term." (All of 
them mean essentially the same thing: separating the two terms of an 
academic year with a one-month period of independent study.) The 
winter term is an Eckerd concept. This innovation was created and tested 
first on the Eckerd College campus; then other colleges found it so exciting 
that they adopted it. 

Since the creation of the winter term in 1960, Eckerd has discovered and 
implemented even more innovative ways of teaching. Perhaps the best way 
of providing you with an understanding of the Eckerd experience is to 
take you on a "verbal tour" of the academic program. 

The Mentor 

Shortly after you have been accepted as an Eckerd student, you will receive 
material about selection of a "Mentor." Because you've read Homer, you 
know that our choice of this title is deliberate. The original Mentor was 
the guide and companion of Odysseus. As you are, in a sense, embarking 
on your own odyssey, it is only fitting that you have your own Mentor. 

Throughout your career at Eckerd, you will have continuing support and 
counsel from a faculty Mentor, who is more than the conventional "faculty 
advisor." Mentors are faculty members who have been specially trained 
to help you in your academic program, career planning, and personal 
growth. You choose your own Mentor before you enter Eckerd, from a 
descriptive list of Mentors and projects. In your freshman year you will take 





Freshman Modular Calendar — 1975-76 



a 



Academic 
Project and 
Orientation 

and 
Exploration 



Module I 
7 weeks 
Sept. 15- 
Oct. 30 



Module II 

7 weeks 



C 



Module III Module IV 
7 weeks 7 weeks 

Feb. 3- Mar. 30- 

Mar. 19 May 20 




Foundations Modes of 
Seminar* Learning 

y ^ 


Elective 


Elective 


. A ) 



* Ordinarily with same Mentor 



at least one course from your Mentor, and together you will work out the 
rest of your academic program for the first academic year. 
When you become an upperclassman, you will choose a new Mentor — a 
specialist in your area of academic concentration. The two of you will 
continue to plan your academic program, including independent and 
directed studies, internships, off-campus programs, work experience, career 
planning, foreign study, and the many other options that Eckerd offers. 



Student talks with 

student resident 

advisor 




The Autumn Term 

You will start your Eckerd experience in the latter part of August, when you 
report for autumn term. The traditional phrase for this experience is 
"freshman orientation" — but autumn term is deeper, wider, longer, and 
much more significant than "orientation." 

Autumn term lasts three weeks. It is designed for freshmen only, and 
provides an intensive foretaste of college living and college academic work. 
During autumn term you will take one academic project, for credit, from 
your Mentor. This project is stimulating in content, teaches basic academic 
skills, and focuses on the interdisciplinary nature of learning. The course 
will give you a clear idea of what is expected of you at Eckerd. 
You will learn about living in the college community from the student 
Resident Advisor in your dormitory, who is on hand during autumn term 
to help you make the transition into college life. By the time the upper- 
classmen return in September, you will be well established in campus life. 

The Modular Calendar 

In testing its winter term over a decade ago, Eckerd discovered that the 
traditional academic calendar (two semesters broken up by several short 
vacation periods and one long summer vacation) isn't necessarily the best 
calendar for all subjects or students. Now Eckerd has moved on to a pattern 
for the academic year that splits each semester into two seven-week 
modules, and adds almost a month of special projects for freshmen 
(autumn term), while retaining winter term. Freshmen are not required to 
take winter term (January) because they have completed autumn term. 

During the three-week autumn term and the four-week winter term, you 
will take only one academic project. In each of the two seven-week 
modules of the fall term and spring term, most students take two courses. 




^ 



By splitting the semesters into seven-week modules, and asking you to take 
only two courses during each module, Eckerd gives you a chance to con- 
centrate more fully on the material and methods you are studying, and 
to get more from them. About half of all Eckerd courses are offered in the 
more intensive seven-week modules; others require the full semester (14 
weeks), depending upon which time period is better for your learning and 
for presentation of the subject matter. 

The modular calendar also provides more points of entry in the academic 
schedule. You may want to take some time for independent study, foreign 
study, an off-campus project, work experience, or to replenish your 
finances. The Eckerd program gives you a choice of time spans in which 
to do so% the month-long winter term, the seven-week module, the 14-week 
term, or the entire academic year. 

The Values Sequence 

In each of your four years at Eckerd, you will participate in the Values 
Sequence, an essential part of education at Eckerd because the knowledge 
and understanding you acquire in this course will be an essential part of 
you for the rest of your life. These are the only courses required of all 
students at Eckerd; so you can see that you have ample opportunity to 
select your own subjects. 

The Values Sequence is an expression of our belief that one must educate 
the whole person, and that professional, career-oriented education is 
deficient unless it is placed within a wider context of thought. Values 
Sequence courses consist of lectures, small discussion groups, seminars, and 
individual study of written work. The series concentrates on helping you 
to understand yourself and your beliefs, and the beliefs of other cultures, 
so that you can learn how to evaluate critical issues of the day and 
eventually formulate your own value system, or philosophy, to live by. We 
feel that this is essential to the development of a truly educated mind as 
well as to a happy, productive life. 

In your freshman year, you will take Values Seminars that explore the 
Jewish and Christian heritages and examine the questions of the contem- 
porary world in the light of these traditions. As a sophomore, you will 
choose from seminars that concentrate on cultures other than your own: 
African, Asian, European, and Latin American. Your junior seminar will 






relate to your field of academic concentration. Senior seminars take up the 
practical issues of application of learning, career choices, and the total 
college experience. 

Modes of Learning 

Eckerd spends an extraordinary amount of time teaching you how to learn, 
for regardless of what your life's work may be, you'll advance further and 
faster if you know the fundamentals of learning itself. During your freshman 
year, you will be required to take two Modes of Learning courses, one 
from each of two different collegia. There is good reason for this require- 
ment. These courses teach you the skills you will need to assimilate more 
advanced work. You will learn how to think — analyze, synthesize, evaluate. 
You will learn how to get the most out of independent study and the 
various off-campus experiences you can elect in your last three years. You 
will sharpen your verbal skills — oral and written — so you can articulate 
what you have learned. The Modes of Learning classes also are open to 
upperclassmen who wish to review these skills or who wish to cross over 
into collegia other than that of their major field of interest. 




The Collegium Concept 

During the past few years, educators have become aware that the traditional 
division of learning into academic "departments" is not necessarily the 
best or the only way to give structure to the educational process. Newly 
popular among colleges is the "interdisciplinary" major, in which the 
student combines courses from two or more departments to form an 
individual academic program. At Eckerd, we have established interdiscipli- 
nary "collegia," which encourage new combinations of studies and 
demonstrate the interrelatedness of knowledge. 

The word "collegium" goes back to medieval days, when it meant a 
fellowship of equals (i.e., persons communicating without artificial obstacles 
to discourse) pursuing a common objective (which in Eckerd's case is 
learning). The word vividly describes what we're trying to do: to bring you 
(the student) together with a highly knowledgeable person (the professor) 
in an atmosphere where you aren't restrained from debating freely, chal- 
lenging one another's viewpoints, learning together. 

In a collegium, subjects are grouped according to the intellectual discipline 
required to master them. You learn mathematics and physics in similar 




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ways, for example; but you learn dance differently, and a foreign language 
in still another way. 

Each Eckerd faculty member chooses to affiliate with a particular collegium, 
depending upon his approach to his subject. You will do the same. At the 
end of your freshman year you will focus upon a major area of concentra- 
tion (a term with broader implications than "major") and the collegium 
which best suits your perception of that study. 

In its five collegia, Eckerd offers 30 concentrations (or majors): American 
studies, anthropology, biology, biopsychology, chemistry, comparative 
literature, creative writing, economics. East Asian studies, education (early 
childhood, elementary, or secondary), environmental studies, French 
studies, Germanic studies, Hispanic studies, history, literature, management, 
mathematics, modern languages, music, philosophy, philosophy-religion, 
physics, political science, psychology, religion, Russian studies, sociology, 
theatre, visual arts. 

Of course, your concentration does not have to lie in a single field, such 
as history or biology. You can create your own concentration by combining 
those studies that will help you achieve your career or professional goal. 
For example, if you wish to become an environmental economist, you can 
combine economics and biology, thus creating your own concentration to 
fit your own goal. The collegium concept makes this interdisciplinary 
approach to learning a natural one that is easy to accomplish. 

Eckerd sees the members of a collegium — students and faculty alike — as 
partners in learning. Professors bring high expectation to the learning 
process; students are expected to become independent learners and 
researchers, able to take maximum advantage of their professors' strong 
qualifications. Each collegium has its own decision-making group, com- 
posed of professors and students, which gives students an important voice 
in the academic decisions of the college. 

The Foundations Collegium 

As a freshman, you will enter Eckerd College as a member of the Founda- 
tions Collegium. This program differs from the other collegia. It is devoted 
to learning how to accomplish independent, self-motivated study and 
thought at the college level, acquiring the background to understand 
humanity's search for values and meaning, learning the principal modes in 




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sharpening 
communications skills 




which the mind does its work, exploring various disciplines, and making a 
sound beginning in your own disciplines, if you have already identified 
your goals. The Foundations Collegium is composed of three elements: 




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Foundations Seminars. These are the first-year components of the Values 
Sequence, and they will be taught by your Mentor. "Defining Human 
Nature" in the first semester examines man in time and space, man in 
relationship with nature, man as a socio-political creature, and man as a 
symbol maker. "Search for Spirit" in the Module IV explores man's need 
throughout history to understand the transcendent, spiritual dimensions of 
his existence. In both seminars, you will be encouraged to plan your own 
approaches and to think your way through to your own conclusions. 

Modes of Learning. These courses — open to upperclassmen as well as to 
freshmen — have one primary purpose: to sharpen your learning capability 
in a specific field of study. You become proficient not only in a subject 
but also in the method or mode by which it is understood. For example, 
"Visual Problem Solving" gives you a systematic approach to working in 
the visual arts. There are 31 Modes of Learning courses divided among the 
five Collegia. As a freshman, you may take any two from different collegia. 

Electives. The remainder of your four freshman courses, one in each module 
(you also have a choice of semester-long courses), will be chosen from 
non-specialized courses offered by the five upperclass collegia. You may 
take anything you like. We can give you a broad sample of fields before 
you choose a concentration of study; or you may get right to work in your 
chosen discipline. Upperclassmen may take these electives too. 

In addition to their other purposes, the Foundations Seminars and Modes 
of Learning courses share the responsibility for teaching you the communi- 
cations and study skills that you will need for college. Should you need or 
want further help, Eckerd maintains a Learning Resources Center which 
offers training in Reading, Writing, Study Methods and Attitudes, and 
Speaking/Discussing/ Listening, as well as individual tutoring. 

At the end of your freshman year, you probably will leave the Foundations 
Collegium and choose an upperclass collegium and a Mentor related to 
your individual needs and interests. But if you still aren't quite sure of what 
your collegium or your concentration of study should be, Eckerd provides 
a special group of faculty Mentors, assisted by peer counselors (seniors) 



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and supported by the whole Career Counseling program, to help you to find 
direction while you take an academic program that will enable you to 
move into any of the five collegia by the time you are a junior. 

Foundations Collegium Courses: The Foundations Collegium courses, open 
to students in all collegia, vary from year to year. A sampling of the courses 
offered in 1975-1976 includes: 



Autumn Term Projects 

Photography: Science and Art 
Educational Recreation 
Uncle Sam's 200th Birthday 
Pageants and Puppets 
The Shadow of Time 
Masks in Ritual, Drama, and Play 
Utopian Behaviorism 
Theatre-Making for the '70's 
Opinion: Yours, Mine, Ours, 
Public 



The Scientific Work of Sir Isaac 

Newton 
The Sociology of Romantic Love 
Academic Year 

Communications; Writing Skills 
The Art of Oral Communication 
Inquiry and Human Nature 
Values and the Search for Spirit 
Fitness and Skills 



Career-Service Program 

A liberal arts education is no longer to be considered separate from the 
economic, social and political realities of life. With increasing insistency, 
employees and professional associations are asking career-minded students 
to relate fundamental training in liberal arts fields to long-range plans. 
Further, they stress the value of a solid liberal arts background for business 
or professional careers. 

Woven into your academic program during your four years at Eckerd — but 
completely optional — is a program to help you examine your career and 
professional goals. This program offers one or more of a variety of experi- 
ences—one-to-one diagnostic career counseling to assist in making 
decisions which integrate academic programs, career planning, and general 
lifestyle; internship and field experience placements which involve unpaid 
work experiences of observation either with a professional person or in a 
special social environment; cooperative education, a full-time, paid work 
experience of a minimum of three months; discipline internships such as 
teacher education, community studies, management; and placement coun- 
seling that will enable you to select either the appropriate post-graduate 
education or the vocational career that fits your personal aptitudes, desires, 
and objectives. 




^ 




THE COLLEGIA AT ECKERD 




The Collegium of Creative Arts 

The Collegium of Creative Arts is dedicated to your total development as a 
person and to helping you establish a base of knowledge and skills for 
lifelong learning. We approach learning as problem solving, requiring 
involvement and development of your perception, imagination, skills, and 
insights — a creative response. 

We offer an opportunity for a major area of concentration in visual arts, 
music, theatre (including dance), and creative writing, with emphasis on 
creation and performance. Learning is through the practice of the art, 
critiques, and development of skills in studio-oriented courses. The practice 
of an art is more than acquisition of skills, and you will be challenged to 
think about what you are doing, gradually forming a philosophy of your 
own relationship to art and life. 

Because there is an affinity between the fine arts and the arts of human 
relations, the Collegium has a Human Development cluster in fields asso- 
ciated with applied social sciences. We welcome students in humanistic 
psychology, applied sociology, and anthropology when their studies are 
pursued in the modes of learning with the Collegium of Creative Arts. 

The Collegium provides a stimulating, compatible environment for teacher 
education. Our program is approved by the Florida State Department of 
Education, and graduates are immediately certifiable to teach in 28 states. 

The quality of this program is well recognized, and offers certification 
programs in early childhood, elementary, and secondary education. 
A student from any Collegium who desires teacher certification may take 
work in secondary education while maintaining affiliation with the Col- 
legium in which he or she is concentrating studies. 

Among the most recent developments of the Collegium are new concen- 
trations in community studies and leisure and recreation. Both are in 
response to a growing need for professional leadership in these developing 
fields. The city of St. Petersburg offers unusual opportunities to work with 
people of all ages. There is a population of retired persons with whom to 
work in both fields, and gerontology is becoming increasingly important as 
the proportion of elder citizens increases throughout the country. 



COURSES IN THE COLLEGIUM OF CREATIVE ARTS 



Collegium Courses 

Art and Society 
Art and Language 
Philosophy & Film: Ingmar 

Bergman 
The Psychology of Consciousness 
Poetry & Values in Contemporary 

America 
Development of Creative 

Community 
The Art Experience 
Creative Listening 
Issues in Education 
Performance, Performing, 

Performer 
Visual Arts Senior Seminar 

Anthropology Courses 

Dramatic Ethnography (1976-77) 
Human Sexuality 
Anthropology of Religion 
(For other anthropology courses, 
see Comparative Cultures and 
Behavioral Science Collegia.) 

Art Courses 

Intermediate Drawing 
Visual Problem Solving 
Drawing Fundamentals 
Special Topics: Art Projects 
Media Workshop: Sculpture 
Media Workshop: Clay 
Media Workshop: Wood 
Media Workshop: Painting 
Media Workshop: Graphic 

Design 
Media Workshop: Photography 

as Image Gathering 
Media Workshop: Principles & 

Practice of Calligraphy as a 

Creative Art 
Media Workshop: Graphics 
Intermediate Studio Critique 
Advanced Studio Critique 

Community Studies Courses 

Community Field Experience 
(Apprenticeship) 

(For other community studies 
courses, see sociology listing 
under Creative Arts Collegium.) 




Education Courses 

Early Childhood Education I 
Early Childhood Education II 
Community Education 
Education Apprenticeship 

(1976-77) 
Methods of Teaching Reading 
Humanistic Education 
Elementary Education Methods I 
Psychology for Education 
Professional Elementary 

Education 
Pre-lnternship 
Professional Education 

Leisure and Recreation Courses 

Leisure and Recreational Studies 
Exploration 

Programming and Leadership in 
Leisure and Recreation 

Concepts of Leisure (1976-77) 

Leisure and Recreation Intern- 
ships Projects 

Literature Courses 

Literary Studies 

Critical Process (1976-77) 

Contemporary American Poetry 

(1976-77) 
Contemporary Fiction (1976-77) 
Eighteenth Century Poetry 

(1976-77) 
Romantic Poetry (1976-77) 
Senior Seminar: The Poetry of 

Eliot & Pound 
(For other literature courses, see 

Letters and Comparative 

Cultures Collegia.) 

Music Courses 

Comprehensive Musicianship I 
Comprehensive Musicianship II 
Seminar in Solo Vocal Literature 
Choral Literature and Ensemble 
Music Projects I 

Comprehensive Musicianship III 
Music Projects II 
Comprehensive Musicianship IV 

(1976-77) 
Applied Music 
Comprehensive Musicianship V 

(1976-77) 
Comprehensive Musicianship VI 

Philosophy Courses 

Ethics 

Philosophy of Social Sciences 

(1976-77) 
Marxism: Philosophy, Politics and 

Art (1976-77) 
Philosophy of Religion 
Analytic Philosophy 
(For other philosophy courses, 

see Letters and Comparative 

Cultures Collegia.) 

Physical Education Courses 

Principles of Physical Education 



Psychology Courses 

Psychology of Personal Develop- 
ment 
Humanistic Approach to Think- 
ing and Feeling 
Introduction to Clinical & 
Counseling Psychology 
Gestalt Theory and Practice 
Body Psychology (1976-77) 
Behavior Disorders (1976-77) 
Practicum in Peer Counseling 
Theory and Practice of Child 

Therapy 
Research Seminar in Humanistic 

Psychology (1976-77) 
Advanced Seminar in 

Croup Process 
(For other psychology courses, 
see Behavioral Science and 
Natural Sciences Collegia.) 

Sociology Courses 

The American Community 
(For other sociology courses, see 

the Behavioral Science 

Collegium.) 

Theatre Courses 

Movement as a Mode of Learning 
Theatre Arts: The Living Theatre 
Special Topics: Fundamentals of 

Film-Making 
Theatre Arts in Mass Media 

(1976-77) 
Theatre Projects I 
Dance I 
The Motion Picture: Directors 

and Genres (1977-78) 
Design and Technique 
Theatre Projects II 
Dance II 
Seminar in Theatre History or 

Theory: Third World Theatre 

in the U.S. 
Directors Workshop (1976-77) 

Writer's Workshop . . 

Advanced Composition (1976-77) 
Poetry Workshop 
Fiction Workshop 
One Act (1976-77) 
Criticism Workshop 




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Your education deals most concretely with a concern for what you do 
with your life, both for the limited time you spend with us and beyond. 
We take vocation seriously, as a central concern of any person. Vocation 
deals not only with how you earn a living, but with how you spend 
your life. 

Vocational dedication to creative personal growth and human service has 
led our graduates into teaching as well as into careers in the arts, social 
work, community services. 

Our faculty is richly experienced in the practice of what they teach as well 
as in teaching. The Collegium of Creative Arts is a genuine community of 
learning involving beginners, advanced students reaching professional levels 
of competency, and a faculty of seasoned, experienced practitioners of 
their fields and arts. 




The Collegium of Comparative Cultures 

The purpose of the Collegium of Comparative Cultures is to help you, 
through comparative study of major cultures, to understand something of 
the breadth of man's cultural achievements. A practical goal is to develop 
your capacity to adapt quickly and communicate effectively in the cultures 
in which you may choose to live, travel, or work. 

The Collegium serves both as a window and a gateway to the cultures of 
the world: a window for those who learn about these cultures in the class- 
room from professors who have lived and studied in them; a gateway for 
those who wish to visit these cultures after preparatory study on campus. 

The Collegium of Comparative Cultures has primary responsibility for the 
area studies courses which constitute the sophomore Values Sequence. It 
encourges academic work in foreign countries, and shares with the Col- 
legium of Letters the responsibility for providing the language instruction 
which makes foreign study fruitful. If you have a special interest in the 
languages and institutions of other cultures, you should plan your academic 
programs in this Collegium. 

Afro-American, East Asian, French, Germanic, Hispanic, and Russian Studies 
combining language and culture are offered. The introductory courses are 
taught in English and require no prior knowledge of the language of the 



COURSES IN COLLEGIUM OF COMPARATIVE CULTURES 



Collegium Courses 

Geography (1976-77) 

Principles and Practice of Callig- 
raphy as a Creative Art 

Political and Social Philosophy 

Excerpts from Chinese Drama 

Colloquium: East- West Encounter 
in American Religious Life 
(1976-77) 

Colloquium: Comparative 
Cultures 

Colloquium: Professional Ethics 
and Personal Morals 

Colloquium: Ideology and Social 
Change: Japan, India, and the 
United States Compared 

Anthropology Courses 

introduction to Field 

Archaeology 
Anthropological Experience 
Human Sexuality 
Anthropology of Religion 
Making a Mirror for Man: An 
Introduction to Anthropologi- 
cal Research Methodology 
(For other anthropology courses, 
see Behavioral Science and 
Creative Arts Collegia.) 

Area Studies Courses 

Latin American Area Studies 
Asian Area Studies 
Soviet Area Studies 
French Area Studies 
German Area Studies 
African Area Studies 

Chinese Courses 

Elementary Chinese (1976-77) 
Intermediate Chinese 
Advanced Chinese (1976-77) 
Chinese Literature in English 

Translation 
Essays in Chinese (1976-77) 

French Courses 

Elementary French 
Intermediate French 
Advanced Composition and 

Grammar (1977-78) 
Classical Drama (1978-79) 
Survey of French Literature to 

1600 (1976-77) 
French Literature of the 18th 

Century 
(For other French courses, see 

Letters Collegium.) 

German Courses 

German Conversation Through 

Film I, II 
Modern German Writers 

(1976-77) 
A Survey of Major German 

Writings (1976-77) 
German Conversation Through 

Film III, IV 



Advanced Composition and 
Conversation 

Introduction to German Litera- 
ture 

20th Century German Drama 
(1976-77) 

The German Novel (1976-77) 

Novels of Hermann Hesse 

History Courses 

The Rise of Russia (1977-78) 
Europe in Transition: 1492-1815- 

1914 
Revolutions in the Modern 

World (1976-77) 
Modern Russia and the Soviet 

Union 
Cultural History of Russia 

(1976-77) 
(For other history courses, see 

Letters Collegium.) 

Literature Courses 

Soviet Literature (1976-77) 
19th Century Russian Novel in 

Translation 
Literature as a Vehicle for Cul- 
tural Understanding (1976-77) 
Great Works of World Literature 

(1976-77) 
Chinese Literature in English 

Translation 
Life and Works of Hermann 

Hesse 
Life and Works of Franz Kafka 

(1976-77) 
Contemporary Latin American 

Literature in Translation 

(1976-77) 
Beauty and the Beast: A Study of 

Sex Roles in German Literature 

(1976-77) 
(For other literature courses, see 

the Creative Arts and Letters 

Collegia.) 

Religion Courses 

Nordic Religion and Icelandic 
Sagas (1976-77) 



Man's Search for Ultimate Reality 
Radicals, Rebels, and Rogues in 

the Judeo-Christian Tradition 

(1976-77) 
Religion in Non-Western 

Cultures 
The Study of Symbols, Myths, 

and Rituals (1976-77) 
Asian Religions: Indian (1976-77) 
Asian Religions: East Asian 
Christian Thought and Practice 

through the Centuries 
Religion in America 
Contemporary Trends in 

Theology (1976-77) 
Life Cycle Rituals (1976-77) 
(For other religion courses, see 

Letters Collegium.) 

Russian Courses 

Elementary Russian 

20th Century Russian Literature 

(1976-77) 
Intermediate Russian 
Readings in Russian 
Introduction to Russian 

Literature and Culture 
Life in Soviet Society (1976-77) 
Advanced Russian Composition 

(1976-77) 

Spanish Courses 

Beginning Spanish 
Intermediate Spanish 
Advanced Spanish 
Advanced Spanish Conversation 

(1976-77) 
Highlights of Spanish Literature 

(1976-77) 
Contemporary Latin American 

Literature in Translation 

(1976-77) 
Golden Age Drama 
Modern Spanish Drama 
Cen^antes (1976-77) 

Swedish Courses (Directed Study) 

Elementary Swedish 
Intermediate Swedish 
Advanced Swedish 






area. You may choose any two areas of interest to complete your Values 
Sequence requirement, or, if you are going to specialize in a foreign 
language, you may fulfill the requirement by language study. 

Familiarity with a foreign language is a normal expectation of this Col- 
legium, because language provides basic insight into other cultures; and 
language competence is required when a student concentration in Com- 
parative Cultures is to study abroad in foreign language speaking areas. 
Language skills are regarded as a primary means of access to other cultures. 

The Collegium provides intermediate-level work in language and area 
studies in a seven-week summer module abroad at the end of the sopho- 
more or junior year. The language course is essentially conversational, 
taking advantage of the "living laboratory" setting. The area studies 
course combines organized group experiences of lectures, guided interpre- 
tive tours, museum and historical site visits, plays and concerts, with 
individually-designed, faculty-approved projects for each student. 

If you complete this summer program, you may, on your return, focus on 
language study or any other Collegia! program. The Collegium also makes 
extensive use of foreign study in the winter term, the Semester Abroad, 
and the Year Abroad programs which have been developed through the 
Office of International Education. 

Comparative Cultures includes the fields of foreign languages (Chinese, 
French, German, Spanish, Swedish, and Russian), area studies, literature. 
Eastern and Western religions, and history. Graduates frequently consider 
careers in foreign service, teaching, interpreting, travel, religious vocations, 
or multi-national businesses and services. 




The Collegium of Behavioral Science 



The members of the Collegium of Behavioral Science are committed to the 
proposition that one way to understand man's behavior and his institutions 
is through the methods of scientific inquiry. "Folk wisdom" no longer will 
suffice. The urgent human problems of our times — hunger, racism, pollu- 
tion, overpopulation, crime, mental illness, etc. — are problems of human 
behavior and therefore must be solved through a systematic inquiry into 
the factors which influence human behavior. 








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^ 



Probing the 

mysteries of the 

brain 




The primary purpose of the Collegium is to develop the conceptual and 
methodological tools you need to begin to understand individual and 
collective human behavior. 




Much of the specific information you acquire is forgotten or grows 
obsolete. What you must carry away from college is an intellectual perspec- 
tive which will allow you to continue to expand your understanding of 
human behavior after you leave Eckerd College. The major emphasis at 
Eckerd therefore lies in the development of generalized skills of description, 
analysis, and synthesis, rather than on the simple mastery of information 
and theory. 

Each student enters the Behavioral Science Collegium by completing an 
introductory course in management, psychology, sociology, anthropology, 
political science, or economics. Three of these courses — "Introduction to 
Sociology," "Introduction to Psychology," and "international Politics" 
— emphasize the mode of learning of the behavioral sciences. Therefore, 
beginning students frequently enter the collegium through one or more of 
these "modes of learning" courses. 

Having completed one of these courses, a Behavioral Science student 
then must take either "Statistical Methods" or "Probability and Statistics" 
(offered in the Collegium of Natural Sciences). An understanding of this 
subject is essential. It not only prepares you for research; it also, and more 
importantly, prepares you to understand and work with the primary basis 
of knowledge within the behavioral science field you have chosen. 

Collegium facilities include a Human Behavior Laboratory and a Computer 
Room. The Human Behavior Laboratory contains videotape equipment, 
desk calculators, and two observation rooms with one-way viewing, all in 
a complex of eight rooms suitable for individual testing and for multi-group 
simulations. Many opportunities exist for participation in political or 
management simulations, observing children in a controlled environment, 
and testing individuals or small groups in behavioral experiments. 

In addition to preparing you for graduate school, the Collegium offers 
preparation for careers in social agencies, government, management, 
opinion research, societal planning, economics, banking, and other fields. 




COURSES IN COLLEGIUM OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE 



Collegium Courses 

Statistical Methods 
Research Design 
Colloquium: Public Policy 
Colloquium in Social Psychology 
Colloquium: Political ideology 
Colloquium: Utopias 
Colloquium: Managerial Theory 

and Practice 
Colloquium: Models of Mental 

Disorder and Treatment 
Colloquium in Applied Sociology 
Colloquium: Deviance and 

Disorganization 
Colloquium: Physical 

Anthropology 

Anthropology Courses 

The Nature of Human Adaptation 
Contemporary Pacific Cultures 
The New Archaeology 
History of Anthropological 

Theory 
(For other anthropology courses, 

please see the Collegia of 

Comparative Cultures 

Collegium.) 

Economics Courses 

Principles of Microeconomics 
Principles of Macroeconomics 
Intermediate Microeconomic 

Theory 
intermediate Macroeconomic 

Theory 
Managerial Economics 
Money and Banking 
Economic Development 
History of Economic Thought 
International Economics 

Management Courses 

The Managerial Enterprise 
Principles of Accounting 



The Dynamics of Group 

Leadership 
Group Leadership Practicum 

Political Science Courses 

International Politics 
Political Development in 

Modernizing Nations 
Comparative Political Parties 
The States in the Federal System 
international Conflict and Crisis 

Behavior 
The Politics of Poverty 
(For other political science 

courses, please see Letters 

Collegium.) 

Psychology Courses 

Introduction to Psychology 

Developmental Psychology 

Social Psychology 

Psychology of Personality 

Psychometrics 

Social Learning and Behavior 

Modification 
Research Seminar in Social 

Psychology 
Research Seminar in Personality 

and Interpersonal Processes 
(For other psychology courses, 

please see Natural Sciences 

and Creative Arts Collegia.) 

Sociology Courses 

Introduction to Sociology 
Social Structure and Personality 
Age and Generations 
The Family (1976-77) 
Complex Organizations and 

Bureaucracies 
History of Sociological Theory 
(For other sociology courses, 

please see Creative Arts 

Collegium.) 




Studying a 

professional paper 

on microfilm 




The Collegium of Letters 

The Collegium of Letters studies man's works in order to evaluate his 
particular activities within an historical context. Methods include disci- 
plined research, analysis, imagination and conceptualization, criticism, and 
synthesis. The Collegium seeks to develop an appreciation of the human 
condition and of man's essential freedom and dignity. 

Courses in this Collegium require the study, discussion, and evaluation of 
books, documents, letters, artifacts — all the ways in which human beings 
have communicated with each other and with posterity, using, wherever 
possible, primary sources for the understanding of man's historical experi- 
ence and his creative works. 

With the Collegium of Comparative Cultures, this Collegium shares a 
concern to provide for students a high level of competence in the use of 
their own and other languages, with special responsibility for developing 
an awareness of the importance of modes of conceptualization, principles 
of explanation, and the nature of verification of the intellectual disciplines. 

Therefore, Modes of Learning courses offer an introduction to the under- 
lying methods and conceptual foundations of knowledge in such areas as 
history, literature, philosophy, and religion. Electives courses are concerned 
with a broad spectrum of human culture, from English and foreign language 
skills to artistic, literary, and philosophical masterpieces. 

As a student in the Collegium of Letters, you may choose a disciplinary or 
interdisciplinary field of concentration. Requirements for the former are 
set by the faculty in the given discipline; requirements for the latter are 
worked out between you and your Mentor. Among the fields offered are 
American studies, French language, history, literature, comparative litera- 
ture, philosophy, political science, and religion. 

Courses in the Collegium are appropriate preparation for law school, 
theological seminary, or other forms of graduate study. Your career might 
be in almost any non-scientific field, because the Collegium gives you a 
broad liberal arts background that is fundamental to many kinds of employ- 
ment: teaching, government, travel and transportation, communications, 
foreign service, business, industry and commerce. 




COURSES IN COLLEGIUM OF LETTERS 



Collegium Courses 

Western Civilization 

The Nature of Man 

Science, Technology, and Human 

Values 
Colloquium: Justice, Law, and 

Community 
Colloquium :Mythological Themes 

in Western Thought 
French Courses 
Advanced Conversational French 

(1976-77) 
introduction to French Literature 
19th Century French Literature 
20th Century French Literature 
(For other French courses, see 

Comparative Cultures 

Collegium.) 
History Courses 

Art and History of Ancient Egypt 
Europe in Formation: Medieval 

and Renaissance 
The Foundations of 

Contemporary Europe: 

1815-1933 (1976-77) 
The Search for Meaning in 

History 
Art, Archaeology, and History of 

Meso-America (1976-77) 
History of England to 1714 
History of Modern Britain: 

1714-1970 
American Civilization 
The United States as a World 

Power (1976-77) 
The New Deal 
American Social and Intellectual 

History I 
American Social and Intellectual 

History II 



History and Appreciation of 

Modern Painting 
American Revolution 
Imperialism 
(For other history courses, see 

Comparative Cultures 

Collegium.) 

Literature Courses 

Literary Studies 

Literary Studies — Comparative 

Linguistics 
Shakespeare: Motley, Murder, 

and Myrrh 
History of Drama (1976-77) 
English Literature: Middle Ages 

to Eighteenth Century 
English Literature: 1800 to 

Present 
The Dramatic Moment: The 

Poetry of John Donne and 

Ben Jonson 
20th Century British and 

American Drama 
Literary Criticism (1976-77) 
Chaucer 
Milton 

Romantic Poets 
Modern British Fiction 
(For other literature courses, see 

Creative Arts and Comparative 

Cultures Collegia.) 

Philosophy Courses 

Modes of Philosophizing 
Logic and Language 
Basic Concepts of Measurement 
Philosophy of Science (1976-77) 
History of Philosophy: Greek 
and Roman (1976-77) 



History of Philosophy: Medieval 
and Renaissance (1976-77) 

History of Philosophy: Hobbes 
to Kant 

History of Philosophy: 
Nineteenth Century 
Philosophical Movements 

Symbolic Logic (1976-77) 

Science in the Ancient World: 
Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece 

Philosophical Ideas in Literature 
(1976-77) 

(For other philosophy courses, 
see the Creative Arts and 
Comparative Cultures 
Collegia.) 

Political Science Courses 

National Government and 

Politics in the United States 
Civil Liberties 
Constitutional Law I 
Constitutional Law II 
The American Presidency 
(For other political science 
courses, see the Behavioral 
Sciences Collegium.) 

Religion Courses 

Understanding the Bible 

Varieties of Religion 

The New Testament 

The Old Testament (1976-77) 

Biblical Archaeology 

Jesus in the Gospels (1976-77) 

Prophets and Mystics 

(For other religion courses, see 

Comparative Cultures 

Collegium.) 




^ 





The Collegium of Natural Sciences 

The Collegium of Natural Sciences has its primary focus on biological and 
physical processes, techniques of observation, and emphasis on experi- 
mental isolation and control of variables. The Collegium also includes 
emphasis on the study of pure and applied mathematics. Biologists, 
chemists, experimental psychologists, mathematicians, and physicists make 
up the faculty. 

The objectives of the Collegium are to provide you with a variety of basic 
skills necessary for thorough study in the sciences; to develop the concepts 
and principles of science and mathematics, not merely as ends but as 
useful tools for further study; to train your mind in the scientific approach 
and solution to experimental problems; to offer you a variety of options 
for concentration in order to fulfill your career goals; to give you an 
opportunity to explore the historical, philosophical, and ethical aspects of 
the sciences; and to give you increasing independence in acquiring 
knowledge for yourself. 

As a student in the Collegium, you may plan a program of study with your 
Mentor in the areas of biology, biopsychology, chemistry, environmental 
studies, mathematics, and physics. Such programs normally lead to graduate 
study, industrial careers, or secondary school teaching. Or, you may elect a 
program of study leading to a career in medicine, dentistry, or medical 
technology. Students interested in medical careers work closely with the 
Pre-Medical Advisory Committee and with their Mentors. 

An interesting interdisciplinary program offered through the Collegium of 
Natural Sciences is a concentration of study in marine sciences. Eckerd 
College is in an unusual position to offer you a unique opportunity to 
study and experience the sea firsthand, with over 1 V4 miles of shoreline on 
Boca Ciega Bay, a subtropical climate, and a proximity to extensive govern- 
mental and commercial marine facilities. The waterfront areas of the 
campus and adjacent lands are utilized in a number of courses, beginning 
in the freshman year. They are also used extensively in independent study 
projects, winter term programs, and thesis research. 

Some students have found opportunities to work with local agencies in 
studies of marine pollution and the consequences of over development, 
mariculture, and other areas. Other students have obtained temporary jobs 




COURSES IN COLLEGIUM OF NATURAL SCIENCES 



Collegium Courses 

Scientific Experiments for 

Children (1976-77) 
Process of and the Individual in 

Biological Investigation 

(1976-77) 
Pre-Calculus Skills (1976-77) 
Computer Algorithms and 

Programming 
The Process of Communication 
The Concept of Energy 
Earth as Ecosystem (1976-77) 
Chemistry, Man, and Society 
Environmental Problems of the 

Bay Area (1976-77) 
Electronics 
Astronomy 1976 
The Paradox of Color 
Introduction to Geology 
Mathematics for Liberal Arts 

(1976-77) 
The Oceans and Man 
Science, Technology, and Human 

Values (1976-77) 
Natural Sciences Collegium 

Colloquium 

Biology Courses 

Organismic Biology I: 

Invertebrates (1976-77) 
Organismic Biology II: 

Vertebrates and Plants 
Natural History 
Ecology 
Cell Biology 
Botany 
Microbiology 
Comparative Physiology: 

Interpretive 
Comparative Physiology: 

Investigative 
Genetics and Development: 

Interpretive 



Genetics and Development: 

Investigative 
Advanced Topics in Ecology 
Advanced Topics in Genetics 
Advanced Topics in Botany 
Independent Research: Thesis 
Biology Colloquium 

Chemistry Courses 

Concepts in Chemistry I 
Concepts in Chemistry II 
Introduction to Chemistry 
Organic Chemistry I 
Organic Chemistry II 
Qualitative Organic Analysis 

(1976-77) 
Thermodynamics and Kinetics 
Chemical Equilibrium 
Advanced Organic Chemistry 
Instrumental Methods of Analysis 
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

(1976-77) 
Biochemistry 
Symmetry and Structure 
Independent Research: Thesis 
Chemistry Colloquium 

Mathematics Courses 

Calculus I 
Calculus II 
Statistics with Computer Help 

(1976-77) 
Algebra 
Trigonometry 
Finite Mathematics 
Linear Algebra 
Calculus III 
Differential Equations 
Topics in Mathematical 

Economics (1976-77) 
Foundations in Geometry 
Probability and Statistics 1 

(1976-77) 



Probability and Statistics II 

(1976-77) 
Abstract Algebra I (1976-77) 
Abstract Algebra II (1976-77) 
Numerical Analysis (1976-77) 
Applied Mathematics 
Real Analysis I 
Real Analysis II 
Topology I (1976-77) 
Topology II (1976-77) 
Independent Research: Thesis 
Mathematics Colloquium 

Physics Courses 

Fundamental Physics I 
Fundamental Physics I! 
Fundamental Physics III 
Classical Mechanics 
Electricity and Magnetism 
Electronics for Scientists 
Special Topics 
Quantum Physics I 
Quantum Physics 11 
Independent Research: Thesis 
Physics Colloquium 

Psychology Courses 

The Biological Bases of Human 

Behavior 
Fundamentals of Psychological 

Research 
Advanced Topics in 

Biopsychology 
Learning 

Animal Behavior (1976-77) 
History and Systems 
Comparative Psychology 

(1976-77) 
Independent Research: Thesis 
Biopsychology Colloquium 
(For other psychology courses, 

see the Behavioral Science and 

Creative Arts Collegia). 



a 





on oceanographic research vessels visiting the St. Petersburg area. 

The modern science facilities of Eckerd College were developed primarily 
with the intention of giving the undergraduate firsthand research experi- 
ence. To achieve this purpose, the campus includes an excellent research 
library and such sophisticated laboratory instrumentation as: research 
quality compound, phase contrast, inverted, and dissecting microscopes; 
precision balances; polygraphic physiological recorders; electronic 
osmometres, salinometers, and oxygen probes; programmed gas chromato- 
graphs: visible, ultraviolet, and infrared spectrometers; radiation detection 
equipment, including liquid scintillation and gas flow counting; refrigerated 
high speed centrifuge; microtome; freeze drying apparatus, etc. As a 
student in this Collegium, you have direct access to this equipment, 
whether you use it for your courses or your individual research projects. 





Students check 
international 
education offerings 
with faculty 





In St. Petersburg 
four exchange students 
test a flotation bed 
for burn patients 



OTHER ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

Although Eckerd College Is an academic center, it doesn't confine you to an 
ivoty tower. Much of your education may take place abroad — or off- 
campus. Among the options from which you may select are: 

International Education 

Eckerd College believes that a liberally educated person should be at home 
in other cultures. We try to give every student the chance to study abroad 
as an integral part of education. The Eckerd-in-London Center is perma- 
nently staffed and supervised by Eckerd faculty members; we also are 
affiliated with the Santa Reparata Graphic Arts Center in Florence, Italy, 
Coventry Cathedral in England, and the City and Guilds of London Art 
School. Eckerd offers a variety of programs at these and other locations. 

Winter Term. Many Eckerd students choose to take their winter term 
projects in London, and we also organize projects in Austria, Holland, Crete, 
Denmark, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Russia, and South America. 

Module Abroad. The Collegium of Comparative Cultures recently initiated 
a seven-week summer module abroad, with intermediate-level courses in 
language and area studies. The program takes advantage of the "living 
laboratory" setting, with study opportunities planned in Colombia, France, 
Germany, Africa, Greece, and Spain. Travel costs are included in tuition. 

Semester Abroad. This is Eckerd's most popular foreign-study program, 
with opportunities in Florence for art students and in London for students 
in all areas of concentration. Semesters abroad have been offered in japan, 
and Coventry, England; others are being planned in China, India, Latin 
America, and the Near East as demand requires. The Semester Abroad 
program is offered without extra cost above the normal on-campus charges. 

Year Abroad. Through special arrangements, we can offer you the chance 
to immerse yourself in a foreign culture for an entire year, by living and 
studying in France, Germany, Spain, or other places in the world. 

Off-Campus Programs 

Exchange. Over 150 colleges in the United States now exchange students 
during the Eckerd-originated winter term. Under this program, you would 
change places with a student from another college on a one-to-one basis. 





. jrs; 






t^« K ■ 




Student teaching 
elementary 
school pupils 



^ 



Recently, Eckerd students have spent January studying languages in upstate 
New York, poverty in Appalachian Kentucky, Indians and Chicanos in the 
Southwest, and pottery in New England. The same system can be applied 
on a semester or full academic year basis. For example, there is an exchange 
with Kansai University of Foreign Studies in Japan. 

Field Experience Placements. This option gives you the opportunity to learn 
from an environmental situation new to you — for example, a rural setting, 
an ethnic community, a halfway house. 

Internships. Eckerd tries to find the specific internship that will be of value 
to you in exploring a career or professional possibility. Some internships 
are directly tied to a field of study — for example, in management or teacher 
education. Others are individual programs, based on what you and your 
Mentor think would be the best learning experience for you. Among the 
internships we recently developed for students are work under the Atlanta 
bureau chief of Newsweek, research on prison reform with the Florida 
Division of Corrections, an apprenticeship with a weaver in rural Virginia, 
work in a law office with a practicing attorney, a management experience 
with the Planning Department of the City of St. Petersburg, an opportunity 
to practice museum management in a fine arts museum. 

Cooperative Education. "Co-op Ed" places you in a full-time job with pay 
for a three-month span or more, and is designed to further your under- 
standing of a career. A physics student tried out his skills in an industrial 
setting; a creative writing student worked in a children's home to give her 
a better insight into writing children's literature; a psychology student 
took a job in a children's home so she could study the reactions of 
children — these are typical of the co-op opportunities at Eckerd. 



Student working 
with children 



Independent Study 

Independent study, on campus, is possible at any time while you're at 
Eckerd; off-campus, after your freshman year. You can plan a module or 
more of independent study, with a professor to help you set objectives, 
guide your research, and evaluate your work. You'll sign a contract 
specifying what you intend to accomplish in your study, how you're going 
to do it, and how your study will be evaluated. It is possible to do much 
of your college work by independent study, if you wish and if your 
academic program can best be achieved this way. 




Left: "Co-op Ed" student on job 



^ 





Directed Study 

Certain courses have been "packaged" by professors so you can take 
them without classroom participation by completing the work required, 
whether you are on campus or not. Provision for evaluation is included in 
your directed study course. 

Study at Other Institutions 

Occasionally other colleges or other educational institutions have highly 
unusual programs in one specific area. With many of these institutions, 
Eckerd has arrangements that enable you to share these programs for a 
semester or for a year. For example, one student spent a semester at the 
Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study atomic energy. Other students 
have gone to the Argonne National Laboratories (just outside of Chicago) 
where they have done creative research in the sciences under the super- 
vision of nationally known scientists. 

As you can see, the academic program at Eckerd has two prerequisites: a 
student who has initiative, talent, and the ability to plan; and a faculty 
that is teaching-oriented (frequently on a one-on-one basis). Faculty 
members at Eckerd are relatively young (average age: 43), but old enough 
to have had extensive experience. Over 85% have an earned doctorate or 
the highest terminal degree in their field. But as important as their pro- 
fessional qualifications are their attitudes toward students. Faculty are 
sought for warmth and for willingness and ability to communicate with the 
student. Throughout the college, there is an open door policy, and you 
are welcome — indeed, encouraged! — to stop in to talk with a professor or 
an administrator, whether your problem is academic or personal. To give 
you some idea of the closeness between professor and student on the 
Eckerd campus, it is not unusual to find faculty members participating in 
intramural sports: playing on a volleyball team, challenging you to a game 
of chess, sailing with you on one of the sailboats. 

Insofar as your academic program is concerned, there is one facility with 
which you will become intimately acquainted: the Eckerd College Library. 
The library collections contain 115,000 bound volumes, as well as other 
media of communication, including nearly 1,000 recordings and over 34,000 
items in microfilm. Approximately 7,000 volumes are added each year, and 
the library subscribes to more than 1,200 current periodicals. 




© 



CAMPUS AND STUDENT LIFE 



At any good college, learning is not restricted to the classroom. It is likely 
that as much learning takes place through student life as in the classroom 
or laboratory. 

Eckerd has attempted to provide unique learning experiences through 
its residence life, student government, and social interaction. The Student 
Affairs staff provides varied options if you wish to participate in and take 
leadership roles in campus life. Naturally, you are free to develop your 
own programs and opportunities for growth and enjoyment. Never are you 
coerced into the traditional arenas of having to "belong," but you will be 
encouraged to engage in any meaningful activities supportive of your 
learning experience. 

The City 

St. Petersburg is a vibrant city in its own right, and St. Petersburg, Tampa, 
and Clearwater together form a metropolitan area of over one million 
people with all the services and cultural facilities of any area this size. 

The primary focus of the area is on tourism, recreation, and retirement, with 
a fast-growing business and industrial sector which includes electronics, 
construction, medical and health equipment, insurance, and many service- 
delivery firms. 

St. Petersburg and nearby cities offer art museums, symphony orchestras, 
and professional theatre, in addition to road show engagements of Broad- 
way plays, rock bands, circuses, ice shows, and a full range of entertainment. 

The St. Louis Cardinals and the New York Mets baseball teams maintain 
headquarters in St. Petersburg for spring training, and there are major golf 
and tennis tournaments in the area. Southern Ocean Racing Conference 
sailing races are held every year, as well as many regattas for sail and 
power boats. Fine public beaches on the Gulf of Mexico are within 
bicycling distance of the Eckerd College campus, as are public golf courses. 

The Campus 

Situated in a suburban area at the southwest tip of the peninsula on which 
St. Petersburg stands, Eckerd's subtropical campus is large and uncrowded, 
with over 1 y4 miles of waterfront on Boca Ciega Bay and Frenchman's 




Eckerd chapel 



^ 





Residence hall cluster 




Creek. There are three smaM lakes on the campus, and the chapel is on an 
island in one of them. The 64 air-conditioned buildings are new (the oldest 
are only 13 years old), and were planned to provide a comfortable and 
efficient environment for learning in the Florida climate. Professors and 
students frequently forsake their classrooms and gather outdoors in the 
sunshine or under a pine tree's shade. Outdoor activities are possible all 
year; cooler days during the winter are not severe. 

Residence Houses 

Eckerd College has seven residential complexes, each consisting of four 
houses that accommodate 34-36 students. Most of the student residences 
overlook the water. Each house is represented in the Student Association, 
and each has a student Resident Advisor who is available for basic academic 
or personal counseling and general responsibility for the house operation. 
Residence houses are self-governed through House Councils. 

Most residence houses are all-male or all-female. However, five houses 
have men on one floor and women on the other floor, to provide students 
who prefer it with this option. Students are assigned to this arrangement 
only on request. 

Student Government 

Activities, projects, and programs developed and financed in the student 
sector are managed by the Student Association, whose membership consists 
of all full-time students at Eckerd. Each year, the Student Association is 
responsible for the allocation of student fees for various activities that will 
benefit you. 

There are four executive officers of the Student Association: the President, 
Director of Student Affairs, Treasurer, and Director of Student Operations. 
The legislative body is the Senate, composed of ten representatives elected 
by the student body in the fall and spring semesters. 

Athletics for Men and Women 

Intercollegiate and Intramural Sports. Eckerd College is a member of the 
National Collegiate Athletic Association, and plays a full intercollegiate 
schedule in men's soccer, tennis, baseball, basketball, and golf; women's 
intercollegiate sports are growing rapidly in basketball, softball, volleyball, 
and tennis. 




a 



Intramural sports are organized as competition between houses. The day 
students, non-residents, also have a team. All students are eligible to 
participate in the wide range of intramural activities, which include football, 
Softball, volleyball, basketball, tennis, pool, bridge, ping-pong, swimming, 
and chess. In addition, sports clubs have been organized around fencing, 
swimming, sailing, canoeing, and aikido. The McArthur Physical Education 
Center houses locker rooms, Physical Education faculty offices, two 
basketball courts, a ballet station, a gymnastic area, a wrestling station, four 
badminton courts, and three volleyball courts. The campus aso has tennis 
courts, an archery range, a swimming pool, and acres of open space 
where you can practice your golf swing. 

Waterfront Program. Eckerd's waterfront program is one of the most 
exciting recreational opportunities on our campus. We have a boathouse, 
docks, and hoist for our fleet of 40 boats, including canoes, sailboats, 
and power boats. If you own a boat, you can arrange to store or dock 
it here. 

To participate in any boating program, you must pass a 150-yard swimming 
test at the pool. If you want to sail, you must take a test to show you 
can rig and handle the boat. 

The Eckerd Search, Rescue, and Safety Team is a volunteer student group 
that conducts search and rescue operations and is responsible for enforcing 
waterfront safety. The team provides its services to the State Marine 
Patrol, Midget Ocean Racing Conference, Florida Ocean Racing Circuit, 
and to local intercollegiate regattas. 

Student Activities 

Eckerd believes that student life should be as full and rich as possible, both 
in the classroom and outside it. We provide a broad range of extracurricular 
activities — and if you can't find something that suits your interests, we 
encourage you to start a new group of your own. Your free time can be 
as interesting as you want to make it. 

Entertainment and Cultural Activities. The Student Operations Board of the 
Student Association sponsors movies, coffee house programs, dances, and 
concerts featuring nationally known artists, and is a co-sponsor of the 
annual Black Symposium. Films on topics pertaining to the academic 
program are shown regularly. 





^ 



The music, art, and theatre disciplines sponsor a number of events through- 
out the year. There are student and faculty recitals, programs from the 
concert choir and chamber ensemble, exhibitions by student and faculty 
artists, dance performances, and a series of plays produced by the theatre 
workshops. 

Eckerd's Free Institutions Forum gives students the opportunity to meet 
and hear distinguished leaders in the fields of politics, economics, business, 
journalism, government, and international affairs. Speakers often spend 
two days on campus, meeting with classes related to their field of expertise, 
holding informal discussions with faculty and students, and giving two 
lectures. Recent visitors have included Massachusetts Senator Edward 
Brooke, Israeli Foreign Minister Abba Eban, and anthropologist Margaret 
Mead. 

Student Publications. Publications are funded by the Student Association 
and fully controlled by the students themselves. Student media include 
WECR, the campus radio station; Thimblerig, the student newspaper; a 
literary magazine featuring art work, prose, and poetry by members of the 
entire campus community; a record album produced and recorded by 
students. Elections are held each year for the heads of the various media. 

Clubs. At Eckerd, if there Is enough student interest to form a club or 
honorary society, one is formed. Some clubs which have been organized 
recently include the Young Americans for Freedom, Afro-American Society, 
Organization to Study Racism, Lasker Game Club, and Management Club, 
in addition to groups built around special interests, such as the sports clubs. 

Minority Students. As evidence of its active commitment to recruit and 
encourage minority students, Eckerd supports a number of programs in this 
field. Special weekend visits to the campus give minority students who 
are considering Eckerd College a chance to view the college, visit the 
faculty, live in the dorms, and talk with other students. A dormitory serves 
as a study area, meeting room, and weekend recreational space. The 
Learning Resource Center maintains constant contact with students who 
need academic assistance and assigns to academic counseling student work- 
scholars with special tutorial competences. Upward Bound works to achieve 
maximum advantage for entering students and includes courses designed 
for high school students who plan to expand their experiences in an 
institution of higher learning. 




Station WECR 



Forum lecturer 
Margaret Mead 
ponders a 
student's question 




Chapel 
service 




Religious Life 

I ne tcKera college Chaplain is a pastoral director who seeks to nurture 
student religious concern, to stimulate voluntary activity, and to foster 
understanding of the Christian faith and the religious traditions represented 
in the college community. Eckerd College was founded by the Presbyterians 
of Florida and maintains a strong covenant relationship with them, its 
faculty, courses, chaplaincy, and voluntary activities express this concern 
of the college. 

Regardless of your religious tradition, you are encouraged to search the 
sources of your own faith, enter into fruitful dialogue with students of 
other faiths, use the institutional resources in personnel, courses, library, 
and informal groups to apply religious insights to your own life, and join 
in developing a true community life at Eckerd. We believe that difficult 
moral issues can be better resolved by college men and women in a 
context of revitalized religious faith. 

Career and Personal Counseling Services 

There will be times during your college career when you will want advice 
and counsel. Naturally, for academic advice the first place to start is with - 
your Mentor or with any of your professors — those persons who know 
you best. But you are equally welcome to seek the counsel of any admin- 
istrator. All doors are always open at Eckerd. 

Personal assistance is readily available in the Career and Personal Counsel- 
ing Center, should you feel you need extra stimulation toward personal 
growth or toward the further development of skills for coping with social 
or academic problems or for career development counseling. The Career 
Development Counseling Center offers assistance in discovering the type of 
work you want to enter after you finish college. 

Health Services 

Eckerd's medical service is directed by a qualified physician who is at the 
Health Center two hours every Monday through Friday. A registered nurse 
is on duty or on call 24 hours a day. Medicines may be purchased for 
minimal fees. Brief stays in the Health Center may be arranged for minor 
illness; otherwise, community hospitals are used. The college notifies 
parents when community hospitalization is necessary. 





^ 



ADMISSIONS AND FINANCIAL AID 



How can you become a part of Eckerd College? When you apply, we will 
look at such things as your academic performance in mathematics, science, 
literature, language, and social studies, your secondary school recom- 
mendations, and your scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test or the ACT 
Test Battery. We will also consider your intellectual potential for personal 
development and the recommendations from your high school. 

The Eckerd student body had a better than B average in high school, and 
scored above 1100 on the combined sections of the SAT. Seventy per cent 
of our students were in the top 2/5 of their high school graduating classes. 

If you are a student at another college, you can transfer to Eckerd College. 
You must be in good standing and eligible to return to the college you 
last attended. To graduate from Eckerd, you must ordinarily spend at least 
two years, including your senior year, at Eckerd or in an approved off- 
campus program. Exceptions are occasionally granted by the Provost. 

Students who have demonstrated exceptional scholastic aptitude, academic 
preparation, social maturity, and strong motivation, but who have not 
yet graduated from secondary school, may be considered for early 
admission to Eckerd. 

After acceptance, it is also possible to defer your admission to Eckerd, but 
by no more than one academic year. 

We strongly recommend a campus visit and interviews with faculty and 
students because Eckerd's distinctive program is best understood in the 
campus context. To arrange a visit, please telephone (813) 867-1166, or 
write the Admissions Office for an appointment at least two weeks before 
the date you plan to come to campus. 

Applicants must submit an application form, a $15 (non-refundable) fee, 
and transcript(s). Campus processing is rapid once an application is 
complete. A $100 deposit is required after notification of acceptance. The 
deposit is refundable until May 1, for fall-term applicants, and until 
November 1, for January or spring-term applicants. 

Costs and Aid. A college education of high quality is of lasting value and, 
like most things of value, is costly. A private, non-tax-supported institution 
such as Eckerd makes every effort to keep fees as low as possible. Thanks 




Admissions counselor 

advises student 



^ 




The Eckerd campus 
is a backdrop 
for sailboats 



to substantial support from donors, you pay only a portion of the actual 
expense of your education. 

Currently, the portion you pay in comprehensive fees, including room and 
board, comes to $4182 (1975-76). Day students have fees of $2907 (1975- 
76). Books and supplies will cost in the neighborhood of $150, and per- 
sonal expenses typically come to about $400. 

Accounts are payable at the start of each term; winter term costs are 
included with the fall semester. The handbook, Financial Guidance for 
Students, covers costs in full detail. 

Over 50 percent of our students receive some form of financial aid. This 
assistance is based on financial need and is usually provided in a package 
consisting of scholarship or grant, work aid, and loan. You can apply for 
financial aid by checking the appropriate box on the application form and 
submitting a Parent's Confidential Statement from the College Entrance 
Examination Board. For fall applicants, these should be submitted to the 
Financial Aid Office by April 1. 

In addition, each year up to ten freshmen — selected for outstanding 
achievement in academic work, creative talent, and character— may be 
awarded Presidential Scholarships. These merit scholarships provide $2,500 
per year ($10,000 for four full years) and are not based on financial need. 




Consider Eckerd. If you wish to strike out in bold new directions, the 
ideals and programs of Eckerd College can guide you, challenge you, inspire 
you, and help you prepare for the rest of your life. To join us, call or 
write the Dean of Admissions, Eckerd College, St. Petersburg, Florida 33733, 
telephone (813) 867-7766. 



Ch 





Catalog 



Section 




(h 



A FIVE-MINUTE RESUME OF ECKERD COLLEGE 



IN GENERAL: 

Eckerd College, founded in 1958 by the Presbyterian 
Synods of Florida as Florida Presbyterian College, is 
a coeducational liberal arts college accredited by 
the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. 
The name, Eckerd College, was adopted July 1, 1972, 
honoring Jack M. Eckerd, a Florida businessman 
whose financial commitments to the college have 
helped to insure its future. 

Location: On the outskirts of St. Petersburg, Florida, 
overlooking Boca Ciega Bay and Frenchman's Creek. 
The immediate metropolitan area - St. Petersburg, 
Tampa, Clearwater, Pinellas Park, Dunedin -- has a 
population of approximately one million persons 
and offers all the cultural, educational, recreational, 
and other resources of a major metropolitan area. 

Students: 925 total enrollment. 34.9% from Florida. 
38 states and 11 foreign countries represented. 
Student body contains representatives from all 
socio-economic, racial, ethnic, and religious back- 
grounds. Basically, a residential college, although 
there are some day students. 

Graduates: 40% enter graduate or professional 
schools immediately upon graduation from Eckerd. 
Over 60% of all graduates have completed or are 
currently engaged in graduate or professional 
studies. Six out of seven Eckerd pre-med students 
with good MCAT scores, a high CPA, and good 
recommendations are accepted by medical schools. 
Alumni represent hundreds of careers and 
professions. 

Campus: Two hundred and eighty-one acres, with a 
waterfront of over 1 Va miles. Sixty-four modern air- 
conditioned buildings. Three lakes. Unusual facili- 
ties include: Griffin Chapel, a church-in-the-round, 
which contains a forty-five rank Flentrop organ; 
Bininger Theatre for training and performance; 
private research laboratories for advanced science 
students; language laboratory; student-operated 
radio station and printing press; year-round 
swimming pool, sailing fleet. 

Accreditation: Accredited by the Southern Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Schools and by the Florida State 
Department of Education. 

THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

Philosophy: Highly innovative, societally-con- 
cerned, coeducational liberal arts with emphasis on 
practical experiences (where required by student). 

Faculty: Sixty-eight full-time professors (57 men; 11 
women). Eighty-six percent of faculty have either 
doctorate or highest terminal professional degree. 
Average age: 43. Student-faculty ratio: 14 to 1 . 



Library: Over 117,000 bound volumes, 35,000 micro- 
films and microfiche, 400 records; 12,000 
newspapers and periodicals. Microfilm and Micro- 
fiche readers. Special collections. Audio-visual 
equipment. 

Degree offered: B.A. and B.S. degrees. 
Collegia: The student pursues his study of'a major 
field by joining a Collegium, a group of like-minded 
scholars who view their subjects, however diverse, in 
the same way. 

The Collegium of Creative Arts concentrates on 
making and evaluating original works, and on 
creative approaches to personal, sociological, and 
educational development. It includes professors in 
art, education, theatre, dance, anthropology, 
sociology, philosophy, physical education, litera- 
ture, music, and psychology. A concentration in the 
Collegium of Creative Arts can prepare the student 
for graduate school or for a career as an artist, 
musician, composer, dancer, actor, playwright, 
teacher, social worker, poet, writer, anthropologist, 
or for many other fields. 

The Collegium of Letters studies, discusses, and 
evaluates books, documents, letters, artifacts — all 
the ways in which human beings have communi- 
cated with each other and with posterity. Members 
of the Collegium are professors of philosophy, 
history, literature, humanities, religion, French 
language and literature, political science, and 
classics. The pre-law adviser is among this group, 
and courses offered by the Collegium are appropri- 
ate preparation for law school or theological 
seminary, as well as other areas of graduate study. 
The Collegium provides a broad liberal arts back- 
ground that is fundamental to many fields of em- 
ployment: teaching, government, travel and trans- 
portation, communications, foreign service, 
business, industry, and commerce. 

The Collegium of Comparative Cultures is for 

students whose special interests are in the life and 
languages of other cultures, and it provides all 
students with the opportunity to live and study 
abroad. The Collegium includes professors of 
German language and literature, religion, Chinese 
language and culture, Asian and East Asian studies, 
anthropology, Spanish and Hispanic area studies, 
French language and literature, philosophy, Russian 
history and Russian studies, area studies, and the 
Director of International Education and Off-Campus 
Studies. Upon graduation, students may go on to 
graduate school or immediately enter careers in 
foreign service, teaching, interpreting, travel, or 
services and businesses that have international ties. 

The Behavioral Science Collegium seeks to analyze 
and understand individual and group behavior by 
using the methods of scientific inquiry: description, 



{D 



analysis, and synthesis. Faculty are professors of 
psychology, sociology, international politics, 
American political behavior, Afro-American studies, 
economics, and management. The Collegium offers 
preparation for graduate school or for careers in 
social agencies, government, management, opinion 
research, politics, societal planning, economics, 
banking, and other professions. 

The Collegium of Natural Sciences offers pre- 
professional training in medicine, general scientific 
fields, and mathematics-based areas such as 
electronic data processing and banking. Concen- 
trations are offered in biology, marine studies, 
botanical studies, biopsychology, chemistry, 
environmental sciences, mathematics, and physics. 
The primary focus of the Collegium is on biological 
and physical processes, utilization of techniques of 
observation, and emphasis on experimental isolation 
and control of variables. 

Concentrations [Majors]: Areas of concentration are 
listed previously under each Collegium. Most 
students combine several concentrations and thus 
create a configuration that satisfies their particular 
needs. 

Special Programs: Independent Study, Directed 
Study, International Education (study abroad), 
internships in many areas of concentration, medical 
technology program, co-op education, field 
experience in many areas of concentration. Winter 
Term Exchange (study at many other institutions, 
such as Colgate, University of the Pacific, 
Macalester, Wake Forest, and Hampshire College). 

OUT-OF-CLASS EXPERIENCES 

Extra-Curricular Activities: Complete range of clubs 
and organizations, including such unusual groups as 
the Eckerd Search, Rescue, and Safety Team (a 
water-safety group); Afro-American Society; Lasker 
Game Club; Management Club; Young Americans 
for Freedom; and clubs in fencing, swimming, 
sailing, canoeing, aikido. 

Student Government: In addition to being self- 
governing, students sit on many faculty-adminis- 
tration-student committees that determine college 
policy. Each Collegium has its own faculty-student 
committee that determines curriculum and policy. 

Cultural Program: Free Institutions Forum brings 
nationally known figures in government, business, 
journalism, international affairs, and other fields to 
campus. In addition, performing artists and art 
groups — dance, music, drama — appear regularly on 
campus. 

Volunteer Services: The metropolitan area provides 
a variety of opportunities for volunteer service, 
ranging from individual tutoring of slow learners to 



work with agencies in political, social welfare, 
health, juvenile services, etc. 

Residence Halls: Each residence complex is self- 
governing and has its own social program. 

Student Services: The college provides counseling 
services for academics (the Mentor system), 
residential living, careers, placement, health 
services, financial aid, personal growth. 

Athletics: Intercollegiate athletics (NCAA) in men's 
soccer, tennis, baseball, golf, as well as men's and 
women's basketball. 

Intramural competition in football, Softball, volley- 
ball, basketball, tennis, pool, ping-pong, swimming, 
bridge, chess, badminton, archery. 

COSTS/FINANCIAL AID 



Costs [1975-76]: 








Resident 


Non-Resident 




Student 


Student 


Tuition 


$ 2,845 


$2,845 


Room/Board 


1,255 


.... 


Student Association Fee 


65 


60 


Freshman Fee 


27 


12 


Total 


$ 4,192 


$2,917 



Financial Aid: Except for 12 Presidential Scholarships 
($2,500 per year) all scholarships, grants, loans, jobs 
are awarded on a basis of demonstrated need. 
Financial aid generally is awarded as a "package" 
that includes loan funds and jobs as well as outright 
grants. Need is determined according to the evalua- 
tion of the Parents'Confidential Statement or the 
Student's Financial Statement. Fifty-two percent of 
all students receive financial aid. Average financial 
aid "package": $2,509. 

ADMISSION: 

Selectivity: Competitive 

Average SAT scores: 1000 up (combined verbal and 
math) 

High School Class Rank: 70% of freshmen were in 
top 40% of high school class. 

Admission plans: Early admission, early decision, 
rolling admissions. 

Application Fee: $15 (non-refundable) 

Acceptance Deposit: $100 upon acceptance (refund- 
able until May 1 for September applicants; until 
November 1 for January or Spring Term 
applications). 

Transfer Students: Transfer to Eckerd as rising 
sophomore or junior permitted if (1) there is room 
available in the class, and (2) you are eligible to 
return as a student in good standing to the college 
you last attended. 



(1) 



CONTENTS 



Page 

A Five-Minute Resume of Eckerd College 2 

Admission 5 

Freshman Admission 5 

Early Admission 5 

Advanced Placement Program 5 

Transfer Admission 5 



Costs and Financial Aid 6 

Costs 6 

Aid to Students 6 

Thomas Presidential Scholarships 6 



Academic Requirements ^ 

Degree Requirements ^ 

Academic Credit ^ 

Program Options 7 

Majors 7 

I ndependent Study 7 

I nternational Education 7 

Off-Campus Programs 7 

Cooperative Education 8 

Pre-Professional Programs 8 

Career-Development 8 



Courses ^ 

Faculty 78 

Administration and Board ^^ 

Calendar 86 



d) 



ADMISSION 

Freshman Admission 

Admission to Eckerd College is based on past 
academic performance, achievement on examina- 
tions, and upon intellectual potential, special talent, 
range of interest, emotional maturity and potential 
for personal development. Applicants are expected 
to understand the statements of college purpose and 
commitment. An application to Eckerd represents a 
student's declaration of intention to contribute to 
the fulfilment of those commitments. 

YOUR APPLICATION 

1 . Request application forms in Junior year or early 
in your Senior year from the Director of Admissions. 

2. Complete and return your application to the 
Director of Admissions, with an application fee of 
$15 (non-refundable) at least tw^o months prior to the 
desired entrance date. Students who are financially 
unable to pay the $15 application fee will have the 
fee waived upon request. 

3. Request the guidance department of the 
secondary school from which you will be graduated 
to send an academic transcript and personal recom- 
mendation to. Director of Admissions, Eckerd 
College, Box 12560, St. Petersburg, Florida 33733. 

4. Arrange to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test 
offered by the College Entrance Examination Board 
or the ACT Test Battery, offered by the American 
College Testing Program. 

EARLY ADMISSION 

Students may be admitted to Eckerd College before 
completion of the normal secondary school 
program. Applicants for early admission are required 
to have an interview and an outstanding academic 
record with commensurate SAT and/or ACT scores. 



Advanced Placement Program 

Courses are honored at Eckerd College on the basis 
of scores on the Advanced Placement Examination 
administered by the College Entrance Examination 
Board. Scores of four and five automatically certify 
the student in the course covered by the examina- 
tion. Scores of three are recorded on the student's 
permanent transcript and are referred to the faculty 
of the appropriate discipline for recommendations 
concerning credit. 



SCALED 




SCORE FOR 


MAXIMUM 


AWARDING 


SEMESTER 


CREDIT 


CREDIT 


55 


3 hours 


55 


3 hours 


55 


6 hours 


55 


3 hours 


55 


6 hours 


55 


6 hours 


55 


3 hours 


55 


6 hours 


55 


3 hours 


55 


3 hours 


55 


6 hours 


55 


6 hours 


55 


3 hours 


55 


6 hours 



COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION 
PROGRAM (CLEP) 



EXAMINATION 
Algebra-Trigonometry 
American Government 
American History 
American Literature 
Biology 
Chemistry 

Educational Psychology 
English Composition 
General Psychology 
Introductory Accounting 
Introductory Calculus 
Introductory Economics 
Introductory Sociology 
Western Civilization 

Transfer Admission 

Applicants for transfer admission must submit an 
application for transfer admission, high school 
transcript, SAT or ACT scores, and a transcript of 
your college record with a catalog from all colleges 
attended. A personal statement explaining your 
reasons for wishing to transfer is also required. 

In order to graduate from Eckerd College, a student 
must ordinarily spend at least two years, including 
his Senior year, at the college or in an approved off- 
campus program. Request for exception, together 
with reasons, may be directed to the Provost. 

In order to be considered for transfer to Eckerd 
College, an applicant must be in good standing at 
the institution last attended and eligible to return to 
that institution. 

Applicants must ordinarily submit official results of 
the Scholastic Aptitude Test or the ACT Test Battery 
to the Director of Admissions at Eckerd College. 
Transfer applicants who have previously taken these 
tests may submit these scores or arrange to retake 
the examination. 

Veterans and other applicants who are older and 
wish to transfer old credits or whose earlier 
academic records are unavailable or unusual are 
requested to direct special inquiry to the Admissions 
Office. 

The transfer of credit from other colleges and uni- 
versities approved by their regional agency depends 
upon the comparability of the courses taken to those 
offered at Eckerd College and the approval of the 
academic division concerned. In general, courses in 
the liberal arts are transferable. Grades below "C" 
are not acceptable for transfer. Students wishing to 



(H 



transfer for spring term should initiate application 
before December 1 . 

All transfer students receiving the Associate in Arts 
degree from a regionally accredited two-year college 
will be admitted at the third year-level at Eckerd 
College. 



COSTS AND 
FINANCIAL AID 

Costs 

Annual Expenses (1975-76) 

Resident 
Students 
Tuition and fees $2,937 * 

Room and Board 1,255 

$ 4,192 



Non-resident 
Students 
$2,917 * 

$2,917 ■ 



* The tuition and fees are not identical with those 
shown on page 36 of the prospectus because of a $10 
increase subsequently voted by the Student 
Association. 

Aid to Students 

Financial aid based on demonstrated need is avail- 
able to students through the Financial Aid 
Committee. Academic performance, personal 
development, and potential contribution to the 
college community are important considerations in 
awards of aid. 

Financial need is determined by an evaluation of the 
Parents' Confidential Statement by the College 
Scholarship Service of Princeton, New Jersey. A 
student's total financial aid "package" will ordinarily 
include scholarship or grant, work aid, and loan. 
The college's financial aid program emphasizes self- 
help. Most students receiving financial aid are 
participants in the work-scholarship programs or one 
of the loan programs. Students are encouraged to 
seek outside sources of aid such as local and state 
scholarships; for example, Florida State Assistance 
Grants. All state residents demonstrating need are 
eligible. The college's f ianancial aid office assists 
students and parents to complete the application 
forms and obtain the grant. Within Florida, you may 
call collect for assistance at 1-813-867-1166 and ask 
for Mr. Bazemore. 
THOMAS PRESIDENTIAL SCHOLARSHIPS 

Each year ten Freshman applicants selected for out- 
standing achievement as indicated by academic 
accomplishments, creative talent, and character, 
may be awarded Thomas Presidential Scholarships. 
These merit scholarships provide $2,500 per year 
($10,000 total for four full years) and are not based 
on financial need. Scholarships are renewable 



provided the recipients' academic progress and 
personal development are satisfactory. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS 

Degree Requirements 

Eckerd College is chartered by the Florida legislature 
to confer the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bache- 
lor of Science. Its degree programs are approved by 
the Southern Association of Secondary Schools and 
Colleges. 

Basic requirements for a degree are: 
Satisfactory completion of a minimum of 32 courses, 
plus four autumn term or winter term projects, 
composing an integrated program which the student 
and Faculty-Mentor, subject to the stipulations of 
the collegium to which the student belongs, agree is 
consistent with the academic and career needs of 
the student. 

Unless special exemption is granted, as in the case of 
highly qualified transfer students, the final sixteen 
courses leading to a degree must be completed 
under the auspices of Eckerd College. 
A program for a student entering as a Freshman must 
include two Foundations Seminars and two 
Modes-of-Learning courses. 

A program for a student entering at either the Fresh- 
man or Sophomore level must include two Area 
Studies courses or other courses which are approved 
as alternate ways of achieving a world view. 
Participation in four upper-division colloquia, at 
least one of them outside the collegium of which he 
or she is a member, is expected of each student 
during the Junior and Senior years. 

Academic Credit 

Credit toward a degree is awarded for satisfactory 
course completion, independent study programs, 
directed study programs, academic work certified by 
another degree-granting institution, and proficiency 
demonstrated by examination. 

Credit by course completion is based upon the 
assumption that the college's academic program is 
the full-time activity of a student. A normal aca- 
demic load is eight courses plus an autumn term or 
winter term project in each year. 

Credit for Independent Study is based upon the same 
level of academic expectation which applies to 
courses offered in the curriculum. An Independent 
Study course is designed by a student in consultation 
with the professor who is to supervise and evaluate 
the work. An academic contract, drawn in advance, 
specifies the subject and method of inquiry, the 
materials to be used, the purpose of the project, and 
the basis of evaluation and credit. 



rD 



Provision is also made for credit by Directed Study. 
Both Independent Study and Directed Study require 
advance planning by the instructor and student. 
While initiative rests with the student for course 
design of independent Study, in Directed Study the 
instructor is responsible for supplying a syllabus 
which defines the program. 

Credit is granted by transfer from degree-granting 
institutions. A student entering Eckerd College 
should request that a transcript of work done in 
other institutions be sent to the Registrar. When the 
transcript has been evaluated, the applicant is 
notified of the credit accepted by transfer. An 
Eckerd College student who wishes to pursue some 
part of his program at another institution should 
have the approval in advance of his Faculty-Mentor. 

Credit for demonstrated proficiency is accorded 
when a student applies for it and successfully 
completes appropriate examinations. College Level 
Examination Programs are recognized for both 
advanced placement and academic credit. 

The college recognizes that many experiences 
outside the class room may contribute to a student's 
program. Internships, participation in community 
projects, and field experience may be accorded 
credit if closely coordinated with the student's 
academic program. Ordinarily such experience 
constitutes a part of a regular course. Only in special 
circumstances are off-campus projects and 
internships acceptable as equivalents to a course. 

Program Options 
MAJORS 

Rather than depending primarily on a range of 
"majors" in specific areas of study, Eckerd College 
assists students to plan an academic program around 
concentrations of study of their own selection. 
Students desiring information about major programs 
should consult the catalogue, collegial chairmen, 
Mentors, and discipline coordinators. All majors and 
concentrations are deliberately flexible, may be 
interdisciplimary, and can be structured to provide 
necessary preparation for graduate work or for im- 
mediate job entry. Because each student's academic 
program is individually designed with a Mentor, 
each student's particular needs and interests are the 
primary concern. 
INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Effective independent study presupposes both self- 
discipline and mastery of the methodologies 
demanded by the subject matter selected by the 
student. It therefore represents an advanced form of 
higher education. All independent studies are 
planned in collaboration with one or more 
sponsoring professors, approved by the Independent 



Study Committee, and evaluated by the sponsoring 
professor. In addition to providing an experience of 
academic self-management, independent study 
enables students to do research of personal concern 
but not of sufficiently general interest to justify 
inclusion in the course offerings. Students who are 
absent from the campus in Cooperative Education, 
on leave of absence, on internships or overseas may 
do independent studies and thus accumulate credit 
toward the B.A. degree. Students may study subjects 
related to locations remote from the campus when 
access to particular resources requires. Successful 
independent study prepares students for graduate 
school. 

The Independent Study Blue Book is the form of 
contract that governs this academic option and it 
states the applicable criteria. Students interested in 
self-initiated programs should expect to devote 
considerable time to development of the project. 

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 

A wide range of options, different lengths of time 
abroad, and many choices of location make it 
possible for each student to be involved in a foreign 
culture in ways that fulfill academic and career 
expectations. 

Semester Abroad in Britain is available each fall and 
spring at the college's own London Study Center. 
Each spring semester, Eckerd students have the 
opportunity to study graphic arts and art history in 
Florence, Italy. Opportunities for study in Africa, 
Hong Kong, and Latin America are anticipated. 

For Module or Semester Abroad, the college's 
comprehensive annual charges cover transportation 
(from departure point in the United States to the 
Study Center and back), room and board, and all 
program costs. Each student's financial aid package 
is retained in both options. 

Winter Term Abroad, during the January interim, 
provides students with choices among a variety of 
courses in several countries. Up to one-fifth of the 
Eckerd student body participates each year, and 
others take advantage of winter term for study at 
other schools within the United States (see section 
entitled Off-Campus Programs). 

OFF-CAMPUS PROGRAMS 

The modular schedule permits off-campus study for 
periods of one month (January), one module (7 
weeks), one semester (14 weeks), and up to a full 
academic year. Students are encouraged to take 
advantage of programs and facilities not available at 
Eckerd through the off-campus program, it is 
possible to participate in group projects with a 
faculty leader or to contract independent studies of 
the student's own design. Croup projects such as an 
archaeological dig in the southwest, study of 



(h 



Voodoo in New Orleans, government operations in 
Washington, DC, or urban problems in Chicago are 
possible. Independent projects for individual 
students have been undertaken in industry, the 
Argonne Laboratories, marine research, and at an 
Indian reservation. 

The winter term, through cooperation with other 
schools having similar calendars, provides for 
specialized, intensive projects on other campuses 
throughout the United States. As many as 100 
students participate in such exchanges each year, 
undertaking studies at more than fifty cooperating 
colleges. 

The office of International Education and Off- 
Campus Programs assists students in making 
arrangements, preparing contracts, and providing 
information and ideas related to various choices. 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 

Through a new Cooperative Education program, 
Eckerd College makes available to interested 
students an opportunity to alternate academic 
learning with off-campus employment. Although the 
college does not guarantee employment, it provides 
a listing of jobs which have been analyzed by the 
college for their pertinence to a variety of academic, 
personal, and vocational objectives, and is prepared 
to counsel students as they select among options 
known to the Cooperative Education Office. In 
certain programs the responsibility of locating a 
suitable position is shared with the student. 
Eckerd College encourages students to combine 
work experience with structured learning oppor- 
tunities through Independent Study and other 
means. Jobs selected should be related to studies at 
the college in order to achieve maximum benefit 
from the union of employment with the execution of 
an overall academic plan. 
PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 
Eckerd College regards liberal arts education as 
essential to thorough professional training and 
unites a broad freedom of student choice with 
course offerings designed to qualify students for 
graduate education in a number of fields, for law 
and medical school, medical technology, the 
ministry, engineering, elementary and secondary 
education, management, and selected community 
professions. 

The Eckerd principle is that pre-professional training 
shall be obtained through intensively supervised 
internship rather than by professional and pre- 
professional courses that tend to limit the scope and 
quality of liberal arts education. Discussion of the 
teacher education program, immediately following, 
exemplifies the application of this principle. 
Students in management take certain specialized 



courses, such as accounting, and prepare themselves 
through internships carefully planned with the 
Mentor of the management program. Similarly, 
community professions such as human relations 
occupations involve a thorough liberal arts base, to 
which are added supervised field and employment 
experiences designed to the particular interest and 
need of the student. Students apply for admission to 
their programs after demonstrating competence in 
the first and/or second years of the college. 
CAREER DEVELOPMENT 
The coordinated services of the Office of 
International Education, Human Development 
Center, Foundations Collegium, Cooperative 
Education Program provide opportunities for career 
exploration consistent with the emphases of liberal 
arts education. Personal counselling, testing, and 
internships provide a range of experience designed 
to lead into responsible vocational choices and 
career competence. 

INFORMATION FOR FRESHMEN 
AND TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Students entering Eckerd College for the first time in 
the fall of 1975 will arrive on campus August 22. 
Most freshman students and transfer students will al- 
ready have selected their Autumn Term project. 
Registration atthe close of Autumn Term on Septem- 
ber 12 will call for student and Mentor to plan a 
program of eight courses for the full freshman year: 
two class-wide Foundation Seminars, two modes-of- 
learning courses selected from the 31 offered, and 
four electives from the rest of the course roster for 
which a freshman student is eligible. 
Regular courses begin September 15 in the first of 
four seven-week modules. Courses may use either 
seven or fourteen weeks, but freshmen usually take 
two seven-week courses in each module. 
Foundations seminars involve a Mentor and his or 
her freshmen in two courses, "Inquiry and Human 
Nature" in fall term and "Search for Spirit" in 
Module IV. 

Modes-of-learning courses present skills of learning 
and creative expression necessary for successful 
study in college and throughout life. The courses are 
available to all students, but freshmen must select 
two, one from each of two different collegia. Some 
of the modes courses are introductory prerequisites 
for continued study in upper division courses. 
After the Christmas holiday, freshmen may choose 
to pursue a winter term project on the campus or 
abroad, or may leave the campus during January and 
return February 3 for Modules III and IV. 

The Foundations Collegium program is summarized 
in the form of a curriculum calendar for freshman 



d) 



students. Notice that the Mentor-student relation- 
ship operates throughout the year to develop a 



strong academic program for successful entry into a 
career of learning. 



Freshman Modular Calendar — 1975-76 



' Autumn ^ 


Module 1 


Module II 


3 weeks 

Aug. 22- 

(^ Sept. 12 J 

f \ 


7 weeks 
Sept. 15- 
Oct. 30 

V y 
f \ 


7 weeks 
Nov. 3- 
Dec. 19 

V 


f 




Foundations 


Modes of 


Academic 


Seminar* 


Learning 


Project and 

Orientation 

and 


^ K 


r \ 


r 


Exploration 


Elective 


Elective 


V J 


V ) 


V 



Winter 
Term 
4 weeks 
Ian. 5- 
Jan. 30 



Module III 
7 weeks 
Feb. 3- 
Mar. 19 



Module IV 
7 weeks 
Mar. 30- 
May20 



^r 



Optional 

for 
Freshmen 



^r 



Foundations 
Seminar* 



Modes of 
Learning 



J\^ 






JV 



" Ordinarily with same Menlor 



INFORMATION FOR ALL STUDENTS 

FALL TERM - Students may not enroll for credit 
MODULE I after the end of the drop/add 
period, Friday, September 19. 
MODULE II - Students may not enroll for credit 
after the end of the drop/add 
period, Friday, November?. 
WINTER TERM - ALL STUDENTS expecting credit 
for winter term must check in 
with the professor no later than 
Tuesday, January 6. 
SPRING TERM - Students may not enroll for credit 
MODULE 1 1 1 after the end of the drop/add 
period, Monday, February 9. 
MODULE IV - Students may not enroll for credit 
after the end of the drop/add 
period, Monday, April 5. 
Any pre-registered student who has not attended 
classes by the end of the drop/add period is not 
eligible for credit. 

CONTENTS 

Courses are listed here by subject matter. A list of 
collegial courses follows the subject matter 
listings. Modes-of-learning courses appear within 
subject matter listings and separately as 
modes-of-learning courses. 
On inside pages, courses are arranged by 
collegium; Foundations (pages 1-7), Creative Arts 
(pages 8-41), Letters (pages 42-66), Comparative 
Cultures (pages 67-90), Behavioral Science 
(pages 91-110), and Natural Sciences (pages 
111-138). Within each collegium section, courses 
are arranged by discipline or area of 
concentration. In addition, these pages contain 
descriptions of Physical Education Activities 
(pages 138-144) and Winter Term Projects (pages 
145-163). 



Course Designations 

Courses are designated by three letters, followed 
by three numerals. For many courses, two 
additional letters follow the number. 

1. Three letters indicate the collegium through 
which the course is offered: CRA-Creative 
Arts; LTR-Letters; CCU-Comparative 
Cultures; BES-Behavioral Science; NAS- 
Natural Sciences; FDN-Foundations. 

2. Three numbers 

a) First digit indicates the level of the 
course; 

-1 and 2 indicate a course at the 
freshman or sophomore level; 
-3 anU 4 indicate a course at the junior or 
senior level. 

b) Second digit 

-0-7 are used within the collegia for area 
and discipline designations; 
-8 indicates a course which meets an 
all-college requirement (Foundations 
seminars, values seminars, modes-of- 
learning courses, area-studies courses, 
and collegial colloquia); 
-9 indicates independent or directed 
study courses. 

3. Two letters following the number may be 
used at the discretion of the instructor or 
collegium to indicate specific disciplines or 
areas. The letters VS indicate that the course 
is part of the Values Sequence. 

Opportunities for independent study are available 
in all collegia. Independent study contracts are 
negotiated between the student and the faculty 
sponsor. Independent study contract forms are 
available in the Registrar's office. 
Directed studies are listed in this catalogue. 
Copies of directed studies are available in the 
Registrar's office. 



(^ 



COURSE LISTINGS 



Course 

Number Course Title Page 

AUTUMN TERM PROJECTS 

FDN 101 Photography: Science and Art (Block) 19 

FDN 102 Educational Recreation (Bredenberg) 19 

FDN 103 Uncle Sam's 200th Birthday: American Social 

Criticism of the 70's (N. Carter) 19 

FDN 104 Medieval English Drama: Pageants & Puppets (Empric) 19 

FDN 105 TheShadowof Time (Foster) 19 

FDN 106 Masks in Ritual, Drama, and Play (Johnston) 19 

FDN 107 Utopian Behaviorism (MacDougall) 19 

FDN 108 Theatre-Making for the 70's (Morrison) 20 

FDN 109 Opinion: Yours, Mine, Ours, Public (Murphy) 20 

FDN 110 The Scientific Work of Sir Isaac Newton (Pav) 20 

FDN 111 The Social Psychology of Romantic Love (Williams) 20 



MODES OF LEARNING COURSES 

CRA 181 AR Visual Problem Solving (Crane) 23 

CRA 183 AR Drawing Fundamentals (Hodgell, Rigg) 23 

CRA 180 LI Literary Studies (Meinke) 27 

CRA 185 MU Comprehensive Musicianship I (Waters) 28 

CRA 184 PS Humanistic Approach to Thinking and Feeling (West) 30 

CRA 180 SO The American Community (Staff) 31 

CRA 181 TH Movement as a Mode of Learning (Staff) 32 

LTR 181 HI Search for Meaning in History (Brundage, Wilbur) 35 

LTR 182 LI Literary Studies (Empric) 37 

LTR 186 LI Literary Studies: Comparative (H. Carter) 37 

LTR 183 PL Modes of Philosophizing (Irwin) 40 

LTR 185 PL Logic and Language (Pav) 40 

LTR 184 RE Understanding the Bible (Chesnut) 42 

LTR 185 RE Varieties of Religion (Chesnut) 42 

ecu 111 CR German Conversation Through Film I (Keeton) 46 

ecu 113 FR Elementary French (H. Genz) 46 

ecu 115 SP Elementary Spanish (Figueroa, Trakas) 50 

ecu 121 RU Elementary Russian (V. Parsons) 49 

ecu 181 RE Man's Search for Ultimate Reality (Carlsten) 48 

ecu 183 RE Religion in Non-Western Cultures (Johnston) 48 

BES 180 SO Introduction to Sociology (Martin) 58 

BES 182 PS Introduction to Psychology (Dembroski) 56 

BES 184 PO International Politics (Camelin) 55 

NAS 184 Computer Algorithms and Programming (Meacham) 59 

NAS 180 Bl Natural History (Jefferson) 61 

NAS 182 CH Introduction to Chemistry (P. Ferguson) 63 

NAS 187 MA Algebra (Meacham) 65 

NAS 188 MA Trigonometry (Lofquist) 65 

NAS 189 MA Finite Mathematics (Lofquist) 65 

Anthropology Courses 

ecu 201 AN Introduction to Field Archaeology (DeCroot) 43 

ecu 202 AN T+ie Anthropological Experience (DeCroot) 43 

ecu 208 AN Human Sexuality 43 

BES 230 AN The Nature of Human Adaptation (Barnett) 53 

ecu 291 AN The Endless Journey: An Introduction to Anthropology 

(Directed Study) (DeCroot) 44 

ecu 301 AN Anthropology of Religion (DeCroot) 44 

ecu 332 AN Making a Mirror of Man (DeCroot) 44 

BES 333 AN Contemporary Pacific Cultures (Barnett) 53 

BES 336 AN The New Archaeology (Barnett) 53 

BES 436 AN History of Anthropological Theory (Barnett) 53 



(ll 



Course 




Number 




Area Studies Courses 


ecu 


281 


AS 


ecu 


282 


AS 


ecu 


283 


AS 


ecu 


284 


AS 


ecu 


285 


AS 


ecu 


286 


AS 


Art Courses 


CRA 


114 


AR 


CRA 


181 


AR 


CRA 


183 


AR 


CRA 


201 


AR 


CRA 


210 


AR 


CRA 


211 


AR 


CRA 


214 


AR 


CRA 


215 


AR 


CRA 


216 


AR 


CRA 


219 


AR 


ecu 


260 


EA 


CRA 


318 


AR 


CRA 


340/341 AR 


CRA 


440/441 AR 


Biology Courses 


NAS 


112 


Bl 


NAS 


180 


Bl 


NAS 


211 


Bl 


NAS 


212 


Bl 


NAS 


213 


Bl 


NAS 


214 


Bl 


NAS 


311 


B! 


NAS 


312 


Bl 


NAS 


313 


Bl 


NAS 


314 


Bl 


NAS 


411 


Bl 


NAS 


412 


Bl 


NAS 


413 


Bl 


NAS 


419 


Bl 


NAS 


481 


VS 


Ctiemistry 


Courses 


NAS 


121 


CH 


NAS 


122 


CH 


NAS 


182 


CH 


NAS 


221 


CH 


NAS 


222 


CH 


NAS 


323 


CH 


NAS 


324 


CH 


NAS 


422 


CH 


NAS 


423 


CH 


NAS 


425 


CH 


NAS 


426 


CH 


NAS 


429 


CH 


NAS 


482 


VS 



Course Title 



Page 



Latin American Area Studies (Figueroa) 44 

Asian Area Studies (T. Chang, Joiinston) 44 

Soviet Area Studies (Parsons) 44 

French Area Studies (Cenz) 44 

German Area Studies (Keeton) 45 

African Area Studies (Barnett) 45 



Media Workshop: Intermediate Drawing (Rigg) 23 

Visual Problem Solving (Crane) 23 

Drawing Fundamentals (Hodgell, Rigg) 23 

Art Projects (Eckert, Hodgell) 23 

Media Workshop: Sculpture (Hodgell) 23 

Media Workshop: Clay (Eckert) 24 

Media Workshop: Wood (Eckert) 24 

Media Workshop: Painting (Hodgell) 24 

Media Workshop: Graphic Design (Rigg) 24 

Photography as Image Gathering (Eckert) 24 

Calligraphy as a Creative Art (T. Chang, Rigg) 43 

Media Workshop: Graphics (Hodgell) 24 

Intermediate Studio Critique (Art Staff) 25 

Advanced Studio Critique (Crane) 25 

Organismic Biology II: Vertebrates & Plants (Reid) 60 

Natural History (Jefferson) 61 

Ecology (Reid) 61 

Cell Biology (Roess) 61 

Botany (Jefferson) 61 

Microbiology (Jefferson) 61 

Comparative Physiology: Interpretive (Ferguson) 61 

Comparative Physiology: Investigative (Ferguson) 61 

Genetics & Development: Interpretive (Roess) 62 

Genetics & Development: Investigative (Roess) 62 

Advanced Topics in Ecology (Reid) 62 

Advanced Topics in Genetics (Roess) 62 

Advanced Topics in Botany (Jefferson) 62 

Independent Research: Thesis (Biology Staff) 62 

Biology Colloquium (2-year sequence) (Biology Staff) 62 

Concepts in Chemistry I (D'Agostino) 63 

Concepts in Chemistry II (D'Agostino) 63 

Introduction to Chemistry (P. Ferguson) 63 

Organic Chemistry I (P. Ferguson) 63 

Organic Chemistry II (P. Ferguson) 63 

Thermodynamics and Kinetics (Neithamer) 63 

Chemical Equilibrium (Neithamer) 63 

Advanced Organic Chemistry (P. Ferguson) 64 

Instrumental Methods of Analysis (Chemistry Staff) 64 

Biochemistry (Neithamer) 64 

Symmetry and Structure (D'Agostino) 64 

Independent Research: Thesis (Chemistry Staff) 64 

Chemistry Colloquium (2-year sequence) (Neithamer) 64 

Chinese and Japanese Courses 

CCU.217/218 CI Intermediate Chinese (P. Chang) 45 

ecu 391 CI Chinese Translation (Directed Study) (P. Chang) 45 

ecu 191 JA Beginning Japanese (Directed Study) (P. Chang) 45 

ecu 291/2 jA Intermediate Japanese I, II (Directed Study) (P. Chang) 45 



(jH 



Course 






Number 






ecu 


260 


1 EA 




ecu 


291 






ecu 


391 






Community Studies 


CRA 


106 


CS 




CRA 


306 


CS 




Economics Courses 


BES 


251 


EC 




BES 


252 


EC 




BES 


351 


EC 




BES 


352 


EC 




BES 


354 


EC 




BES 


356 


EC 




BES 


358 


EC 




BES 


456 


EC 




BES 


458 


EC 




Educ. 


ation 


Courses 


CRA 


201 


ED 




CRA 


203 


ED 




CRA 


220 


ED 




CRA 


291 


ED 




CRA 


312 


ED 




CRA 


325 


ED 




CRA 


391 


ED 




CRA 


401 


ED 




CRA 


421 


ED 




CRA 


422, 


,423, 


424 ED 


CRA 


431 


ED 




CRA 


435, 


436, 


437 ED 


French Courses 




ecu 


113/114 


FR 


ecu 


213/214 


FR 


LTR 


321/322 


FR 


LTR 


422 


PR 




LTR 


425 


FR 




ecu 


429 


FR 




German Courses 


ecu 


111/112 


GR 


ecu 


221/222 


GR 


ecu 


321 


CR 




ecu 


325/326 


GR 


ecu 


331 


GR 




ecu 


391 


GR 




History Courses 


ecu 152 


HI 




LTR 


156 


HI 




LTR 


157 


HI 




LTR 


181 


HI 




ecu 252 


HI 




LTR 


253 


(290) 


HI 


LTR 


254 


(290) 


HI 


LTR 


256 


HI 




LTR 


291 


HI 




LTR 


351 


HI 




LTR 


355 


HI 





Course Title Page 

Calligraphy as a Creative Art (T. Chang, Rigg) 43 

Chinese Calligraphy (Directed Study) (P. Chang) 46 

Chinese Drama (Directed Study) (P. Chang) 46 

Community Field Experience: Apprenticeship 25 

Community Field Experience: Internship 25 

Principles of Microeconomics (Oberhofer) 53 

Principles of Macroeconomics (Oberhofer) 53 

Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (Oberhofer) 54 

Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (Bentley) 54 

Managerial Economics (Bentley) 54 

Money and Banking (Bentley) 54 

Economic Development (Oberhofer) 54 

History of Economic Thought (Oberhofer) 54 

International Economics (Bentley) 55 

Early Childhood Education I (Staff) 25 

Early Childhood Education II (Ransbury) 25 

Community Education (Seniors) 25 

Alternative School (Directed Study) (Ransbury) 25 

Methods of Teaching Reading (Ransbury) ] 26 

Humanistic Education (Seniors) 26 

Prescriptive Teaching (Directed Study) (Ransbury) 26 

Elementary Education Methods I (Seniors) 26 

Psychology for Education (Seniors) 26 

Professional Elementary Education (Education Staff) 26 

Pre-lnternship (Bredenberg) 26 

Professional Education (Education Staff) 27 

Elementary French (H. Genz) 46 

Intermediate French (H. Genz) 46 

Introduction to French Literature (R. Genz) 34 

19th Century French Literature (R. Genz) 34 

20th Century French Literature (R. Genz) 35 

18th Century French Literature (H. Genz) 46 

German Conversation Through Film I, II (Keeton) 46 

German Conversation Through Film III, IV (Keeton) 46 

Advanced Composition and Conversation (Staff) 47 

Introduction to German Literature (Keeton) 47 

Novels of Herman Hesse (Keeton) 47 

German Phonetics (Directed Study) (Keeton) 47 

Europe in Transition: 1492, 1815, 1914 (Parsons) 47 

Art and History of Ancient Egypt (Brundage) 35 

Medieval & Renaissance History (Brundage) 35 

Search for Meaning in History (Brundage) 35 

Modern Russia & the Soviet Union (Parsons) 47 

History of England to 1714 (Wilbur) 35 

History of Modern Britain Since 1714 (Wilbur) 35 

American Civilization (McKee) 35 

History of London (Directed Study) (Wilbur) ' 36 

The New/ Deal (McKee) 36 

American Social & Intellectual History I (McKee) 36 



(^ 



Course 

Number Course Title Page 

LTR 356 HI American Social & Intellectual History II (McKee) 36 

LTR 358 HI History & Appreciation of Modern Painting (Brundage) 36 

LTR 359 HI The Annerican Revolution (McKee) 36 

LTR 391 HI The Progressive Movement (Directed Study) (McKee) 37 

LTR 392 HI The Industrial Revolution in America (Directed Study) (McKee) 37 

LTR 393 HI History of the British Empire Since 1783 (Directed Study) (Wilbur) 37 

LTR 451 HI Imperialism (Brundage) 37 

Leisure and Recreation Courses 

CRA 201 LR Leisure & Recreational Studies Exploration (Taylor) 27 

CRA 310 LR Programming & Leadership in Leisure and Recreation (Taylor) 27 

CRA 370 LR Leisure & Recreation Internship Projects 27 

Literature Courses 

ecu 136 LI Nineteenth Century Russian Novel in Translation (V. Parsons) 47 

CRA 180 LI Literary Studies (Meinke) 27 

LTR 182 LI Literary Studies (Empric) 37 

LTR 186 LI Literary Studies: Comparative (Carter) 37 

LTR 232 LI Linguistics (Carter) 37 

LTR 234 LI Shakespeare: Motley, Murder, and Myrrh (Empric) 38 

LTR 238 LI English Literature: Middle Ages to 18th Century (Matthews) 38 

LTR 239 LI English Literature: 1800 to Present (Matthews) 38 

CRA 291 LI Children's Literature (Directed Study) (Meinke) 27 

LTR 291 LI 20th Century European Fiction, Introduction 

(Directed Study) (H. Carter) 38 

LTR 292 LI American Fiction: 1950 to Present, Introduction 

(Directed Study) (H. Carter) 38 

LTR 293 LI Literature and the Process of Self-Discovery 

(Directed Study) (Matthews) 38 

LTR 308 LI The Dramatic Moment: Poetry of Donne & Jonson (Empric) 38 

LTR 309 LI 20th Century British & American Drama (Empric) 39 

ecu 329 LI Chinese Literature in English Translation (T. Chang) 48 

ecu 331 LI Life and Works of Herman Hesse (Keeton) 48 

CRA 391 LI Modern American Novel (Directed Study) (Meinke) 28 

LTR 391 LI 20th Century European Fiction, Further Readings 

(Directed Study) (H. Carter) 38 

LTR 392 LI American Fiction: 1950 to Present, Further Readings 

(Directed Study) (H. Carter) 38 

LTR 393 LI 20th Century American Women Artists & Writers 

(Directed Study) (N. Carter) 39 

LTR 394 LI James Joyce, Irish Writer (Directed Study) (Matthews) 39 

LTR 421 LI Chaucer (Matthews) 39 

LTR 422 LI Milton (Matthews) 39 

LTR 423 Li ' Romantic Poets (Matthews) 39 

LTR 424 LI Modern British Fiction (Matthews) 39 

CRA434 LI Senior Seminar: Poetry of Eliot and Pound (Meinke) 28 

ecu 491 LI Artistry of Federico Garcia Lorca (Directed Study) (Trakas) 48 

(Please see Writer's Workshop) 

Management Courses 

BES 201 MN The Managerial Enterprise (Wilson) 55 

BES 205 MN Principles of Accounting (Staff) 55 

BES 301 MN The Dynamics of Group Leadership (Wilson) 55 

BES 401 MN Group Leadership Practicum (Wilson) 55 

Mathematics Courses 

NAS 131 MA Calculus I (Staff) 64 

NAS 132 MA Calculus II (Staff) 65 

NAS 187 MA Algebra (Meacham) 65 

NAS 188 MA Trigonometry (Lofquist) 65 



O) 



Course 

Number Course Title page 

NAS 189 MA Finite Mathematics (Lofquist) 65 

NAS 191/2 MA Calculus I, II (Directed Study) (Staff) 65 

NAS 233 MA Calculus III (Meacham) 65 

NAS 234 MA Differential Equations (Meacham) 65 

NAS 235 MA Linear Algebra (Lofquist) 65 

NAS 332 MA Foundations in Geometry (Lofquist) 66 

NAS 431 MA Applied Mathematics (Meacham) 66 

NAS 433 MA Real Analysis I (Maddox) 66 

NAS 434 MA Real Analysis II (Maddox) 66 

NAS 439 MA Independent Research: Thesis (Staff) 66 

NAS 483 VS Mathematics Colloquium (Staff) 66 

Music Courses 

CRA 184 MU Comprehensive Musicianship I (Waters) 28 

CRA 242 MU Comprehensive Musicianship II: Medieval & 

Renaissance Periods (Smith) 28 

CRA 244 MU Seminar in Solo Vocal Literature (Waller) 28 

CRA 245 MU Choral Literature and Ensemble (Waters) 28 

CRA 266 MU Music Projects I (Waters) 29 

CRA 341 MU Comprehensive Musicianship III: Baroque Period (Waters) 29 

CRA 366 MU Music Projects II (Waters) 29 

CRA 391 MU 20thCentury Music (Directed Study) (Waters) 29 

CRA 442 MU Applied Music: Organ, Piano, Voice, Guitar, Strings, 

Brass, Woodwinds (Staff) 29 

CRA 444 MU Comprehensive Musicianship VI: Contemporary Music (Waters) 29 

Philosopliy Courses 

LTR 183/291 PL Modes of Philosophizing (Irwin) 40 

LTR 185 PL Logic and Language (Pav) 40 

LTR 191 PL Logic and Language (Directed Study) (Pav) 40 

ecu 191/2 PL Ethics I, II (Directed Study) (A. Johnson) 48 

CRA 251 PL Ethics (Gill) 29 

ecu 254 PL Political and Social Philosophy (A. Johnson) 48 

LTR 269 PL Basic Concepts of Measurement (Pav) 40 

CRA 352 PL Philosophy of Religion (Gill) 30 

LTR 365 PL History of Modern Philosophy: Hobbes to Kant (Irwin) 40 

LTR 366 PL History of Modern Philosophy: 19th Century (Irwin) 40 

LTR 369 PL Science in the Ancient World: Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece (Pav) 41 

CRA 450 PL Analytic Philosophy (Gill) 30 

Physical Education Courses 

CRA 171 PE Principles of Physical Education (Harley) 30 

(For Physical Education activities, please see page 68 .) 

Physics Courses 

NAS 141 PH Fundamental Physics I (Foster) 66 

NAS 142 PH Fundamental Physics II (Foster) 66 

NAS 243 PH Fundamental Physics III: Thermodynamics and Relativity (Block) 67 

NAS 345 PH Electronics for Scientists (Block) 67 

NAS 443 PH Quantum Physics I (Staff) 67 

NAS 444 PH Quantum Physics II (Staff) 67 

NAS 449 PH Independent Research: Thesis (Staff) 67 

NAS 484 VS Physics Colloquium (Staff) 67 

Political Science Courses 

LTR 171 PO National Government and Politics in the U.S. (Rackow) 41 

BES 184 PO International Politics (Gamelin) 55 

LTR 274 PO Civil Liberties (Rackow) 41 

BES 340 PO Political Development in Modernizing Nations (Gamelin) 55 

BES 347 PO Comparative Political Parties (Murphy) 56 

BES 349 PO The States in the Federal System (Murphy) 56 



(jD 



Course 




Number 




LTR 


371 1 


PO 


LTR 


372 1 


PO 


LTR 


377 1 


PO 


BES ■ 


440 1 


PO 


BES . 


444 1 


PO 


Hsyct 
CRA 


lolog 
105 


y Coursei 
PS 


NAS 


151 


PS 


BES 


182 


PS 


CRA 


184 


PS 


CRA 


208 


PS 


NAS 


251 


PS 


CRA 


302 


PS 


CRA 


308 


PS 


BES 


310 


PS 


BES 


312 


PS 


BES 


316 


PS 


BES 


317 


PS 


BES 


319 


PS 


NAS 


354 


PS 


NAS 


355 


PS 


BES 


391 


PS 


CRA 


401 


PS 


CRA 


407 


PS 


BES 


412 


PS 


BES 


416 


PS 


NAS 


451 


PS 


NAS 


459 


PS 


NAS 


485 


vs 


Religion Courses 


ecu 


181 


RE 


ecu 


183 


RE 


LTR 


184 


RE 


LTR 


185 


RE 


LTR 


253 


RE 


ecu 


262 


RE 


ecu 


263 


RE 


ecu 


264/291 RE 


LTR 


291 


RE 


LTR 


292 


RE 


LTR 


331 


RE 


LTR 


349 


RE 


Russian Courses 


ecu 


1 121/122 RU 


ecu 


221/222 RU 


ecu 


1 223 


RU 


ecu 


1 321 


RU 


Sociology 


■ Courses 


CRA 180 


SO 


BES 


180 


SO 


BES 


320 


SO 


BES 


322 


SO 


BES 


325 


SO 


BES 


328 


SO 


BES 


424 


SO 


BES 


426 


SO 



Course Title Page 

Constitutional Law I (Rackow) 41 

Constitutional Law II (Rackow) 41 

The American Presidency (Rackow) 41 

International Conflict and Crisis Behavior (Gamelin) 56 

The Politics of Poverty (Murphy) 56 

The Psychology of Personal Development (Wahking) 30 

The Biological Bases of Human Behavior (Capobianco) 67 

Introduction to Psychology (Dembroski) 56 

Humanistic Approach to Thinking and Feeling (West) 30 

Introduction to Clinical and Counseling Psychology (West, Staff) 30 

Fundamentals of Psychological Research (Capobianco) 67 

Gestalt Theory and Practice (West) 31 

Practicum in Peer Counseling (Wahking) 31 

Developmental Psychology (Dembroski) 56 

Social Psychology (Dembroski) 57 

Psychology of Personality (Harper) 57 

Psychometrics (Harper) 57 

Social Learning and Behavior Modification (Harper) 57 

Advance Topics in Biopsychology (MacDougali, Staff) 68 

Learning (MacDougali) 68 

Developmental Psychology (Dembroski) 57 

Theory & Practice of Child Therapy (Staff) 31 

Advanced Seminar in Croup Process (West) 31 

Research Seminar in Social Psychology (Dembroski) 57 

Research Seminar in Personality and Interpersonal Processes (Harper) 57 

History and Systems Psychology (MacDougali) 68 

Independent Research: Thesis (MacDougali) 68 

Biopsychology Colloquium (MacDougali) 68 

Man's Search for Ultimate Reality (Carlsten) 48 

Religion in Non-Western Cultures (Johnston) 48 

Understanding the Bible (Chesnut) 42 

Varieties of Religion (Chesnut) 42 

The New Testament (Chesnut) 42 

Asian Religions (East Asia) (Johnston) 49 

Christian Thought & Practice Through the Centuries (Carlsten) 49 

Religion in America (Carlsten) 49 

Introduction to the Old Testament (Directed Study) (Chesnut) 42 

Introduction to the New Testament (Directed Study) (Chesnut) 42 

Biblical Archaeology (Chesnut) 42 

Prophets and Mystics (Chesnut) 42 

Elementary Russian (V. Parsons) 49 

Intermediate Russian (V. Parsons) 49 

Readings in Russian (V. Parsons) 49 

Introduction to Russian Literature & Culture (W. Parsons) 49 

The American Community (Staff) 31 

Introduction to Sociology (Martin) 58 

Social Structure and Personality (Martin) 58 

Age and Generations (Martin) . 58 

To be announced (Staff) 58 

Complex Organizations and Bureaucracies (Williams) 58 

To be announced (Staff) 58 

History of Sociological Theory (Martin) 58 



r?) 



Course 

Number Course Title page 

Spanish Courses 

ecu 115/116 SP Elementary Spanish (Trakas) 50 

ecu 115/116 SP Elennentary Spanish (Figueroa) 50 

ecu 215 SP Intermediate Spanish I (Figueroa) 50 

ecu 216 SP Intermediate Spanish II (Figueroa) 50 

ecu 315/316 SP Advaned Spanish I, II (Figueroa) 50 

ecu 423 SP Golden Age Drama (Trakas) 50 

ecu 424 SP Modern Spanish Drama (Trakas) 50 

ecu 491 SP The Artistry of Federico Garcia Lorca (Directed Study) (Trakas) 48 

Swedish Courses 

ecu 191 SW Swedish I (Directed Study) (Carlsten) 51 

ecu 291 SW Swedish II (Directed Study) Carlsten) 51 

ecu 391 SW Swedish III (Directed Study) (Carlsten) 51 

Theatre Courses 

CRA 181 TH Movement as a Mode ofYearning (Staff) 32 

CRA 187 TH Theatre Arts: The Living Theatre (Carlson) 32 

CRA 201 TH Fundamentals of Film-Making (Morrison) 32 

CRA 266 TH Theatre Projects I (Staff) ^ 32 

CRA 276 TH Dance I (Staff) 32 

CRA 364 TH Design and Technique in the Theatre (Carlson) 32 

CRA 366 TH Theatre Projects II (Staff) 33 

CRA 376 TH Dance II (Staff) 33 

CRA 461 TH Seminar in Theatre History or Theory (Morrison) 33 

Writer's Worl<shop 

CRA 201 WW Criticism Workshop (Meinke) 33 

CRA 225 WW Poetry Workshop (Meinke) 33 

CRA 226 WW Fiction Workshop (Meinke) 33 

COLLEGIAL COURSES 

Foundations Collegium Courses 

FDN 121 Communications: Writing Skills (Staff) 20 

FDN 122 The Art of Oral Communication (Carlsten) 20 

FDN 123 Fitness and Skills (Harley) 20 

FDN 181 Inquiry and Human Nature (Matthews) 21 

FDN 182 Values and the Search for Spirit (Matthews) 21 

Creative Arts Collegium 

CRA 305 Resident Advisor Internship (Staff) 21 

CRA 380 VS Art and Society (Gill) 21 

CRA 381 VS Art and Language (Gill) 21 

CRA 382 VS Philosophy and Film: Ingmar Bergman (Gil!) 21 

CRA 383 VS Psychology of Consciousness (West) 22 

CRA 384 VS Poetry and Values in Contemporary America (Meinke) 22 

CRA 385 VS Development of Creative Community (Staff) 22 

CRA 388 VS The Art Experience (Hodgeil, Eckert) 22 

CRA 389 VS Creative Listening (Smith) 22 

CRA 484 VS Issues in Education (Ransbury, Bredenberg) 22 

CRA 487 VS Performance, Performing, Performer (Carlson) 22 

CRA 489 VS Visual Arts Senior Seminar (Rigg) 23 

Letters Collegium 

LTR 201 Western Civilization (Irwin, Wilbur) 33 

LTR 381 VS The Nature of Man (Brundage, R. Genz, Irwin) 34 

LTR 382 VS Science, Technology, and Human Values (Pav, Staff) 34 

LTR 383 VS Justice, Law, and Community (Rackow, Staff) 34 

LTR 384 VS Western Myths, Old and New (H. Carter, Chesnut, McKee) ,_ 34 



{£) 



Course 

Number Course Title page 

Comparative Cultures Collegium 

ecu 260 EA Beginning Calligraphy as a Creative Art (T. Chang, Rigg) 43 

ecu 261 Excerpts from Chinese Drama (P. Chang) 43 

ecu 383/483 VS Comparative Cultures (DeCroot) 43 

ecu 384/484 VS Professional Ethics & Personal Morals (A. Johnson) 43 

ecu 385/485 VS Ideology & Social Change: Japan, India, and the 

U.S. Compared (Johnston) 43 

Behavioral Science Collegium 

BES 260 Statistical Methods (Williams, Martin) 51 

BES 360 Research Design (Williams) 51 

BES 380 VS Public Policy (Bentley) 51 

BES 381 VS Social Psychology (Dembroski) 52 

BES 383 VS Political Ideology (Williams) 52 

BES 388 VS Utopias (Oberhofer) 52 

BES 480 VS ManagerialTheory and Practice (Wilson) 52 

BES 482 VS Models of Mental Disorder & Treatment (Harper) 52 

BES 483 VS Applied Sociology (Staff) 52 

BES 484 VS Deviance & Disorganization (Martin) 52 

BES 485 VS Physical Anthropology (Barnett) 52 

Natural Sciences Collegium 

NAS 184 Computer Algorithms and Programming (Meacham) 59 

NAS 191 The Universe (Directed Study )(Foster) . 59 

NAS 192 The World of Life (Foster) 59 

NAS 202 Chemistry, Man, and Society (D'Agostino) 59 

NAS 204 Electronics (Block) 59 

NAS 205 Astronomy 1976 (Block) 59 

NAS 206 The Paradox of Color (Foster) 59 

NAS 207 Introduction to Geology (Reid) 60 

NAS 291 A History of Scientific Ideas (Directed Study) (Foster) 60 

NAS 292 Readings in Science (Directed Study) (Foster) 60 

NAS 391 Cosmology (Directed Study) (Foster) 60 

NAS 401 The Oceans and Man (J. Ferguson) 60 

NAS 481 VS Biology Colloquium (J. Ferguson, Staff) 62 

NAS 482 VS Chemistry Colloquium (Neithamer, Staff) . 64 

NAS 483 VS Mathematics Colloquium (Staff) 66 

NAS 484 VS Physics Colloquium (Block, Foster) 67 

NAS 485 VS Biopsychology Colloquium (MacDougall) 68 

NAS 488 VS Natural Science Collegium Colloquium (Meacham, Staff) 60 

Physical Education Activities (No credit) 

Red Cross Basis Canoeing and Canoeing (Covert, Rhodes) 68 

Beginning Sailing (Covert) 69 

Advanced Sailing (Covert) 69 

Advanced Sailing II (Covert) 69 

Scuba (Covert) 69 

Beginning Water Skiing (Covert) 69 

Intermediate Water Skiing (Covert) 69 

Red Cross Advanced First Aid and Emergency Care (Rhodes) 69 

Red Cross Multimedia Standard First Aid (Rhodes) 69 

Red Cross Advanced Life Saving (Rhodes) 70 

Red Cross Water Safety Instructor (Rhodes) 70 

Red Cross Beginner Swimming (Rhodes) 70 

Red Cross Intermediate and Swimmer Course (Rhodes) 70 

Beginning Tennis (Harley, Livesey) 70 

Advanced Tennis (Harley, Livesey) 70 



(^ 



Course 

Number Course Title Page 

WINTER TERM PROJECTS 

On-Campus Projects 

Study Skills (Staff) 71 

Theatre Production (Carlson) 71 

Furniture Design and Construction (Eckert) 71 

The Academic Novel (Meinke) 71 

Project in Elementary Education Methods (Ransbury) 71 

Pre-Renaissance and Renaissance Drawing and 

Painting Techniques (Rigg) 71 

Workshop: Achievement Motivation (Seniors) 72 

Renaissance and Baroque Consort Music (Waters) 72 

Aztec Life and History (Brundage) 72 

The Dead Sea Scrolls and Non-Canonical Early 

Christian Writings (Chesnut) 72 

Contemporary Women Writers in France (R. Genz) 72 

The South in American History (McKee) 72 

Finding the Hidden Philosophy in Literary Criticism (Irwin) 73 

Research in American National Government and Politics (Rackow) 73 

The Three Great Pablos: Casals, Neruda, Picasso (Figueroa) 73 

Reading French: A Direct Approach (H. Genz) 73 

An Intensive Project in Reading German (Staff) 73 

The Anthropology of Conflict: The Cross-Cultural Study of 

Law and Warfare (DeGroot) 73 

Topics in Anthropological Linguistics (Barnett) 74 

Subcultures and Deviance (Dembroski) 74 

Interpersonal Processes (Harper) 74 

The Sociology of Popular Music (Martin) 74 

The Stock Market (Oberhofer) - 74 

Creative Problem-Solving in Management (Wilson) 74 

NAS 1 Natural Vegetation of Pinellas County: 

A Reconstruction (Jefferson) 74 

NAS 2 Biochemical and Genetic Characteristics of Amino Acid 

Transport Systems (Roess) 75 

NAS 3 Tolerance of Aquatic Organisms to Environmental Factors (Reid) 75 

NAS 4A Molecular Structure and Physiological Activity (P. Ferguson) 75 

NAS 5 Coordination Chemistry (Neithamer) 75 

NAS 6 Synthesis and Spectroscopy of Substituted Stilbenes (D'Agostino) 75 

NAS 7 Computer Project (Staff) 75 

NAS 8 The Practical Art of Problem Solving (Lofquist) 75 

NAS 9 Complex Variables (Meacham) 76 

Off-Campus Projects 

CRA 8 The Arts in Holland and Austria (Waters) 76 

LTR 2 A Sea-Going Seminar in the Bahamas (Chesnut) 76 

LTR 8 Reviewing the Lively Arts in London (H. Carter) 76 

ecu 1 Introduction to Colombian Culture (Figueroa) 76 

ecu 5 The Soviet Sense of the Past, the Present, and the Future (W. and V. Parsons) 76 

NAS 4 Science in America: 200 Years of Development (P. Ferguson) 77 

NAS 10 The Interaction of Science Technology and Socio-Economic 

Factors in England (Maddox) 77 

Winter Term in Ireland 

CRA 7 The Arts in Ireland, Past and Present (Crane) 77 

LTR 7 Pre-Historic and Celtic Ireland (Matthews) 77 

BBS 7 Commerce and Industry in Ireland (Bentley) 77 



FDN 


21 


CRA 


1 


CRA 


2 


CRA 


3 


CRA 


4 


CRA 


5 


CRA 


6 


CRA 


7A 


LTR 


1 


LTR 


2A 


LTR 


3 


LTR 


4 


LTR 


5 


LTR 


6 


ecu 


1A 


ecu 


2 


ecu 


3 


ecu 


4 


BES 


1 


BES 


2 


BES 


3 


BES 


4 


BES 


5 


BES 


6 



{jD 



FOUNDATIONS COLLEGIUM 

AUTUMN TERM PROJECTS 
FOR FRESHMEN 

FDN 101 

Photography: Science and Art 

Prof. Wilbur Block 

This course will emphasize both the technical and 
artistic aspects of photography. Text materials will 
be utilized as background for seminars on the 
chemistry of the formation and development of the 
latent image on film as well as composition and 
darkroom technology. The student should furnish his 
own camera and must provide his own film and 
paper. Darkroom facilities and chemicals for black 
and white processing will be supplied. Evaluation 
will be based on the student's participation in the 
seminars, his understanding of the subject matter, 
and the quality of prints representative of his original 
work. 

FDN 102 
Educational Recreation 

Prof. Richard Bredenberg 
The purpose of this autumn term is to assist 
individuals to become recreational leaders and 
teachers who can use "fun" activities as part of the 
teaching process. The curriculum will include the 
study of physical and mental capabilities of various 
age groupings and the acquisition of such skills a^ 
folk and square dancing, playing and making 
musical instruments, singing, active and quiet 
games, storytelling, and other skills which individual 
students may wish to develop. For a final project 
each student is expected to conduct a program of 
recreation at a school, youth center, or retirement 
center. 

FDN 103 

Uncle Sam's 200th Birthday: American Social 
Criticism of the 70's 

Prof. Nancy Carter 

Our group project will be to construct a birthday 
portrait - a composite image of Uncle Sam — from 
the study of works by contemporary social critics. 
We will articulate the major themes and ideas of 
concern to Americans in the 70's by asking what we 
have become as individual men and women and as a 
nation. We'll consider Jerzy Kosinski's Being There; 
essays from such commentators as Tom Wolfe, Paul 
Goodman, and Vivian Cornick; and visual arts and 
film. Each student will present a final project 
demonstrating his skills as a social critic by 
interpreting some '70's cultural document such as a 
film, a television program, or an essay. 



FDN 104 

Medieval English Drama: Pageants and Puppets 

Prof, julienne Empric 

This course is designed to enable the student to 
study and experience the miracle, mystery, and 
morality plays of 10th through 16th century England. 
Readings will include selections from each of the 
major cycles, as well as the acknowledged 
masterpieces. The Second Shepherd's Play 
(Wakefield Cycle) and Everyman. The study will 
culminate with a puppet show simulating the Corpus 
Christi procession, and the presentation of a 
conglomerate cycle of plays. Evaluation will be 
based upon participation in class discussion, ability 
to evaluate plays, and energy and creativity in 
project productions. 

FDN 105 

The Shadow of Time 

Prof. Irving Foster 

For three thousand years, man depended almost 
entirely on the sundial to mark the passage of the 
daylight hours. From the simple gnomon or obelisk, 
the sundial evolved into an instrument of surprising 
accuracy and great beauty. You are invited in this 
project to discover the time-keeping properties 
inherent in the gnomon, to learn the principle of 
operation of the common types of sundials, and to 
design and build a sundial in appropriate materials. 
Your work will be evaluated in terms of the sundial 
you build. Your reward will be to have created ^ 

something of value. 

FDN 106 

Masks In Ritual, Drama, and Play 

Prof. Gilbert Johnston 

It is said that the face reveals a person's true 
character and feelings to anyone who knows how to 
read its signs. By the same token, a mask conceals 
the true character, and thereby performs its unique 
magic. In this course we shall be exploring the 
various uses of masks, the forms they have taken in 
different cultures, and the meanings that their use 
implies. To this end, we may expect to make use of 
the insights of a variety of disciplines, including, 
anthropology, religion, drama, literature, and 
psychology. We will also make, and hopefully use, 
some mask of our own design. 

FDN 107 

Utopian Behaviorism 

Prof. James MacDougall 
This course will examine some of the Utopian 
schemes advanced by behavioristic psychologists, 
with particular emphasis placed upon B. F. Skinner's 



(^ 



classic work, Walden Two. Our study will begin with 
a reading of the novel and related works, coupled 
with group discussions designed to focus attention 
upon the key issues and assumptions of the works. 
This will be followed by an intensive study of the 
theoretical and empirical support for the 
behaviorists' assumptions concerning human 
behavior. Thus armed, we will return to the Utopian 
works in an effort to productively analyze, criticize, 
and, when possible, to suggest fundamental 
improvements in the ideas contained therein. 

FDN 108 

Theatre-Making For The '70's 

Prof. Charles Morrison 

Is theatre relevant to the 1970's? How is theatre 
different from film or television? What do you mean . 
when you say "Theatre"? These are some of the 
questions we will ask in this course. We will explore 
several modes of theatrical expression, from the 
conventional script to improvisation. We will 
experience the city of St. Petersburg as a theatrical 
event. The emphasis of the course is on theatre- 
making. We will meet daily in performance 
workshops for scene exploration, improvisation, and 
group exercises to help free the mind, body, and 
spirit for the theatre experience, if we are happy with 
our work and if it seems suitable for production, we 
can end the term with a performance for the entire 
campus. 

FDN 109 

Opinion: Yours, Mine, Ours, Public 

Prof. Ar^ne Murphy 

You will do a survey yourself, "taking the 
temperature" of the Eckerd College autumn term, 
and publishing a profile of your own freshman class. 
You will also cooperate in a survey of the 
surrounding community, learning the correct and 
incorrect ways of wording questions, of conducting 
face-to-face interviews, of compiling data, and of 
interpreting the information you collect. The 
Opinion Project will also illustrate the limitations of 
opinion sampling and associated fact-finding. 

FDN 110 

The Scientific Work of Sir Isaac Newton 

Prof. Peter Pav 

We will examine Newton's scientific achievements 
against the background of preceding and subsequent 
developments. We will compare Newton's role as 
synthesizer with his role as innovator. Was Newton 
carried along by ideas that were in the air, or was he 
a genius without whom science would not have gone 
forward? How did Newton change our world view? 
How did he relate science and religion? Our basic 



text will be E. N. da Costa Andrade's Sir Isaac 
Newton, and other sources by and about Newton. 
Students will be graded on class participation and 
their library research, culminating in a term paper. 

FDN 111 

The Social Psychology of Romantic Love 

Prof, lack Williams 

This course will examine a variety of social and 
psychological theories which purport to account for 
the phenomenon we call romantic love. The first 
week of the course will examine the importance of 
the "romantic love complex" to western industrial 
societies and contrast this pattern with the relative 
unimportance of romantic love in many other 
societies. The second week will be devoted to social 
psychological theories and research. The third week 
will be devoted to integrating social and 
psychological perspectives and to reviewing the 
professor's own research in the area. 

FOUNDATIONS COLLEGIUM COURSES 

FDN 121 

Communications: Writing Skills 

Staff 

This is a basic course in writing. Writing will be 
developed in relations to perception using the text. 
Here And Now: An Approach To Writing Through 
Perception. We will also explore writing in the 
context of related reading, study, and discussion 
skills. Other texts include The Practical Stylist, Seven 
Reading Strategies, and How To Study. 

FDN 122 

The Art of Oral Communication 

Prof. Alan Carlsten 

This course will provide an introduction to the 
techniques of oral communication. It will deal with 
three principal areas of oral communication: small 
group discussion and interaction; informal public 
address; and formal public address. Stress will be 
placed upon techniques of effective group 
discussion and participation as well as upon the 
preparation of both formal and informal public 
address. Laboratory work will entail performance in 
small groups and individual public speech recorded 
by video tape equipment. Critique and analysis by 
professor and class will follow each performance. 

FDN 123 
Fitness and Skills 

Prof, lames Harley 

This course is a study of the physical fitness problem 

in the United States. Special emphasis will be on 



ri) 



actual fitness training programs. The course will 
introduce as many skills to the students as time 
permits, in order to promote a lifetime of physical 
activity through at least one of the skills. Students 
will participate in a vigorous exercise program for 
the entire year, and must perform individual 
research in one specific area. Evaluation: a term 
paper of high quality is required. 
Prerequisite: a medical clearance. 

FDN 181 VS 

Inquiry and Human Nature 

Foundations Staff 

This course will focus on the problems of defining 
human nature and viewpoints taken by various 
disciplines such as anthropology, psychology, and 
the humanities. There will be three structural units: 

1) Inquiry and the Ascent of Humankind; 

2) Problem Solving Explorations; and 3) Inquiry and 
the Future of Humankind. The course will use a 
variety of approaches: lectures, films and 
demonstrations, discussions, projects, reports in the 
seminar groups, and individual work between 
student and Mentor. Evaluation will be based upon 
discussion, four or five papers or projects, and a final 
exam. 

FDN 182 VS 

Values and the Search for Spirit 

Foundations Staff 

An extension of the first seminar, the objectives of 
the course are: 1) to explore the spiritual 
dimensions of mankind; 2) to probe one's own 
identity; 3) to encourage respect for each other's 
beliefs; 4) to encounter the range of spiritual reality 
in art and act; 5) to consider the importance of faith 
for life on Spaceship Earth now and in the future. 
Five major issues (Meditation, Suffering, 
Redemption, Action, and Vision) serve as the core 
around which revolve readings, lectures, 
discussions, and workshops, at which students 
experience specific spiritual dimensions (Art, 
Altered States of Consciousness, Yoga, Tai Chi, 
Adventure, Selfless Service, etc.) 

COLLEGIUM OF CREATIVE ARTS 

COLLEGIUM COURSES 

CRA 305 

Resident Advisor Internship 

Sarahi Dean, Bill Savage, loan Minnis, Staff 
The primary purpose of the Internship is to increase 
the student's ability to observe, understand, 
evaluate, and act to facilitate community, social. 



and personal development of the people with whom 
the student is living and working. The following 
hours per week are expected of students: four of 
instruction, seven of preparation, and ten of 
laboratory. Evaluation will be on a substantial 
research project on an area related to the RA course, 
and on several shorter papers. 
Prerequisite: Selection as a Resident Advisor. 

CRA 380 VS 
Art and Society 

Prof, jerry Gill 

This is a colloquium course (VS) for juniors and 
seniors which investigates the relationship between 
the arts and contemporary culture, e.g., art and 
morality, art and politics, art and popular culture. 
Special attention is given to the Marxist analysis of 
these and similar questions. Students will participate 
in discussion groups on a rotating basis, write at least 
two one-page "thesis papers" and one five-page 
paper examining an important topic in some depth, 
and present (in a group) an exploratory 
project-report. 

CRA 381 VS 
Art and Language 

Prof, jerry Gill 

This is a colloquium course (VS) for juniors and 
seniors exploring the relation between artistic and 
linguistic expression. Focus is on the senses by which 
art can be understood as a means of communi- 
cation, with special attention given to the insights of 
Suzanne Langer and Ludwig Wittgenstein and their 
application to the "language of art." Students will 
participate in discussion groups on a rotating basis, 
write at least two one-page 'thesis papers" and one 
five-page paper which examines an important topic 
in some depth, and present an exploratory group 
project-report. 

CRA 382 VS 

Philosophy and Film: Ingmar Bergman 

Prof, jerry Gill 

This is a colloquium course for juniors and seniors 
dealing with the films of Bergman from a 
philosophical point of view. Attention will be 
equally divided between learning to view the films 
and analysing the philosophical dimensions of 
Bergman's work. Students will write two five-page 
papers. There will be a $10.00 materials fee which 
will go toward renting at least six of Bergman's films. 
Each film will be viewed at least twice and discussed 
in depth. The texts are: Elements of Film (Bobker) 
and Ingmar Bergman and The Search for Meaning 
(Gill). 



(^ 



CRA 383 VS 

The Psychology of Consciousness 

Prof. Thomas West 

This course is a junior and senior colloquium in the 
Human Development Cluster of the Creative Arts 
Collegium. With the development of humanistic 
psychology, attention has been directed to the 
phenomenon of consciousness. It may be that in our 
"normal" state we are aware of and are involved in 
only a small segment of our possible consciousness. 
Some studies indicate that the creative process is 
enhanced by the consciousness being in the alpha or 
theta states. This colloquium will explore the 
research, theories, and findings concerning altered 
states of consciousness. We will draw upon the 
creative venture in art, drama, music, and other 
fields where innovation occurs. 

CRA 384 VS 

Poetry and Values In Contemporary America 

Prof. Peter Meinke 

This course will concentrate on the content in the 
poems of Twentieth Century American poets. Man's 
relation to nature and society; to science and 
religion; to truth and beauty: these are the subjects 
of poets from Frost and Eliot to Ginsberg and James 
Dickey. The class will explore these relationships as 
evidenced in the poems, along with the role that 
poetry itself plays, or does not play, or can play in 
these relationships. 

CRA 385 VS 

Development of Creative Community 

Staff 

This course will examine in depth the understandings 
and the processes related to the social development 
of communities. Possible characteristics of "creative 
community" will be examined. Priority attention will 
be given to questions of group and human values, 
individual rights and freedoms, group options, 
planned long-range coordination, and sanctions. 
Concepts studied will include formal community 
organizations, professional charge agents, 
community problem-solving, and conflict 
management. Alternative strategies open to citizen 
development agents will be compared: social 
consensus, social action, social planning. 

CRA 388 VS 
The Art Experience 

Prof. Robert Hodgell and Prof, johin Eckert 
This course is open to any junior or senior (or 
sophomore with permission of instructors) who is 
working in any medium. It is designed to reveal what 



it means to be an artist today and to elicit from 
students various forms of response. Students will 
attempt to integrate the roles of artist, 
comprehender, symbol-maker, philosopher, human 
being, inquirer, reporter, writer, and critic. Each 
student is expected to continue working in the 
medium of his choice (theatre, dance, visual art, 
music, writing, etc.) This work will be brought to 
critiques and will be used as part of the total 
evaluation of each student's participation in the 
course. 

CRA 389 VS 
Creative Listening 

Prof. Shiirley Smitli 

We all listen to music according to our separate 
capacities, but in a certain sense we all listen on 
three separate planes. This course will help the 
student to improve the levels of listening on three 
planes: 1) the sensuous plane, 2) the expressive 
plane, and 3) the sheerly musical plane. While most 
music appreciation courses stress the historical- 
verbal approach to music, this course will stress the 
obvious fact that music is an aural art form . The 
student will listen to a great variety of music, and 
will learn to hear musical texture, tone color, 
rhythm, melodic form, etc. This course is a 14-week 
course, a collegium colloquium, and is therefore 
open only to juniors and seniors. 

CRA 484 VS 
Issues in Education 

Profs. Molly Ransbury and Richiard Bredenberg 
The sociological foundations of education are 
explored in this Creative Arts Collegium Colloquium. 
This seminar includes: reports and comments on 
internship observations and interactions; discussion 
of assigned reading from texts, periodicals, and the 
press; interviews with visiting experts, i.e., school 
board members, classroom teachers, parents and 
children; exploration of media as it relates to 
education; studies of the expectations of individuals 
and societies concerning education; development of 
a statement of personal-professional value 
demonstrating an integration of data from curricular 
experience. 

CRA 487 VS 

Performance, Performing, Performer 

Prof, lames Carlson 

This is a colloquium for those who seriously consider 
careers in the performing arts. They should be junior 
or senior students with performing arts concen- 
trations. Especially qualified and knowledgeable 
students who are not concentrating may be admitted 
with the recommendation from the music and 



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theatre faculty. Knowledge and experience will be 
assumed; this is not an introductory program. 
Evaluation will be made on the basis of a prepared 
portfolio and the audition or presentation associated 
with it, on the student's specific contribution to 
selected group presentations and on his general 
participation in discussions. 

CRA 489 VS 

Visual Arts Senior Seminar 

Prof. Margaret Rigg 

This course is designed to aid the student in 
transition from art student to post-graduate work in 
art. Areas of major focus will be: 1) the values 
implications of moving from art as a primarily 
personal expression to art as a public statement, 
2) exhibitions and exhibiting, 3) graduate study, 
4) vocational opportunities and preparation of a 
resume. Evaluation will be based on participation 
and involvement and on written assignments. 
Enrollment is restricted to senior art majors who 
have completed their thesis show. 

ART 

CRA 114 AR 

Media Workshop: Intermediate Drawing 

Prof. Margaret Rigg 

This course offers intermediate work in drawing skills 
using a rigorous approach to figure-ground spatial 
composition. Classroom drawing will concentrate on 
increasing individual development in drawing 
techniques and in the formal composition of two- 
dimensional space. Stress will be on technical 
mastery and the development of images including: 
graphite, pencil, pen and ink, water color, conte 
crayon, and advanced use of pastels and charcoals 
on fine papers. Tools and materials will cost from 
$30 to $50. 

Prerequisites: Drawing Fundamentals and 
permission of the instructor. 

CRA 181 AR [Modes of Learning] 
Visual Problem Solving 

Prof, lames Crane 

This course is designed to give the beginning art 
student a systematic approach to working in visual 
arts. Through a series of limiting problems, the 
student learns to develop his ideas, and as he learns, 
limits are decreased and freedom is increased. The 
primary aims of the course are to: 1) develop skills 
in spatial organization and in relating forms in 
sequence as an on-going process; 2) discover 
uniqueness and a personal approach to solutions, 
even within narrow and arbitrarily prescribed 



bounds; 3) develop an ability to make and 
articulate sensitive and astute judgment on the 
quality of solutions; 4) develop increased dexterity 
in the handling of visual media. 

CRA 183 AR [Modes of Learning] 
Drawing Fundamentals 

Prof. Margaret Rigg and Prof. Robert Hodgeil 
This course will follow a modes-of-learning 
approach, process-oriented, on learning to learn to 
draw. Basic drawing media and instruments will be 
used. The approach will be discovering new ways of 
seeing, feeling, recording, and expressing images 
and forms. Each student should expect the materials 
to cost from $30 to $50. This is a basic skill course 
and regular attendance is necessary and expected. 
Freshmen and sophomores are given top enrollment 
preference. The course may be repeated with a 
different instructor since the stress is on individual 
development rather than once-learned content. 



CRA 201 AR 
Art Projects 

Prof. John Eckert and Prof. Robert Hodgeil 
Art Projects provides an opportunity to work, under 
contract, in art media either independently or in 
media groups. Specific instruction, demonstrations, 
and workshops will be offered in painting, block 
print, ceramics, and wood. Work will be evaluated 
on the basis of quantity, craftsmanship, and 
evidence of involvement and personal aesthetic 
growth. Critiques will be scheduled regularly. Croup 
events will be scheduled, but extensive work will be 
expected outside scheduled time. Professors will be 
available at posted times for consultation. 
Prerequisites: Visual Problem Solving [CRA 181 AR] 
and Drawing Fundamentals [CRA 183 AR]. 

CRA 210 AR 

Media Workshop: Sculpture 

Prof. Robert Hodgeil 

Students are expected to become familiar with the 
problems and possibilities of three-dimensional work 
in various media through class discussions, slides, 
publications, and field trips. Each student will be 
expected to spend most of his course time working 
on his own sculpture projects with periodic class 
critiques. Evaluation will be based on the quality and 
quantity of the work produced. 
Prerequisites: Drawing Fundamentals [CRA 183 AR], 
Visual Problem Solving [CRA 181 AR], or permission 
of the instructor based on prior experience in related 
media. 



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CRA 211 AR 
Media Workshop: Clay 

Prof, lohn Eckert 

This course explores handbuilding -- material, form, 
and spirit. Students will experience clay mixing and 
recycling, various hand-forming methods, glazing 
and firing, pottery room organization and mainten- 
ance, and a thinking and feeling inquiry into the 
process in which they are engaged. Evaluation will 
be based on the quantity and quality of clay work 
produced, participation in group efforts in the 
pottery shop and critiques, and on two written 
statements. 

Permission required. Preference will be given to 
sophomore and junior art majors. 

CRA 214 AR 

Media Workshop: Wood 

Prof, lofin Eckert 

This workshop will explore various methods of 
working with wood, including carving, construction, 
lamination, wood-block printing, etc. Products of 
work can include sculpture, prints, or utilitarian 
items; the only limitation is the medium. A series of 
meetings will be held to critique work and discuss 
projects. Students will keep a comprehensive 
notebook of drawings, designs, and ideas during the 
course. Evaluation will be based on the notebook of 
drawings and ideas, and the quantity and quality of 
work produced. 

Prerequisite: Visual Problem Solving or wood- 
working skill. 

CRA 215 AR 

Media Workshop: Painting 

Prof. Robert Hodgell 

This workshop will introduce the fundamentals of 

painting. There will be a historical survey of 

materials and processes. Experimental work will be 

done in various materials as water color, tempera, 

oil, lacquer, acryllic, etc. Some materials will be 

provided but basic materials will cost the students 

from $30 to $100. 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor, on ttie 

basis of submitted portfolio. 

CRA 216 AR 

Media Workshop: Graphic Design 

Prof. Margaret Rigg 

This is a basic course in layout and preparation of 
work for reproduction in print. At least 7 works must 
be prepared and submitted to national, regional, or 
local magazines and newspapers for possible print- 
ing. It is not required that any works be accepted or 
printed or paid for to meet the requirement. 



Evaluation will be based on the quality and quantity 
of work produced and a written final examination. 
Prerequisites: Drawing, Visual Problem Solving. A 
degree of design sophistication will be necessary to 
do well in the course. 

CRA 219 AR 

Media Workshop: Photography As Image Gathering 

Prof, lohn Eckert 

This course is to help students to become more 
aware of visual images through the recording power 
of light-sensitive materials. The course will deal with 
gathering and presenting photographic images 
through the use of photographic processes and 
equipment. Work submitted will be appropriately 
mounted black and white photographs, two papers, 
and a notebook of data and comments kept by the 
student. Evaluation will be based on evidence of the 
student's progress as seen through the papers, the 
notebook, and the photographs. 
Permission of the instructor is required. Preference 
will be given to sophomore and junior art majors. 

ecu 260 EA 

Media Workshop: Principles and Practice of 

Calligraphy As A Creative Art 

Prof. Tennyson Chang and Prof. Margaret Rigg 
A study of the origin, development and theories of 
Oriental calligraphy and the adoption and 
application of its principles and technique in studio 
work. English calligraphy written with a brush will be 
included for those who wish it. (No paper, quiz, or 
final examination is required. Essays or projects may 
be presented to either instructor or to both for 
criticism and evaluation on honors basis. Passing 
grade given for acceptable class and studio 
performance.) 

The course is open to students with background in 
either Chinese studies or Drawing and Introduction 
to Visual Problem Solving. Due to working space and 
ink stones available, enrollment is limited to 30 
students. 

CRA 318 AR 

Media Workshop: Graphics 

Prof. Robert Hodgell 

This workshop will include instruction in various 

print media for beginners, but the workshop is 

primarily for those who wish to do serious work in 

printmaking. Stress will be on independent work 

with regular group critiques. 

The prerequisites are Visual Problem Solving, 

Drawing, or permission of the instructor based on 

sketch book or portfolio. 



^ 



CRA 340/341 AR 
Intermediate Studio Critique 

Prof, lames Crane and Prof. Margaret Rigg 

CRA 440/441 AR 
Advanced Studio Critique 

Prof, lames Crane 

These courses offer students a maximum of 
independence with regular critiques of their work. 
Each student is asked to prepare a contract for what 
he intends to do in the semester. Materials to be 
used are media at the choice of the student. Material 
expenses normally run from $50 to $100. Class time 
is used for review of the work, field trips, and 
discussion. All work done in the semester following 
the contract will be the basis for evaluation. 
Prerequisites are Visual Problem Solving, Drawing, 
and any media workshop. 

COMMUNITY STUDIES 

CRA 106 CS 

Community Field Experience: Apprenticeship 

CRA 306 CS 

Community Field Experience: Internship 

These courses provide apprenticeships and intern- 
ships in carefully selected community agency areas. 
Upon approval of the instructor and field supervisor, 
a mutually agreed upon contract is signed, identify- 
ing the particular job description, activities, and 
responsibilities of the student. Apprenticeships are 
defined as exploration into areas of personal student 
interest and of community need. Internships are 
defined as concentrated training in an area of 
student career or vocational interest. 
Prerequisites: Approval of instructor and field 
supervisor; second semester frestiman standing. 
Limited to twenty students per semester. 

EDUCATION 

CRA 201 ED 

Early Childhood Education I 

Prof. Alma Seniors and Prof. Rictiard Bredenberg 
The growth of the young child from infancy to age 
six will be examined in an attempt to establish links 
between biological, familial, and cultural influences 
on the child and the design of outstanding early 
educational practices. Students will observe one 
child with particular attention to individual differ- 
ences including birth order, sensory stimulation and 
deprivation, sex, race, and social class in relation to 
intellectual functioning, socialization patterns, and 
aptitudes. Evaluation will be based on an anecdotal 
record and exploration of issues such as design and 



implementation of early childhood curricula, 
alternate staffing, and the role of the family. 



CRA 203 ED 

Early Childhood Education II 

Prof. Molly Ransbury 

Emphasis is given to the development and imple- 
mentation of plans for an optimum learning environ- 
ment for three-, four-, and five-year-olds. A 
complete instructional unit is designed as part of a 
series of theory-oriented seminars and then opera- 
tionalized within a licensed early childhood 
program. Evaluation based on: 1) the effectiveness 
of the unit design as determined by child-learning 
outcomes; 2) the creativity of the design unit; 3) the 
extent to which the unit incorporates a sound 
theoretical base. 
Prerequisite: Early Childhiood Education I. 



CRA 220 ED 
Community Education 

Prof. Alma Seniors 

The focus of this course is on the community 
education concept and public education as the two 
merge to include the involvementof the total 
community toward individual and group self- 
sufficiency and cooperation. Students will be 
expected to explore the community education 
concept through visits to community schools, visits 
to centers for community education, discussions 
with visiting lecturers, required readings, and'class 
discussions. Student evaluation will be based on 
class participation and two final papers: Community 
Education Defined and A Community Education 
Model. 



CRA 291 ED [Directed Study] 
Education Experience: Alternative School 

Prof. Molly Ransbury 

The purpose of this directed study is to offer the 
student the opportunity for: 1) viewing approaches 
to the educational process; 2) assessing the concept 
of man as learner; 3) evaluating the learning process; 
4) refining attitudes toward schooling. Requirements 
include observing in several alternative schools, and 
conducting a teaching project in one school. Evalu- 
ation is based on a weekly conference with the 
school director, the professor, and the school staff. 
A video tape progress report is to be made and pre- 
sented to a group of students in education for 
evaluative feed-back. 



di 



CRA312ED 

Methods of Teaching Reading 

Prof. Molly Ransbury 

An investigation of the theory of reading is followed 
by practice in recognizing and diagnosing reading 
problems. Through a series of seminars and 
one-to-one experiences with children, the student 
develops competency in evaluating pre-reading 
skills; decoding, comprehension reference, and 
study skills. Evaluation is based on a diagnostic 
report for one child that employs both informal and 
formal diagnostic procedures. 

Prerequisite: Admission to the Elementary Education 
program, or approval of the instructor. First 
preference will be given to students in the 
Elementary Education program. 

CRA 325 ED 
Humanistic Education 

Prof. Alma Seniors 

This course will present an approach to education 
within the framework of confluent learning - the 
converging of affect and cognition in effective 
learning. During the course, students will be pre- 
sented with research studies, major theorists, and 
methodology in humanistic or confluent education. 
Such procedures as the magic circle, role playing, 
value clarification, simulation games, and small 
group interaction will be demonstrated and 
critiques. Evaluation will be based on: 1) class 
participation, 2) oral and written explanation of 
issues, 3) group and/or individual presentations, and 
4) a term paper. 

CRA 391 ED [Directed Study] 
Prescriptive Teaching 

Prof. Molly Ransbury 

An experience in prescriptive teaching techniques is 
an integral part of the structure of overall teaching 
competency. This directed study offers a mechanism 
through which the student may enhance skills. A 
child is selected based on teacher referrals, is 
observed in many different environments, and an 
assessment of problem areas and strengths is con- 
ducted. Learning sequences are then prescribed for 
the actual classroom setting. Evaluation is based on 
the successful implementation of prescriptive 
techniques, as demonstrated through video tape, 
teacher feed-back, and pupil growth. 

CRA 401 ED 

Elementary Education Methods I 

Prof. Alma Seniors 

This course includes an investigation of both the 

theory and practical application of methodologies of 



academic instruction. Through a series of seminars, 
individual conferences, observations, and 
one-to-one experiences with children, the student 
will explore, plan, and evaluate approaches to 
communication as a teacher. Evaluation will be 
based on the student's oral presentation of 
constructive suggestions for improving educational 
methodology, as well as on a tutoring journal. 

CRA 421 ED 

Psychology for Education 

Prof. Alma Seniors 

This is a study of the psychological foundations of 
education with emphasis upon those which have 
application for the classroom teacher. The course is 
interrelated with experiences of student teachers and 
is a requirement of candidates for elementary and 
secondary education certificates. The course is open 
to others by permission of the instructor. 

CRA 422, 423, 424 ED 
Professional Elementary Education 

Prof. Molly Ransbury, Prof. Alma Seniors and 
Prof. Richard Bredenberg 

The professional semester for Elementary Education 
interns includes participation in all phases of the 
operation of an elementary school. Interns practice 
their teaching skills at both the primary and 
intermediate grade levels within each of three 
methods of classroom organization; open space, 
self-contained, and team-teachmg. The intern also 
spends time in direct study with the school principal, 
social worker, guidance counselor, learning 
resources director, language arts specialist, and art, 
music, and physical education teachers. 
Prerequisites: admission to the Teacher Education 
program and the successful completion of all 
courses for Elementary Education certification 
except CRA 484 VS. 

CRA 431 ED 
Pre-lnternship 

Prof. Richard Bredenberg 

This is an experience-oriented course conducted 
primarily in the public secondary schools. Each 
student will be assigned to a public school teacher 
with whom he will work for 10 hours per week. 
Activities may include assisting in individualized 
instruction, tutoring small groups, teaching 
micro-lessons. Evaluation will be based on written 
self-appraisal as a candidate for the teaching 
profession, a written evaluation by the public school 
directing teacher, and an observation of the student 
performing his teaching function by the professor. 
Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Education 
program. 



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CRA 435, 436, 437 ED 
Professional Education 

Profs. Richard Bredenberg, Alma Seniors, and 
Molly Ransbury 

The first four-and-a-half weeks of the semester 
include a variety of experiences to equip students 
with skills for classroom teaching. The curriculum 
strives for student competency in the use of 
audio-visual materials, applications of learning 
theory to the classroom, special methods of 
teaching, knowledge of the operation of the public 
schools, and recent innovations in education , 
followed by nine weeks of student teaching during 
which the student teacher assumes full teaching 
responsibility. 

Prerequisites: Psychology for non-majors, Pre- 
professional Experiences 7 and 2 or Pre-lnternship, 
and formal admission to the Teacher Education 
program. 

LEISURE AND RECREATION 

CRA 201 LR 

A Leisure and Recreational Studies Exploration 

Prof. Henri Ann Taylor 

Designed as an exposure experience, this course 
introduces the student to several different fields of 
recreation and leisure. These include municipal 
recreation, recreation for the aging, recreation for 
the handicapped, college recreation, and hospital 
recreation. This introductory study will not only 
provide the students with an opportunity to observe 
these various programs, but will also enable them to 
assist professional staffs in various ways. It will 
introduce the student to the philosophy, purpose, 
and need for recreation as well as serve as an 
excellent screening device whereby students may 
determine if they wish to pursue the Leisure and 
Recreational Studies. 



CRA 310 LR 

Programming and Leadership In Leisure and 

Recreation 

Prof. Henri Ann Taylor 

This course will begin with an examination of the 
historical significance of leisure and recreation and 
their impact upon modern society. The class will 
explore program goals and leadership skills. In order 
that students acquire the necessary program and 
leadership competencies needed for effective leisure 
planning, the students will be involved in setting up 
model programs and directing selected recreational 
activities. Local programs and leaders will be 
evaluated and the course will end with a review of 



the challenge that future recreational programs and 
leaders face. 

Prerequisites: Leisure and Recreational Studies 
Exploration [CRA 201 LR]. 



CRA 370 LR 

Leisure and Recreation Internship Projects 

Prof. Henri Ann Taylor 

This course is designed for junior and senior Leisure 
& Recreation majors. It gives them the opportunity 
to work as interns in one of the many St. 
Petersburg agencies. The student chooses the 
project that most nearly suits his future career plans. 
Some of the Intern Projects are: 1) geriatric; 2) 
recreation for the handicapped; 3) municipal 
recreation; 4) hospital recreation. Evaluation is 
based upon supervisor's weekly reports, assigned 
readings including texts, daily journal including 
personal evaluation of the experience, and a paper 
on a project devised by the student including a 
report on procedures, results, and bibliography. 

LITERATURE 

CRA 180 LI [Modes of Learning] 
Literary Studies 

Prof. Peter Meinke 

This is an introduction to the various literary genres 
with concentrations on certain novels, e.g., Cide's 
The Counterfeiters, Kafka's The Castle, an anthology 
of poetry, and a book of short stories. The class will 
approach these works stylistically as well as themati- 
cally. Students will be evaluated on the basis of class 
participation and three analytical papers (each on a 
different genre). 



CRA 291 Li [Directed Study] 
Children's Literature 

Prof. Peter Meinke 

This course is designed to introduce students to the 
best of children's literature in the various genres; it is 
divided into seven sections: Nursery Rhymes, Fairy 
TaI.es, Folk Tales & Mythology, Picture Books, 
Fantasy, Poetry, and Fiction. Students may concen- 
trate in one or two areas, but must do some reading 
in all seven. The course will be evaluated on the 
quality of a journal kept by the student on his or her 
reading, plus a project which may be either creative 
(for example, writing a children's story) or scholarly 
(for example, an essay on the history of nursery 
rhymes). 



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CRA 391 LI [Directed Study] 
Modern American Novel 

Prof. Peter Meinke 

This course introduces the student to the major 
American novelists of the first half of the 20th 
century. Students are expected to read 10 to 12 
novels; they may substitute 3 or 4 books by the same 
authors for those suggested in the syllabus (e.g., The 
Great Gatsby for Tender Is The Night, etc.) Students 
will be evaluated on the basis of a journal kept on 
their reading. This journal should contain at least the 
following three elements: 1) a discussion of the 
novel's ideas and themes, 2) an analysis of the 
novelist's style, and 3) a subjective evaluation of 
both these aspects. 



CRA 242 MU 

Comprehensive Musicianship II: Music of Medieval 

& Renaissance Periods 

Prof. Shiirley Smitt) 

The sacred and secular music covered in this course 
will include the chant of the Middle Ages, the poly- 
phony of the 13th century, the carol of the 15th 
century, the music of Palestrina, and the Elizabethan 
dance and madrigals. In addition, students will study 
the institutions under whose patronage the music 
was composed and performed. Students will be 
encouraged to perform music from these periods. 
The lab will emphasize ear training and listening to 
the music. Evaluation will be based on participation 
in discussion, written exercises, quiz or listening, 
and either one research paper or a final exam. 



CRA 434 LI 

Senior Seminar: The Poetry of Eliot and Pound 

Prof. Peter Meinke 

This course will consist of a close reading of the 
major works of these two poets. The class will 
analyze the poems stylistically and thematically, 
and assess the roles of Pound and Eliot in the 
development of modern poetry. Required readings 
will include the collected poems of Eliot and Pound 
plus a considerable amount of critical material on 
them. Each student will be required to keep a 
journal, and to complete one formal paper on a 
particular poem, or poetic problem, for presentatiQn 
to the class. 

Prerequisite: Senior Literature or Creative Writing. 
For other Literature courses see Letters and 
Comparative Cultures Collegia. 



CRA 244 MU 

Seminar in Solo Vocal Literature 

Mr. Harry Waller 

This course involves a series of seminars and 
discussions of masterworks of vocal literature in all 
styles and periods. Students, faculty, and guests are 
invited to participate. Each student will give at least 
one formal presentation each semester. Critique 
sessions will enable the student to understand better 
the level on which he is able to communicate his 
musical ideas to his listeners. Credit for two courses 
will be given in the senior year for students who have 
satisfactorily participated in colloquia for each of 
four semesters. 



MUSIC 



CRA 245 MU 

Choral Literature & Ensemble 



CRA 185 MU [Modes of Learning] 
Comprehensive Musicianship I 

Prof. William Waters 

This course is designed to serve as an introduction to 
the fundamentals of music. The focus of the course 
is designed to increase the student's awareness of the 
process of becoming a musician, and of the role of 
the musician in today's society. Emphasis, too, will 
be placed on programmed, ear training and sight- 
singing both in the classroom and in independent lab 
sessions. Evaluation for the course will be based on 
written exercises, several short tests, participation in 
class activities, and a final examination. 



Prof. William Waters 

This is a survey of music for chorus from medieval to 
contemporary periods. Active membership in the 
Concert Choir is required concurrently with this 
course. Techniques of ensemble performance will be 
demonstrated and practiced. Proficiency in score- 
reading will be taught. The student is expected to 
gain knowledgeable insight into historical and 
stylistic considerations as well as performance 
practices appropriate to the periods studied. 
Evaluation will be based on quality of daily 
participation and on skills demonstrated in public 
performance. Students will be admitted on basis of 
audition. 



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CRA266MU 
Music Projects I 

Prof. William Waters 

Music Projects I will embrace a variety of perform- 
ance-centered musical experiences. Activities may 
be centered around solo or ensemble work and may 
comprise several short works or an extended work. 
Regular rehearsal is expected of each student, and 
weekly critique sessions will guide participants 
toward objectives set at the beginning of the work. 
Enrollment is open to all students, but each proposal 
must have the approval of the music faculty. Work 
may be distributed over more than one module for a 
single module's credit. It is possible to enroll more 
than once in Music Projects I, with a change of area 
of emphasis. 
Prerequisite is demonstrated musical skills. 

CRA 341 MU 

Comprehensive Musicianship III: Music of the 

Baroque Period 

Prof. William Waters 

The focus of this course will be the music of Bach 
and Handel, but study will by no means be limited to 
these two composers. Theoretical aspects of the 
course will include a study of contrapuntal practices 
of the period. Students will be encouraged to per- 
form music from this period, and the lab will 
emphasize ear training and listening to the music. 
Evaluation will be based on participation in 
discussion, written exercises, a quiz on listening, 
and either a research paper or a final exam. 
Prerequisite is Comprehensive Musicianship I or 
special permission of the instructor. 

CRA 366 MU 
Music Projects II 

Prof. William Waters 

Music Projects 1 1 is intended for those students who 
have demonstrated their abilities to handle musical 
tasks and are ready to move into larger areas of oper- 
ation, such as complete recitals. They will have 
demonstrated proficiency in theoretical and histori- 
cal background of the works with which they plan to 
deal, or they may be engaged in the production of an 
original work. Work may be done in more than one 
module for a single module's credit. By a change of 
emphasis, the course may be repeated for additional 
credit. 
Permission of the faculty is prerequisite. 

CRA 391 MU [Directed Study] 
Twentieth Century Music 

Prof. William Waters 

This course surveys important works of the major 

composers of this century. After completing the 



material of the syllabus, which will include readings 
from standard histories of this period, writings by the 
composers themselves, and listening to phonograph 
recordings of their works, students may choose for 
their final evaluation a written examination, an ex- 
tended paper on a topic approved by the instructor, 
or a project approved by the instructor. The course is 
open to all students. However, ability to read 
standard musical scoring at a minimal level is 
helpful. 

CRA 442 MU 

Applied Music, Organ, Piano, Voice, Guitar, String, 

Brass, Woodwinds 

Staff 

A student will learn to perform great music of all 
periods on any instrument offered as Applied Music 
through a program of disciplined practice and 
research into the music which is being performed 
One 1-hour lesson per week and at least six practice 
hours per week will earn one course credit for each 
year of study. Assigned library research will be made 
for compositions being studied. Evaluation will be 
based on student's performance level and his under- 
standing of compositions studied. 
Prerequisite: Permission of music faculty. 

CRA 444 MU 

Comprehensive Musicianship VI: Contemporary 

Music 

Prof. William Waters 

This course begins with the music of the French Im- 
pressionist School, and deals with the music of 
major composers such as Schonberg, Ives, Stravin- 
sky, Bartok, Webern, Varese, Orff, Messian, 
Hindemith, and Prokofiev. Theoretical consider- 
ations include post-tonal organization of sound, 
twelve-tone techniques, aleatory music, and other 
twentieth-century phenomena. Evaluation will be 
based on two oral reports, a major paper, and a final 
examination. 

Prerequisite: Comprehensive Musicianship I or 
special permission of the instructor. 

PHILOSOPHY 

CRA 251 PL 

Ethics 

Prof, jerry Gill 

This course traces the major moral philosophies in 
Western thought, from Plato through Nietzsche. 
Special attention is given to the foundations of 
moral reasoning and the definition of the good life. 
The texts will be Ethical Theories (Melden) and 
Ethics (Frankena). Students will be divided into 



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discussion groups and will rotate the major 
responsibility for class discussion. There will be at 
least two one-page thesis papers and one five-page 
paper applying the position of a major ethical 
thinker to a contemporary moral problem. There will 
also be a final integrative educational experience. 

CRA 352 PL 
Philosophy of Religion 

Prof, jerry Gill 

This course examines the major thinkers in the his- 
tory of Western philosophy of religion, and problems 
such as the existence of God, the problem of evil, 
the nature of religious experience and knowledge, 
the belief in an afterlife, and the meaning of 
religious language. The course will conclude with an 
attempt to construct a positive and contemporary 
approach. The texts will be: Philosophy of Religion 
(an excellent anthology) and The Possibility of 
Religious Knowledge (by Jerry Gill). The course will 
be run as a seminar, with students participating in 
regular discussions and writing three five-page 
papers on topics of their choice 
Some background in philosophy and/or religion is 
required. 

CRA 450 PL 
Analytic Philosophy 

Prof, jerry Gill 

This course considers the major thinkers comprising 

the analytic movement in Twentieth Century 

philosophy, including, Bertrand Russell, C. E. 

Mooer, Wittgenstein, P. F. Strawson, J. L. Austin, 

and John Wisdom. 

The texts will be: Classics of Analytic Thought 

(Amerman's anthology) and Wittgenstein's Traetatus 

Logical - Philosophicus. The course will be a seminar 

in which students carry the major responsibility for 

discussion. Each student will write three five-page 

papers. Attendance and close reading of the texts are 

required. 

At least two courses in philosophy are required. 

For other Philosophy courses see Letters and 

Comparative Cultures Collegia. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

CRA 171 PE 

Principles of Physical Education 

Prof. James Harley 

This course deals with historical, philosophical and 
scientific foundations of physical education; in- 
cludes the desired aims and objectives of physical 
education as a career; and introduces administration 
and curriculum. Students will spend a minimum of 



20 contact hours in one of the St. Petersburg schools 
in a pre-internshjp program. This will be a coopera- 
tive effort with public school teachers, to help deter- 
mine if the student is truly a prospective physical 
education teacher. Evaluation will be based upon a 
term paper and a final exam. 
A personal interview is the only prerequisite. 
For Physical Education activities see page 68. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

CRA 105 PS 

The Psychology of Personal Development 

Prof. Harold Wahking 

This study involves both theory and personal 
experience for the development of personality skills 
by which individuals can cope creatively with life. 
We seek to cultivate a wider and deeper range of 
emotional expressiveness and sensitivity. We will 
make a systematic study of the common crises of 
life, such as birth, leaving home, spiritual awaken- 
ing, marriage, parenthood, and death. In addition, 
we will explore our own personal responses to some 
of the current social problems which have impact on 
the personality development of individuals. These 
topics include the psychology of sexism, racism, 
sexual identity, suicide, and drug abuse. 

CRA 184 PS [Modes of Learning] 
Humanistic Approach To Thinking and Feeling 

Prof. Thomas West 

This experience will serve as a Modes of Learning 
course as well as for entry into the Humanistic 
Psychology concentration. Content will be drawn 
from the various forces in psychology (analytic, 
behavioristic, and humanistic). The focus will be on 
the interaction and blending from areas of theatre, 
religion, philosophy, music, and art, and the inte- 
gration of these in a person's exploration and devel- 
opment of communication, both interpersonal and 
within oneself Evaluation will be based on group 
participation, a mid-term oral examination, a final 
examination, a term project, and a class 
demonstration. There are no prerequisites, but 
preference will be given to those planning to enter 
the Creative Arts Collegium. 

CRA 208 PS 

Introduction to Clinical and Counseling 

Psychology 

Prof. Thomas West and Ms. Maria Santa-Maria 
This course will deal with personality theory, 
focusing particularly on the counseling process 



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itself. Topics to be examined are general perspec- 
tive, overview of theoretical foundations, the 
processes of counseling and therapy, and special 
areas of application. 

Evaluation will be based on participation in one 
panel presentation, role-playing in two counseling 
sessions, an annotated bibliography of the readings 
done during the course, a short paper on a specific 
topic of the student's choice directly related to 
counseling psychology, and a final examination. 
Prerequisite: one previous course in psychology. 

CRA 302 PS 

Gestalt Theory and Practice 

Prof. Thomas West 

Gestalt work is one of the foundation stones in the 
human potential movement lending itself well to 
therapy, personal growth, education, specialized 
counseling, and self-awareness. It developed from 
an integration of Gestalt psychology, existentialism, 
psychoanalysis, client-centered therapy, and body 
psychology. It deals with the individual as a whole, 
in a here-now, l-thou relationship. This experience 
will expose the student to the theoretical framework 
of Gestalt and how it is applied in education, 
therapy and personal growth. Evaluation will be 
based on a term project, a group demonstration, a 
midterm, and a final examination. 
Prerequisite: CRA 184 PS or BES 182, or permission 
of the instructor. 

CRA 308 PS 

Practicum in Peer Counseling 

Prof, i-larold Wahking 

This course of study will offer students who have 
successfully completed the course in Introduction to 
Clinical and Counseling Psychology the opportunity 
to gain increasingly detailed knowledge of three 
complementary approaches to counseling 
psychology and at the same time gain firsthand 
experience in paraprofessional peer counseling. 
Evaluation will be based on a paper synthesizing 
what the student has learned in theory and practice, 
written accounts of the student's paraprofessional 
care-giving sessions, and the contribution of the 
student to the paraprofessional seminar and to the 
case conference. 

CRA 401 PS 

Theory & Practice of Child Therapy 

Staff 

This course will allow a student to cover the theo- 
retical background of child development and 
therapy, to work as a therapist under supervision, 
and to participate in weekly seminars. Jhree hours 
weekly for the academic year are spent working with 



a child and in critiques with the supervisor. Required 
reading: White, Human Infants; Kagan, Personality 
Development; Bowlby, Attachment; Des Lauriers 
and Carlson, Your^hild is Asleep; Des Lauriers, The 
Experience of Reality of Childhood Schizophrenia. 
Evaluation will be based on a journal and a paper 
bringing experiences into the framework of theory. 
Prerequisites: CRA 184 PS or BES 182 with preference 
given to upperclassmen and to those majoring in 
psychology. Permission of instructor is required. 

CRA 407 PS 

Advanced Seminar in Group Process 

Prof. Thomas West 

Professionals and paraprofessionals are doing group 
work in many agencies. This seminar will study 
several models of group work such as organizational 
development, values clarification, encounter and 
reality therapy. Each student will be involved in a 
group and will have opportunity to lead groups 
under supervision. Required reading: Napier and 
Gershenfeld's Groups: Theory and Experience and 
Diedrich and Dye's Group Procedures: Purposes, 
Processes, and Outcomes and Mager, Goal Analysis. 
Oral and written examinations, demonstration of 
group leadership ability, and a journal will be used in 
evaluation. 

Prerequisites are a beginning course in group 
dynamics and introductory work in psychology or 
sociology. Enrollment will be limited to fourteen, 
and seniors will be given preference. 
For other Psychology courses see Behavioral Science 
and Natural Sciences Collegia. 



SOCIOLOGY 

CRA 180 SO [Modes of Learning] 
The American Community 

Staff 

This course is designed to provide a foundation for 
understanding the American community in its 
complexity, diversity, and patterned behaviors, 
using both theoretical and case study approaches. 
Students will develop skills in identifying and 
analyzing community structures and values; in 
receiving and responding to ideas and feelings about 
community; and in researching some aspects of 
community. The course is open to all students who 
wish to explore seriously their own feelings about 
community and will provide a solid foundation for 
those who may later choose to work in community 
studies. 

For other Sociology courses see Behavioral Science 
Collegia. 



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THEATRE 

CRA 181 TH [Modes of Learning] 
Movement as A Mode of Learning 

Staff 

Many movement systems exist -- yoga, ballet, and 
Tai Chi -- having such aims as spiritual change, 
performance, physical improvement, and self 
defense, in different proportions. The aim of this 
course is for each participant to evolve her or his 
own system of movement. In class we will experi- 
ment with principles upon which existing movement 
systems are based, as a foundation for construction 
of our own. Come prepared to move. Outside class 
you will be expected to spend at least one hour each 
day experimenting physically and evolving your own 
personal system. Evaluation will be based on your 
participation in class, your energy in experimenting 
outside class, and on the description of your system. 



CRA 186 TH [Modes of Learning] 
Theatre Arts: The Living Theatre 

Prof, lames Carlson 

This course is designed to develop in the student a 
sensitivity to theatre as a way of confronting life. 
The student will be introduced to the study and to 
the art of the theatre. Representative scripts will 
serve as the starting point for the discussion of the 
literature, the production, and the place of 
particular productions in their community and in 
history. Class discussions will alternate with 
laboratory and studio work for approximately six 
hours each week in addition to other group and 
individual work. Reports, critiques, and creative 
projects are required. 



CRA 266 TH 
Theatre Projects I 

Theatre Staff 

Work in Theatre Projects can involve participation in 
a wide variety of theatre enterprises. It represents 
the core of "theatre making" at Eckerd. Oppor- 
tunities to participate in production, in work-shops 
devoted to performance and to the crafts of the 
theatre, in critiques, and in other projects are 
provided. There are no regular class meetings except 
for organizational and critique sessions which meet 
almost every week. Participation and responsibilities 
will grow out of the disciplines of the selected 
projects. It is possible to distribute work over two or 
more modules for one module's credit. 



CRA 276 TH 
Dance I 

Staff 

Opportunity will be provided for training in dance 
and movement primarily in the modern dance 
tradition. Students interested in movement as 
personal expression and those interested in dance 
performance are invited to participate. As the year 
progresses, different projects will be established 
depending upon the level of preparation and the 
interests of the students. An optional period is 
offered each morning for special work in Dance 
Composition. The course may be repeated for credit. 
By permission, students may be accepted at the start 
of any module. 



CRA 201 TH 
Fundamentals of Film Making 

Prof. Charfes Morrison 

This course explores the basic technical and aes- 
thetic principles of film-making with emphasis on 
the elements of camera, lighting, and editing as the 
tools by which we create a cinematic image. During 
the first half of the course you will learn the vocab- 
ulary of film. In addition, we will attend assigned 
films on campus to study how a professional 
film-maker employs this vocabulary. The second 
half of the course will be devoted to the completion 
of a short (1-3 minute) film. You will be expected to 
develop the film from your original conception 
through the established process of film-making: 
script, storyboard, budget, shooting, editing. 



CRA 364 TH 

Design and Technique in the Theatre 

Prof, lames Carlson 

In this course, the visual aspects of the theatre will 
be studied. Students will consider architecture, 
costuming, lighting, scenery, and other crafts and 
techniques as they are used in constructing the 
theatrical image. Emphasis will be on the overall 
design of production; students will work in groups 
and individually on the designs for particular plays. 
Introductory opportunities for learning specific 
crafts will be provided. The course is open to 
students who have had some general experience in 
theatre production It is recommended that specific 
work leading to proficiency in theatre crafts be 
undertaken as an extension of this course. 



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CRA 366 TH 
Theatre Projects II 

Theatre Staff 

Theatre Projects II is primarily for work on individual 
projects in performance and production, and will 
ordinarily be built around a single undertaking such 
as a major production assignment. The course is for 
experienced students and enrollment requires prior 
arrangement with the faculty. Assignments to partic- 
ular projects may sometimes be made on the basis of 
tryouts. Students are expected to attend regularly 
scheduled Theatre Projects critique sessions. This 
course may be undertaken for one module or for 14 
weeks and for one or one-half credit unit. 

CRA 376 TH 
Dance II 

Staff 

Dance II is for students with some experience and for 
those who are interested in special projects in chore- 
ography and dance performance. Assignments to 
Dance II will be made by the instructor after confer- 
ences and tryouts. The course may be repeated for 
credit - one course credit for seven weeks or for 14 
weeks, depending upon the work undertaken. An 
optional period is offered each morning for special 
work in Dance Composition. 

CRA 461 TH 

Seminar In Theatre History or Theory: Third 

World Theatre In The U.S.A. 

Prof. Ctiarles Morrison 

A series of selected topics in the field of either 
theatre history or theory will be pursued against a 
background of general reading. Reports will be 
assigned and creative projects and special research 
will be encouraged. The topic for the seminar in 
Module IV, 1976, will be "Third World Theatre in the 
U.S.A." Selected developments of Black theatre, 
Cuban theatre, Chicano theatre, and the establish- 
ment of other ethnic and national groups will be 
considered. Enrollment is limited to students who 
have experience in theatre production or study in 
dramatic literature. 
Permission of the instructor is required. 

WRITER'S WORKSHOP 

CRA 225 WW 
Poetry Workshop 

Prof. Peter Meinke 

This course is open to all; preference is given to 

upperclassmen. The workshop will be limited to 1.5 



students and will concentrate on forms and tech- 
nique in poetry. Students will submit their poems for 
discussion and review. A familiarity with current 
poetry magazines will also be encouraged. 
Evaluation will be based on poetry written during the 
term. 
Permission of the instructor is prerequisite. 

CRA 226 WW 
Fiction Workshop 

Prof. Peter Meinke 

This course is open to all; preference is given to 
upperclassmen. The workshop will be limited to 15 
students and will concentrate on various fictional 
techniques. Students will bring in their stories and 
sketches for discussion and review. A familiarity 
with current fiction and books about current fiction 
will also be encouraged. Evaluation will be based on 
stories written during the term. 
Permission of the instructor is prerequisite. 

CRA 201 WW 

Writing Workshop: Criticism \ 

Prof. Peter Meinke 

This will be a practical workshop in writing reviews 
on new books in poetry and fiction. Students will be 
assigned reviews of set word length (500, 1,000, 1500) 
just as one normally gets them from newspapers and 
magazines. We will compare and analyse our 
reviews, along with reviews by professionals in The 
New Republic, Time, Harper's, etc. We will discuss 
and attempt writing for different audiences: mass 
newspapers, middlebrow magazines, scholarly 
journals. Evaluation will be on the quality of reviews 
and on technical competence (meeting deadlines, 
"clean" copies, covering specific information). 
No prerequisites. Limit: 15 students. 



COLLEGIUM OF LETTERS 
COLLEGIUM COURSES 

LTR 201 

Western Civilization 

Prof. Keith Irwin and William Wilbur 
Who are we? Where did we come from? Where might 
we be going? What is civilization? Are we currently 
civilized, or is Western civilization grinding to a 
well-deserved halt? We will attempt to answer such 
questions in this course, taking, as an example of a 
defmition of civilization, Kenneth Clark's film series 
"Civilisation." We will use the paperback of his 
sc ripts as a text, along with key cultural documents 
from the 11th to the 20th century. 



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LTR 381 VS 
The Nature of Man 

Profs. Burr C. Brundage, Rejane Genz, and 
Keith Irwin 

An understanding of his nature has been one of 
man's primary preoccupations. One view that has 
great influence on western culture defines man as 
sinner. Another view holds that man is distinguished 
from other animals by his capacity to use and under- 
stand symbols. These two views of man will be the 
primary areas of exploration for this colloquium, and 
the primary methods of analysis will be philo- 
sophical and theological. 

LTR 382 VS 

Science, Technology, and Human Values 

Prof. Peter Pav and Staff 

It is the purpose of this colloquium to examine 
historically and philosophically the nature of science 
and the ways science has influenced human value 
systems. Emphasis will be placed on readings and 
student-led discussions, with only occasional 
lectures or large group activities. Evaluation will be 
based on the quality of discussion participation, and 
one or more papers. There are no prerequisites. 
Students may have this colloquium credited either as 
Natural Science (NAS 387-487 VS) or Letters (LTR 
382-482 VS). 

LTR 383 VS 

Colloquium: Justice, Law, and Community 

Prof. Felix Rackow and Staff 

All persons living in social groups, whether the state, 
the city, or the family, are faced with the necessity 
of understanding "community" and the inter- 
relationships of "law" and "justice." The purpose of 
this colloquium is to explore the nature of law, its 
purposes, the means necessary to effectuate those 
purposes, the limits of the law's efficacy, the relation 
of law to justice and morality, and the modes by 
which law changes and grows historically in different 
communities. 

LTR 384 VS 

Colloquium: Western Myths, Old and New 

Profs. Howard Carter, /. Stanley Chesnuf and 
William McKee 

What are myths, and what can they tell us about 
ourselves? We will explore the nature of myth as a 
value-laden story that serves as a model for 
behavior We shall read a book about myths, such as 
Eliade's Myth and Reality for theory, then pass to a 



brief review of the chief myths in the Judeo-Christian 
heritage, in the Greek mythological tradition. The 
course will then focus on America from 1950 to the 
present, stressing the relation of personal and social 
values to our current myths. 



FRENCH 

LTR 321 FR 

Introduction to French Literature I 

Prof. Rejane Cenz 

The main purpose of this course is to further the 
students' knowledge of the language through liter- 
ature. Therefore, no attempt is made to offer a 
survey of literature, and most of the plays and novels 
are by contemporary writers: Gide, Mauriac, Camus, 
Saint-Exupery, lonesco, etc. Class meetings consist 
entirely of discussions, and participation is an 
important factor in evaluation. Evaluation will be 
based on a journal, class participation, short tests," 
and a final examination. 
Prerequisite: third year level of proficiency in 
French. 

LTR 322 FRZ 

Introduction to French Literature II 

Prof. Rejane Cenz 

The main purpose of this course is to further the 
students' knowledge of the language through litera- 
ture. Therefore, no attempt is made to offer a survey 
of literature, and most of the plays and novels are by 
contemporary writers; Gide, Mauriac, Camus, 
Saint-Exupery, lonesco, etc. Class meetings consist 
entirely of discussions, and participation is an 
important factor in evaluation. Materials to be used 
are plays, novels and poetry by the above authors. 
Evaluation will be based on a journal, class partici- 
pation, short tests, and a final examination. 
Prerequisite: third year level of proficiency in 
French. 

LTR 422 FR 

Nineteenth Century French Literature in French 

and in Translation 

Prof. Rejane Cenz 

As the title indicates, this course is open not only to 
students of French, but to all students interested in 
French literature. We will study Hugo, Balzac, 
Stendhal, Flaubert, Zola, Baudelaire, and Rimbaud. 
Approximately eight novels and Baudelaire's The 
Flowers of Evil will be required reading. Students 
can elect to keep a journal or to write several short 
positions papers on the books. Evaluation will be 
based upon class participation and one oral report. 



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LTR 425 FR 

Twentieth Century French Literature in French 

and in Translation 

Prof. Rejane Genz 

As the title indicates, this course is open not only to 
students of French, but to all students interested in 
French literature. We will study works from Proust, 
Cide, Mauriac, Sartre, Camus, Anouilh, lonesco, 
and Beckett; and we will learn about surrealism, 
existentialism, and the theatre of the absurd. About 
ten works will be read in the course. The students 
can elect to keep a journal or to write several short 
position papers on the books. Evaluation is based 
upon class participation and one oral report. 
For other French courses please see Comparative 
Cultures Collegium. 

HISTORY 

LTR 156 HI 

The Art and History of Ancient Egypt 

Prof. Burr Bruridage 

This is a course investigating ancient Egyptian arti- 
facts, art objects, architectural systems, materials, 
art skills, and canons - all set against the historical 
background. The purpose of the course is to present 
Egyptian civilization as an integrated whole, this 
being done best by investigating its achievements in 
art. There will be examinations, class discussions, 
and some opportunity for volunteered class reports. 
There are no prerequisites and freshmen are 
welcome in the course. 

LTR 157 HI 

Medieval and Renaissance History: 325 to 

middle 16th century 

Prof. Burr Brundage 

This course surveys European history from the break- 
up of the Roman Empire in the West to the middle of 
the 16th century. The text to be used is Norman 
Cantor's Medieval History which synthesizes the 
complicated history of the period and gives an 
overall view. However, so that a sense of the con- 
crete will be maintained by the student, one history 
of a specific country will also be used — Gabriel 
Jackson's The Making of Medieval Spain. Other 
paperbacks will also be assigned. There will be a 
term paper (approximately 25 pages) and two 
examinations. 

LTR 181 HI [Modes of Learning] 
The Search for Meaning in History 

Prof. Burr Brundage 

The course concentrates on a very limited time 

period and a limited subject — the age of Queen 



Elizabeth I and the confrontation, both military and 
diplomatic, between the great nations of Europe. 
The course has as its objective to display to the 
student the drama and the deviousness of history 
and the ways by which some historians attempt to 
stop it in its tracks and pin it down for its better 
understanding. 

LTR 253 Hi 

LTR 290 HI [Directed Study] 

History of England to 1714 

Prof. William Wilbur 

The history of England from the Roman occupation 
to the accession of George I is a rich and fascinating 
story and one which has unusual significance for 
Americans. This course opens with some consider- 
ation of the nature of the sources for English history 
and then deals with such main themes as the gradual 
unification of England after the collapse of Roman 
rule, the Norman Conquest and feudalism, the 
growth of the common law, the rise of Parliament, 
the Tudor revolution in government, the Anglican 
Reformation, the revolutions of the 17th century, 
and the triumph of parliamentary oligarchy. 

LTR 254 HI 

LTR 290 HI [Directed Study] 

History of Modern Britain, Since 1714 

Prof. William Wilbur 

This course traces the development of modern 
Britain from the accession of the first Hanoverian 
King, George I, to contemporary times. During this 
period Britain spawned the Industrial Revolution, 
became the world's largest empire, developed the 
cabinet system of government, transformed its own 
society from an agrarian oligarchy to an industrial 
democracy, became a welfare state, and finally lost 
its imperial power. 

Prerequisite: LTR' 253 HI or an equivalent course in 
the history of England. 

LTR 256 HI 
American Civilization 

Prof. William McKee 

In this study of the historical development of a 
democratic civilization in the United States, 
emphasis is placed upon three interpretations of 
American history — the traditional Progressive 
interpretation, the post-war Consensus school, and 
the recent New Left views. Three periods of social 
change will be studied in detail: the American 
Revolution, the Reconstruction of the South, and 
the New Deal. Criteria for evaluation will include 
participation in discussion, several short papers, a 
mid-term and a final examination. This course is 
open to any student with an interest in American 
history. 



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LTR 291 HI [Directed Study] 
History of London 

Prof. William Wilbur 

This is a course in urban history designed primarily 
for students in residence at the London Study 
Center. It focuses on London as the first truly 
modern city and offers the student insights into 
problems of urban history. Evaluation is based on: 
(1) the quality of a journal, annotating visits to 
historical sites and museums and observations of 
London life; (2) a documented research paper, 
focusing on some approved topic on London history 
and utilizing wherever possible maps, plans, 
architectural drawings, and primary sources 
available at the Guildhall Library. 



LTR 356 HI 

American Social and Intellectual History II 

Prof. William McKee 

This course will examine the history of American 
thought, culture, and social institutions from 1865 to 
the present. Emphasis will be placed upon the 
impact of Darwinism and industrialism on American 
thought, the Progressive Movement, and the crisis of 
liberal democracy in the twentieth century. Criteria 
for evaluation will include two hour tests, a term 
paper, and a final examination. 
This is an advanced level course in American history, 
and some previous college work in American history 
will be assumed. 



LTR 351 HI 
The New Deal 

Prof. William McKee 

This is a seminar course on the era of the New Deal. 
Taking a broad look at America during the decade of 
the 1930's, it will attempt to assess the impact of the 
depression on American life and the contributions of 
the New Deal. It will examine the thesis that the 
depression marked a major watershed in recent 
American history, and that the New Deal established 
the basis for the contemporary democratic consen- 
sus and the outlines of a liberal capitalist welfare 
state. Criteria for evaluation will include 
participation in discussion, brief papers based on the 
common reading, and a major research paper or 
project. 
Not open to freshmen. 



LTR 358 HI 

History and Appreciation of Modern Painting 

Prof. Burr Brundage 

This semester course covers the period in European 
painting from Manet through World War II. The 
purposes of the course are to provide the student 
with: a knowledge of the progress and fluctuations in 
the painting of the period and the relationships of 
this art with the larger events of the period; a 
knowledge of the various schools and institutional 
groupings of artists; an ability to analyze and 
appreciate a painting; familiarity with the lives and 
personalities of the painters; and finally, the 
opportunity to be enchanted. 

Freshmen and sophomores may be admitted with the 
consent of the instructor. 



LTR 355 HI 

American Social and Intellectual History I 

Prof. William McKee 

This course will examine the history of American 
thought, culture, and social institutions from the 
colonial period until 1865. The thought of 
Puritanism, the Enlightenment, and nineteenth 
century democracy will be studied in depth. Special 
attention will be paid to slavery and racism as 
contradictions to the prevailing democratic culture, 
and both pro-slavery and anti-slavery literature will 
be studied. 

This is an advanced level course in American history, 
and some previous college work in American history 
will be assumed. 



LTR 359 HI 

The American Revolution 

Prof. William McKee 

During the bicentennial year of American indepen- 
dence, this seminar course will study the era of the 
American Revolution. It will trace the development 
of the revolutionary movement, the trend toward 
independence, the formation of the new 
governments, and the creation of the federal 
constitution. Students will undertake a research 
project on some topic relating to the Revolution, 
utilizing the documentary collections available in 
the college library, and will present the results to the 
class in a seminar paper or other appropriate 
presentation. 
This course is not open to freshmen. 



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LTR 391 HI [Directed Study] 
The Progressive Movement 

Prof. William McKee 

This course deals with the Progressive Movement — 
one of the great movements for reform in American 
history. Required readings will examine the follow- 
ing: the nature of progressivism as a political 
movement, presidential leadership in the Progressive 
Era, progressivism and the reform of society, and 
intellectual developments in the Progressive Era. 
Approximately ten books will be required. 
This is an advanced history course and previous wor/c 
in American history or political science is required. 

LTR 392 HI [Directed Study] 
The Industrial Revolution in America 

Prof. William McKee 

The purpose of this course will be to examine the 
impact of the industrial revolution upon American 
life during the last three decades of the nineteenth 
century. It will examine the processes of industrial, 
economic, and social change which produced a 
transformation of American society during this 
period, and the reactions of Americans to these 
changes. Work to be submitted for evaluation will 
include at least four papers based upon readings. 
This is an advanced history course and some 
previous work in American history is a prerequisite. 

LTR 393 HI [Directed Study] 

History of the British Empire-Commonwealth 

Since 1783 

Prof. William WHbur 

This course focuses on the "second" British Empire — 
the period since the loss of the British North 
American colonies in 1783 -- and aims to give some 
understanding of the causes, nature, and conse- 
quences of British imperial expansion in the nine- 
teenth century and the reasons for the collapse of 
British power in the twentieth century. Evaluation 
will be based primarily upon four or five short 
written and oral research reports, plus a term paper 
on a problem selected by the student. 
A college course in modern European or British 
history is a prerequisite. 

LTR 451 HI 
Imperialism 

Prof. Burr Brundage 

The subject of this course is imperialism as it has 
appeared on earth from the beginning of history to 
the present. The class is limited to 12 students who 
must be either juniors or seniors, and who have 
successfully completed at least one history course. 
Each student is assigned an empire which he will be 



expected to research thoroughly - Spanish, 
Napoleonic, Incan, and others - and all students 
must demonstrate knowledge of the Roman and 
British empires. The student will be graded 
approximately 50% on his paperwork and 50% on 
his contribution to symposia. 
For other History courses please see Comparative 
Cultures Colleguim. 

LITERATURE 

LTR 182 LI [Modes of Learning] 
Literary Studies 

Prof, julienne Empric 

The course is an introduction to the critical study of 
literature. Attention will be divided between study- 
ing the literature itself in various generic forms 
(prose, poetry, drama), and studying the various 
critical approaches which have been refined for such 
study, e.g., new critical, psychological, biograph- 
ical. Evaluation will be based upon the student's 
progress toward understanding, selecting, and 
developing critical methods and techniques. There 
are no prerequisites. 

LTR 186 LI [Modes of Learning] 
Literary Studies: Comparative 

Prof. Howard Carter 

This section of Literary Studies will emphasize the 
comparative nature of studying literature. We will 
seek to develop skills of perception, analysis, and 
evaluation through reading, discussing, writing, and 
thinking. By taking a wide view of literature - 
chronologically, geographically, and interdisciplin- 
arily - we hope to understand why it is important to 
humans and how it relates to many aspects of life 
and thought. Students will be evaluated on class 
discussion and preparation, two short papers, one 
longer literary study, and a final exercise. 

LTR 232 LI 
Linguistics 

Prof. Howard Carter 

This course will offer an introduction to linguistics, 
taken in the widest sense. We will study descriptive 
linguistics, transformational grammar (stressing the 
teaching of language), etymology, language 
families, the history of the English language, and 
some topics from linguistic approaches to literature 
(stylistics) and communication theory. We will be 
interested in the uses and arts of words and the 
philosophical problems of knowledge and validity in 
word usage. The course should be useful to future 
teachers of language, whether English or foreign, 
students of literature, philosophy and 
communications. 



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LTR 234 LI 

Shakespeare: Motley, Murder, and Myrrh 

Prof. luHenne Empric 

This course will offer an introduction to Shakespeare 
through a sampling of each of his genres: poetry, 
comedy, tragedy, history, and romance. The focus 
will be dual: to develop a capacity to appreciate and 
evaluate Shakespeare's writings, and to enable the 
student to sense characteristic distinctions among 
the various genres in which Shakespeare worked. 
Each student will be responsible for participation in 
class discussion, a project-presentation of a portion 
of one of the plays, and three brief papers. There will 
be a final examination. 

LTR 238 LI 

English Literature: Middle Ages to Eighteenth 

Century 

Prof, lames Matt/iews 

This is a general survey of British literature from 
Beowulf to Blake, with emphasis both on historical 
traditions and outstanding individual artists. 
Readings from The Oxford Anthology of English 
Literature, Vol. I, will provide the material for class 
discussion and writing. A series of short papers (for 
class sharing), a mid-term and a final exam will 
constitute the basis of evaluation. 

LTR 239 LI 

English Literature: 1800 to Present 

Prof. James Matttiews 

This is a general survey of British literature from 
Blake to Beckett, with emphasis both on historical 
tradition and outstanding individual artists. 
Readings from The Oxford Anthology of English 
Literature, Vol. II, will provide the material for class 
discussion and writing. A series of short papers (for 
class sharing), a mid-term and a final exam will 
constitute the basis of evaluation. 

I. LTR 291 LI - Introduction 

II. LTR 391 LI - Further Readings 
Twentieth-Century European Fiction [Directed 
Study] 

Prof. A. Howard Carter 

The purpose of these courses is to allow students to 
read widely in the best of European fiction since the 
turn of the century. A student who has read little in 
this area should take the first course. Introduction to 
20th Century European Fiction, for which there is a 
specific reading list including the works of Proust, 
Gide, Sartre, Celine, Camus, Beckett, Mann, Kafka, 
Grass, Hess, Silone, Moravia, and Calvino. A student 



with some acquaintance with these authors should 
take the second course. Further Readings in 20th 
Century European Fiction, for which there is an 
extensive bibliography in the syllabus. 

I. LTR 292 LI - Introduction 

II. LTR 392 LI - Further Readings 
American Fiction: 1950 to the Present [Directed 
Study] 

Prof. A. Howard Carter 

The purpose of these courses is to allow students to 
read as widely as possible in recent and contempo- 
rary American fiction. A student who has done little 
reading in this area should take the first course. 
Introduction to American Fiction: 1950 to the 
Present, for which there is a specific reading list of 
such authors as Barth, Brautigan, Hawkes, Kerouac, 
Kosinski, McGuane, Nabokov, Oates, Updike, 
Didion, Plath, Parent, Baldwin, Ellison, Wright, and 
so on. A student with some acquaintance with most 
of these should take the second course. Further 
Readings in American Fiction: 1950 to the Present, 
for which there is an extensive bibliography in the 
syllabus. 

LTR 293 LI [Directed Study] 

Literature and the Process of Self-Discovery 

Prof, lames Mattt>ews 

This course of study is primarily a process of reading 
without teachers. It is designed to give you as much 
freedom as possible to develop potential paths of 
reading interest, while offering some initial sugges- 
tions and directions, some pertinent questions, and 
some usable critical tools. The syllabus for this 
directed course of study offers only guidelines and 
structures. The only required books are Peter Elbow, 
Writing Without Teachers and David Daiches, The 
Study of Literature, both of which are meant to be 
used as handbooks or reference points. 

LTR 308 LI 

The Dramatic Moment: The Poetry of John Donne 

and Ben Jonson 

Prof. luHer^ne Empric 

In this course we will study the poetry of Donne and 
Jonson, comparing their ideas and techniques, and 
focusing upon the relationship each poet reveals — 
to himself, to his beloved, and to the world beyond. 
We will attempt to distinguish for each poet his own 
form of "Rime, the rack of finest wits" (Jonson). We 
will examine perplexities held in common across 
centuries: "Seek true religion. O where?" (Donne), 
and evaluate the expression of timeless emotion: 
"Drink to me only with thine eyes, /And I will pledge 
with mine," (Jonson); "For godsake hold your 
tongue, and let me love!" (Donne). 



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LTR 309 LI 

Twentieth Century British and American Drama 

Prof, julienne Empric 

Various forms of 20th century English-speaking 
drama range from the well-made play to the 
episodic, the silent, and the poetic drama. The 
course will include representative 20th century 
dramatic forms - works by O'Neill, Williams, Miller, 
Eliot, Osborne, Pinter, Beckett, Arden and Stoppard. 
We will study the influences which helped to shape 
modern drama, and investigate solutions proffered 
by the different dramatists to the problem of lang- 
uage as communication in the twentieth century. 
Prerequisite: at least one course in theatre or drama. 

LTR 393 LI [Directed Study] 

20th Century American Women Artists and 

Writers Part I [c. 1900-1935] 

Dr. Nancy C. Carter 

This study begins by placing women artists and 
writers in the social and cultural context of their time 
with selected background readings. Primary empha- 
sis, however, will be upon their contributions in 
different media. Students will choose works to study 
from the following categories: photography, dance, 
poetry, and prose (including autobiography and 
biography, as well as fiction and other writings.) 
Some of the women represented in this study are 
Isadora Duncan, Georgia O'Keeffe, Edna St. Vincent 
Millay, Marianne Moore, Gertrude Stein, Anais Nin, 
Zelda Fitzgerald, and Djuna Barnes. 
Prerequisite: sophomore status. 

LTR 394 LI [Directed Study] 
James Joyce, Irish Writer 

Prof, lames Matthews 

This directed course of study is designed to read 
Joyce's work with an eye to the Irish culture — 
especially Dublin, Joyce's home city. The primary 
readings are The Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as 
a Young Man, Exiles, and Ulysses. Other required 
readings include Richard Kain, Dublin in the Time of 
Yeats and Joyce, and Hugh Kenner, Dublin's Joyce. 
Four papers will be required as basis of evaluation: 1) 
a critical reflection of Irish culture in the early 
works; 2) a research paper on some aspect of Irish 
culture; 3) a creative imitation of one section of 
Ulysses; and 4) a substantial paper on the Irish flavor 
of Ulysses. 

LTR 421 Li 
Chaucer 

Prof, lames Matthews 

This is an advanced seminar treating in considerable 

depth the work of England's major literary voice of 



the Middle Ages. Students in this seminar will par- 
ticipate in the first half of the general survey course 
in English literature as discussion leaders. During the 
separate seminar sessions, work-in-progress on 
selected topics from Chaucer's works will be 
presented and discussed. The primary text is The 
Works of Chaucer, ed. Robinson. A major paper and 
class participation will constitute the basis of 
evaluation. 
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 

LTR 422 LI 
Milton 

Prof, lames Matthews 

This is an advanced seminar on the works of John 

Milton. Students in this seminar will participate in 

the first half of the general survey course in English 

literature as discussion leaders. During the separate 

seminar session work-in-progress on selected topics 

from Milton's work will be presented and discussed. 

The primary text is John Milton, ed. Hughes. A major 

paper and class participation will constitute the basis 

of evaluation. 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 

LTR 423 LI 
Romantic Poets 

Prof, lames Matthews 

This is an advanced seminar on the works of the 
major Romantic Poets - Blake, Wordsworth, 
Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Students in 
this seminar will participate in the first half of the 
general survey course in English literature as dis- 
cussion leaders. During the separate seminar 
sessions, work-in-progress on selected topics will be 
presented and discussed. Standard editions of the 
works of each poet will be the primary texts. A major 
paper and class participation will constitute the basis 
of evaluation. 
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 

LTR 424 LI 
Modern British Fiction 

Prof, lames Matthews 

This is an advanced seminar on the novels of 
Conrad, Lawrence, Woolf, Forster, and Fowles. 
Students in this seminar will participate in the 
second half of the general survey of English literature 
as discussion leaders. During the separate seminar 
sessions work-in-progress on selected topics from 
modern British fiction will be presented and 
discussed. A major paper and class participation will 
constitute the basis of evaluation. 
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 
For other Literature courses see Creative Arts and 
Comparative Cultures Collegia. 



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PHILOSOPHY 



LTR 183 PL [Modes of Learning] 
LTR 291 PL [Directed Study] 
Modes of Philosophizing 

Prof. Keith Irwin 

By introducing the student to the thought of such 
philosophers as George Berkeley, William James, 
Plato, A. J. Ayer, and Jean-Paul Sartre, the intention 
of this course is to develop in his mind a sense of 
what arouses philosophical questions and of the 
possible modes or patterns for attempting to answer 
them. This assumes that philosophical questions 
differ from scientific, historical, technological, 
informational, common sensical, and many other 
kinds of questions we raise. The desired outcome of 
the course is that the student recognize and 
appreciate philosophical thinking. 



LTR 185 PL [Modes of Learning] 
Logic and Language ^ 

Prof. Peter Pav 

The main purpose of this course will be to study the 
method of critical, logical analysis of language and 
thoughts. We will initially look at normal, everyday 
language. How does it function? What roles does it 
play? What possible confusions does it involve? We 
will then turn to artificial logical language whose 
precision can help us understand and evaluate 
otherwise vague and difficult activities, principally 
argumentation. How is it that evidence and reasons 
support (or fail to support) conclusions? In studying 
the canons of valid inference, we will develop and 
analyze several techniques for evaluating 
arguments. 



LTR 269 PL 

Basic Concepts of Measurement 

Prof. Peter A. Pav 

Scientific measurement is the link between 
mathematics and the world. Scientists start by using 
measurement to obtain their initial data; and they 
finish by using measurement to test their conclu- 
sions. Much of the objectivity of science seems to 
come from its use of measurement, but not without 
raising many philosophical problems. How is 
measurement possible at all? To what are numbers 
assigned? We will study quantities, properties, 
scales, and types of measurement. Although most of 
our specific examples will come from the physical 
sciences, our study will be relevant to measurement 
in the social and behavioral sciences. 



LTR 365 PL 

History of Modern Philosophy: From Hobbes 

to Kant 

Prof. Keitti Irwin 

The generative problem over which philosophers 
struggled in the 16th through 18th centuries was the 
problem of knowledge. What can we claim to know? 
God, ourselves, the external world? Between the 
time of Descartes and that of Kant, the controversies 
raged. Working from W. T. Jones, History of Western 
Philosophy, Volume III, Hobbes to Hume, for his- 
torical continuity, we will give attention in primary 
sources to Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Hume, and 
Kant. Work in the course will be evaluated on the 
basis of short papers used for class discussion, a 
medium length research paper, and a final 
examination. 



LTR 191 PL [Directed Study] 
Language and Logic 

Prof. Peter A. Pav 

This course begins with the informal logic of 
ordinary language, and a consideration of different 
uses of language and how language relates to the 
world. Specific attention will be given to types of 
meaning and the communication difficulties posed 
by ambiguity and fallacy. The role of definition will 
also be studied. Then we turn to the classical logic of 
standard-form categorical propositions and 
syllogisms. Several methods for testing the validity 
of arguments will be presented. Assigned exercises 
will count 60% of the grade, and the open-book 
final examination will count 40%. 



LTR 366 PL 

History of Modern Philosophy: 19th Century 

Philosophical Movements 

Prof. Keith Irwin 

Three issues rising out of the tradition of Western 
philosophy and culture all came to a head in the 
nineteenth century: the competence of language; 
the possibility of bridging the gulf between the order 
of thought and the order of being; and the meaning 
and nature of history. These issues will be explored 
through primary source readings in the works of 
Fichte, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, 
Nietzsche, John Stuart Mill, Peirce, and Bradley. 
Evaluation will be based on papers, quality of 
discussion, a critical review of one work from the 
period, and a final examination. 



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LTR 369 PL 

Science in the Ancient World: Egypt, 

Mesopotamia, Greece 

Prof. Peter Pav 

In this course, we will develop an overview of 
science -- theoretical and applied - in these three 
lands during the period 3000 B.C. - A.D. 200. Tech- 
nology, physical science, biology, medicine, and 
mathematics will be included. Besides examining 
detailed scientific developments, we will consider 
the interrelations of science and philosophy. Our 
basic approach will be that of the intellectual 
historian. Students will be graded on class participa- 
tion, seminar presentations, a research paper, and 
two examinations. 

For other Philosophy courses see Creative Arts and 
Comparative Cultures Collegia. 



LTR 371 PO 
Constitutional Law I 

Prof. Felix Rackow 

This course examines those portions of the United 
States Constitution that deal with governmental 
structure, relationships, and power, including 
judicial review, separation of power, federalism, and 
selected powers of the national government. The 
approach utilized will be the study of cases. 
Students will read opinions of the Supreme Court; 
these will be discussed in class for analysis and 
trends. Midterm and final examinations are com- 
binations of closed-book tests done in class and 
open-book tests done outside of class. 



POLIirCAL SCIENCE 

LTR 171 PO 

National Government and Politics in the 

United States 

Prof. Felix Rackow 

This course deals with the principles and practices of 
our system of government at the national level. It 
will examine such areas as the principles and de- 
velopment of the Constitution; the essential 
features, consequences, and implications of federal- 
ism; the nature, methods, and functions of political 
parties and pressure groups; the national political 
conventions and primaries; electoral problems and 
reform; voting behavior; the establishment and 
growth, functions, and powers of the presidency; 
strong and weak presidents; the legislative process; 
the judicial process; and problems of civil liberty. 

LTR 274 PO 
Civil Liberties 

Prof. Felix Rackow 

The purpose of this course is to analyze and discuss 
recent problems in civil liberty. These problems 
usually boil down to an examination of the age-old 
problem of "liberty versus authority." In other words 
(1) how far can the liberty of an individual be limited 
in order to protect the liberty of other individuals, 
and (2) how far can the liberty of individuals be 
limited in order that the group will be protected? 
This course will examine the interplay of politics, 
social and economic conditions, and the law in such 
problems as free speech, religion, racial discrimi- 
nation, loyalty, immigration, and fair governmental 
procedure. 



LTR 372 PO 
Constitutional Law II 

Prof. Felix Rackow 

This course examines those portions of the United 
States Constitution that deal with relations between 
the individual and the government, primarily those 
relations cited specifically under the "Bill of Rights." 
The approach utilized will be the study of cases. 
Students will read opinions of the Supreme Court; 
these will be discussed in class for analysis and 
trends. Midterm and final examinations are combi- 
nations of closed-book tests done in class and open- 
book tests done outside of class. 



LTR 377 PO 

The American Presidency 

Prof. Felix Rackow 

This course considers the American presidency as a 
political and constitutional office - its growth and 
development from Washington to Ford. It will 
consider such topics as the president's role in 
formulating and conducting foreign policy; treaties 
and executive agreements; the president as 
Commander-in-Chief and as the protector of the 
peace. A midterm and a final will be required and 
students may choose to do a research paper. 
Ttiere are no prerequisites, but familiarity with ttie 
material covered ir\ National Government and 
Politics in tfie United States and/or U.S. History 
would be fielpful. 

For other Political Science courses see Behavioral 
Science Collegium. 



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RELIGION 

LTR 184 RE [Modes of Learning] 
Understanding the Bible 

Prof. Stanley Chesnut 

The principal aim of this course is to develop skills 
that will help students achieve an understanding of 
the Bible. In this effort we will employ the method- 
ologies of literary analysis, historical criticism, and 
theological exegesis. We will analyze and discuss 
such literary genres as poetry, drama, short story, 
parable, biography, and epistle. We will also 
consider the historical context of each literary work, 
as well as its oral and written traditions and history. 
Evaluation will be based upon total class participa- 
tion, reports, brief writing assignments, and frequent 
short tests. 

LTR 185 RE [Modes of Learning] 
Varieties of Religion 

Prof. Stanley Chesnut 

In this course we will develop and utilize the skills of 
analysis, description, and classification in our in- 
quiry into such religious phenomena as vision, 
ecstasy, conversion, revivalism, mysticism, 
sainthood, spiritualism, occultism, altered states of 
consciousness, and healing. The context of these 
studies will be Western religious experience as 
formed principally by the Jewish, Roman Catholic, 
and Protestant traditions, plus some of the "new 
religions" — Western Zen, Theosophy, Modern 
Gnosticism, the Jesus people, etc. 

LTR 253 RE 
The New Testament 

Prof. Stanley Chesnut 

This introductory study of the New Testament 
focuses upon its literature, its history, and its 
theology. We will read most of the documents in the 
New Testament canon, using the historical-critical 
approach, and we will look specifically for the 
religious meaning and significance of these sacred 
writings for the early Christian centuries as well as 
for our own time. Students will be evaluated on 
participation in all class meetings, oral reports, brief 
papers, frequent short tests, and a final examination. 

LTR 291 RE [Directed Study] 
introduction to the Old Testament 

Prof. Stanley Chesnut 

This course comprises a thorough study of the 
history, literature, and religion of the Old 
Testament, with emphasis on the major books of the 
Hebrew Bible (in English). With the guidance of a 
detailed syllabus, students will encounter the 



Pentateuch, the History, the Prophets, and the 
Writings of the Old Testament in their historical 
contexts. Israelite religion and its development is a 
central feature of this course of study. There are no 
prerequisites. This course is strongly recommended 
for students planning upper-level work in Bible at 
Eckerd College. 

LTR 292 RE [Directed Study] 
Introduction to the New Testament 

Prof. Stanley Chesnut 

Concentrating on the Gospels, this course includes a 
careful study of the life and teachings of Jesus, and 
readings from New Testament literature. A syllabus 
is provided, and students will work through a plan of 
study designed to introduce the most important 
ideas and events of the Gospels, Acts, the letters of 
Paul, other letters, and the Book of Revelation. 
There are no prerequisites. This course is strongly 
recommended for students planning upper-level 
work in Bible at Eckerd College. 

LTR 331 RE 
Biblical Archaeology 

Prof. Stanley Chesnut 

Historical research through archaeology continues 
to unearth exciting new information for the student 
of the Bible. We will consider archaeological 
methods, interpretation of data, the results of some 
of the more outstanding "digs," and the application 
of all this to understanding the Bible. This course is 
designed primarily for students of the Bible and 
religion, but it will be of interest also to students of 
history, anthropology, comparative cultures, 
humanities, and the Near East. 
Prerequisite: successful completion of a college- 
level course in Old Testament, New Testament, the 
Bible, or an equivalent course. 

LTR 349 RE 
Prophets and Mystics 

Prof. Stanley Chesnut 

Prophecy and mysticism are two of the most signifi- 
cant expressions of the human experience of tran- 
scendence. In this course we will study the lives and 
words of famous prophets and mystics, using such 
resources as biblical selections. Islamic writings, 
documents from history of the Christian Church, and 
contemporary works. 

Prerequisites: previous academic study of religion 
and upperclass standing, or permission of the 
instructor. 

For other Religion courses see Comparative Cultures 
Collegium. 



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COLLEGIUM OF 
COMPARATIVE CULTURES 

COLLEGIUM COURSES 

ecu 260 EA 

Beginning Chinese Calligraphy as a Creative 

Art 

Profs. Margaret Rigg, Tennysor) Chang 

For description please see Creative Arts Collegium. 

ecu 261 

Excerpts from Chinese Drama 

Prof. Peter Chang 

This is a literary and theatrically oriented course 
dealing with the study of Chinese drama. An intro- 
ductory study concerning conventions, costume, 
history, make-up, music, staging, andstyle of acting 
comprises the major part of the course. Some 
excerpts may be staged and presented pending class 
preference. Evaluation will be based on either a 
research paper of ten to fifteen pages or a play; there 
will also be a midterm and a final exam. 

ecu 483 VS 

Colloquium: Comparative Cultures 

Prof. Dudley DeCroot 

Description will be available in a supplement to be 

published in the fall. 

ecu 484 VS 

Colloquium: Professional Ethics and Personal 

Morals 

Prof. Ashby lohnson 

The purpose of the course is to provide critical and 
informed dialogue regarding the ethical standards 
associated with a range of vocations which require 
academic background. Topics considered are: the 
formation of value judgments, ethics of the market- 
place, professional ethics in research, morals in 
public life, ethics in communication and mass 
media, art and morals. Two papers are to be 
submitted during the course. These, together with an 
examination and seminar participation, furnish the 
basis for evaluation. 

ecu 485 VS 

Colloquium: ideology and Social Change: Japan, 

India, and the United States Compared 

Prof. Gilbert Johnston 

How do systems of ideas, secular or religious, 
become ideologies and how do such systems influ- 
ence social change? Or do they simply reflect 
changes that have already taken place in other areas 



of society? These will be among the principal guiding 
questions for the colloquium as it inquires into 
several distinctly different paths toward moderni- 
zation and post-modern development as represented 
by Japan, India, and the U.S. Evaluation will be 
based on participation in class discussion, three 
short papers, and one examination. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

ecu 201 AN 

Introduction to Field Archaeology 

Prof. Dudley DeCroot 

This is a basic introduction to the study of archae- 
ology. While reading of relevant materials will be 
required, the major portion of the course will involve 
participation in an archaeology field experience. 
Readings, field notebook, and dig equipment will be 
assigned. Evaluation will be based upon field 
notebook. 

Prerequisites: introduction to Anthropology or 
permission of instructor. 

ecu 202 AN 

The Anthropological Experience 

Prof. Dudley DeCroot 

This is a multi-media investigation of the world of 
the anthropologist Through slides, films, lectures, 
small group discussions, and elementary field 
experience, the student will come in contact with 
the concepts and viewpoints of contemporary 
anthropology and, hopefully, experience the world 
from an anthropological perspective. Slides, tapes, 
films, books, and artifacts will be assigned for con- 
sideration. Evaluation will be based upon an indi- 
vidualized contract basis. 

ecu 208 AN 
Human Sexuality 

Prof. Dudley DeCroot 

The bio-social nature of Human Sexuality will be 
studied, using an anthropological, cross-cultural 
perspective. While the biological aspects of human 
sexuality will be reviewed in depth, the major 
emphasis of the course will be an exploration of 
sexuajity as symbolically invested behavior. The 
consequences to man of his symbolic investment of 
sexuality will be studied in their cultural, social and 
personal dimensions. Selected readings, field project 
works, and small group interactions will be required 
in addition to participation in lecture/discussion 
sessions. Evaluation will be based upon one 
examination and a series of analytic projects. 
Prerequisite: none. 



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ecu 291 AN [Directed Study] 

The Endless {ourney: An Introduction to 

Anthropology 

Prof. Dudley DeCroot 

This course is designed to introduce the student to 
the basic concepts, theoretical viewpoints, and 
research techniques of contemporary anthropology. 
The required reading and writing assignments will 
enable the student to become familiar with the 
anthropological perspective, and provide an 
opportunity to apply that perspective through 
writing assignments. Evaluation will be based upon 
writing assignments submitted. Three textbooks are 
utilized in the course. 

ecu 301 AN 
Anthropology of Religion 

Prof. Dudley DeCroot 

Various theoretical frameworks commonly utilized 
by anthropologists (structural/functional, symbolic 
analysis, ecological) will be explored for their use- 
fulness in studying and understanding religion in 
culture. There will be a strong emphasis on field 
studies dealing with non-Western societies. Evalua- 
tion will be based upon a research paper and an 
ethnographic report. 

Prerequisites: Introductory Anthropology or 
permission of instructor. 

ecu 332 AN 

Making A Mirror For Man: An Introduction To 

Anthropological Research Methodology 

Prof. Dudley DeCroot 

All aspects of the anthropologists' way of knowing 
will be explored during this 14-week course. 
Lecture/discussions will be tied in with readings and 
field work experiences. Students will have an oppor- 
tunity to operate as anthropologists in the design 
and implementation of different types of research 
modes. Evaluation will be based upon class partici- 
pation and completion of field work projects. 
Prerequisites: Introductory Anthropology. 
For other Anthropology courses see Behavioral 
Science Collegium. 

AREA STUDIES 

ecu 281 AS 

Latin American Area Studies 

Profs. Frank Figueroa, Dudley DeCroot 
This course will study the people and cultures of 
Latin America. Using a cultural-anthropological 
approach, we will proceed in a structured manner to 



attain an understanding of who and what constitutes 
Latin America. Lectures, special presentations, 
movies, and classroom discussion will complement 
the readings. Evaluation will be based on a final 
examination and completion of a special project to 
be agreed upon between the instructor and the 
student. 
Prerequisite: sophomore year or higher. 

ecu 282 AS 
Asian Area Studies 

Profs. Cilbert Johnston and Tennyson Chang 
The cultures of India, China, and Japan are as 
different from each other as they are from 
present-day America. What is commonly called "The 
East" is neither single nor unified. This course 
attempts to provide an initial view of the diversity of 
social structures, religious values, and life styles that 
characterize the peoples of South and East Asia 
today. Some attention will be given to formative 
ideas and institutions from the past, but most of the 
emphasis will be on cultures as they exist in modern 
times. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. 

ecu 283 AS 
Soviet Area Studies 

Prof. William Parsons and Staff 

This area-studies course traces the historical 
background and evolution of contemporary Soviet 
institutions and introduces the students to the 
present realities of Soviet life. In addition to a 
general overview, students will have the opportunity 
to examine specific problems of Soviet Studies by 
selecting two workshops, such as the following: 1) 
Russian and Soviet music; 2) Revolutionary Russia; 

3) The Land and the People of the Soviet Union; and 

4) The Soviet Marxist tradition. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. 

ecu 284 AS 
French Area Studies 

Prof. Henry Cenz and Staff 

This course is designed to be an introductory study 

of modern France with an emphasis on the period 

following World War II. Both village and urban life 

will be examined from the point of view of the 

distinguishing characteristics of the French people, 

their institutions, traditions, customs, values, 

literature, art, and music. Evaluation will be based 

on class discussions, tests, paper or special project, 

and final examination. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. 



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ecu 285 AS 

THE GERMAN HERITAGE 

Prof. Kenneth Keeton and Staff 
This course in German area studies is designed to 
provide the student with some insight into the 
character of the German-speaking peoples of Europe 
through an introduction to their mythology and art, 
their political and social heritage, and a close look at 
present realities in the German countries today. A 
variety of formats will be employed. In addition to 
regular lecture and discussion classes, the course 
will feature a film series, guest speakers and special 
topic workshops on various aspects of German 
culture. A syllabus and specific texts will be made 
available in advance of this course. 



ecu 286 AS 
Cultures of Africa 

Prof, loan Barnett 

What did it mean to be an African in the past? What 
does it mean now? This course focuses on the 
traditional cultural heritage of African and the 
expression of that heritage in modern African life. 
Emphasis will be placed on comparisons of patterns 
of culture for selected societies. The following 
readings will be required: The Barabaig; East African 
Cattle Herders, Klima; The Kanuri of Bornu, Cohen; 
Peoples and Cultures of Africa, Skinner; and 
Continuity and Change in African Cultures, Bascom 
and Herskovits. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. 



CHINESE -JAPANESE 



ecu 218 CI 
Intermediate Chinese 

Prof. Peter Chang 

This is the second half of second year Chinese (see 
ecu 217 CI in Module I for course description). 
Required reading: Read Chinese Book I by Fangyu 
Wang; Read Chinese Book II by Richard Chang. 
Prerequisite: CCU 217 CI or equivalent. 



ecu 391 CI [Directed Study] 
Chinese Translation 

Prof. Peter Chang 

This is a course in practical translation training for 

student.': who have completed Advanced Chinese. 

The student will translate Chinese newspaper 

articles, poems, and short stories into English. The 

assignments will include ancient Chinese writings as 

well as modern communist writings. 

Prerequisite: Three years of Chinese language or its 

equivalent. 



CCU 191 JA [Directed Study] 
Beginning Japanese 

Prof. Peter Chang 

Study is based on the techniques of modern 
scientific linguistics for beginning students, using 
the method of guided imitation and aiming at the 
control of the language through memorization and 
manipulation of whole utterances. In addition to 
basic dialogues, there are detailed grammatical 
notes, conversations, and narrative selections. 
Evaluation will be based on progress made in the 
seven scheduled conferences. There will be two 
exams, oral and written. 



CCU 217 CI 
Intermediate Chinese 

Prof. Peter Chang 

This is the first half of second year Chinese; the 
second half is offered in Module II. This course is 
designed to give the student a basic knowledge of 
written Chinese, continued training in its oral use, 
and an introduction to the practice of calligraphy. 
Grammar and syntax are gradually introduced, 
combined with reading, memorization, dictation, 
and translation exercises. Exposure to Chinese 
culture is continued. Independent laboratory 
practice in addition to scheduled language 
laboratory training is available 
Prerequisite: CCU 118 CI or its equivalent. 



CCU 291/2 JA [Directed Study] 
Intermediate Japanese I & II 

Prof. Peter Chang 

This course is intended for the student who either 
has had a good start in spoken Japanese from having 
lived in Japan, or who has had the equivalent of a 
year's academic instruction in spoken Japanese and 
who has demonstrated the motivation and maturity 
to keep a regular language laboratory schedule and 
to make systematic progress using textbook drills 
and explanations. Writing will be strongly 
emphasized. Students who follow the text closely 
should be able to get a sound basic knowledge of 
writing Japanese. 



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ecu 

ecu 291 [Directed Study] 
Chinese Calligraphy 

Prof. Peter Chang 

This course requires a thorough study of the origin, 
history, classification, and significance of Chinese 
characters. Study will include familiarization with 
the structure and technique of four established 
styles: Regular, Cursive, Official, and Seal. The text 
is Peter Chang, Chinese Calligraphy In Four Styles. 
Students are required to buy Chinese brushes and 
regular drawing ink under the direction of the 
Instructor. Evaluation will be based upon studio 
work, which should be handed in periodically. 

ecu 391 [Directed Study] 
Chinese Drama 

Prof. Peter Chang 

A literary as well as a theatrical approach to the 
study of Chinese drama, this study includes a general 
examination of conventions, costumes, history, 
make-up techniques, stage direction, and styles of 
acting. A final production in the Bininger Center for 
Performing Arts or in some other auditorium may be 
presented. The evaluation will be based upon oral 
reports in seven scheduled conferences and a final 
paper of about ten pages. There will be a midterm 
and final examination. 



FRENCH 

ecu 113 FR [Modes of Learning] 
ecu 114 FR 
Elementary French 

Prof. Henry Cenz 

Through the extensive use of films, this course is 
designed to give the student a basic facility in 
fourskills: listening comprehension, speaking, 
reading, and writing. In addition to regular class 
sessions, there will be listening and speaking 
practice in the laboratory. Films integrated with the 
textbook will be used throughout the course. 
Evaluation will be based on bi-weekly tests, 
mid-term and final examinations, and class 
participation. 

ecu 213 FR 
ecu 214 FR 
Intermediate French 

Prof. Henry Cenz 

Study will include reading of short stories, essays, 
excerpts of novels, grammar review, lab practice, 
and films. Emphasis will be on the simultaneous 
development of the four language skills; speaking. 



oral comprehension, reading, and writing. Special 
arrangements may be made for students who desire 
an intensive reading or speaking emphasis, coupled 
with a review of grammar. Evaluation will be based 
on bi-weekly tests, mid-term and final exams, and an 
outside project. 

Prerequisites: Two courses of college French or two 
years of high school French. 

ecu 429 FR 

French Literature of The 18th Century 

Prof. Henry Cenz 

This is a study of the more important literary figures 
of the period including Voltaire, Rousseau, Prevost, 
Condillac, Buffon, and Montesquieu. In addition to 
lectures and discussion, there will be "explication de 
textes," and oral reports based on outside readings. 
Evaluation will be based on class participation, a 
term paper, and midterm and final examinations. 
Prerequisites: 18 semester hours of college French or 
equivalent. [This course is offered in French. ] 
For other French courses see Letters Collegium. 

GERMAN 

ecu 111 GR [Modes of Learning] 

ecu 112 GR 

German Conversation Through Film I, II 

Prof. Kenneth Keeton 

Elementary German conversation presents the 
language through filmed situations which are then 
discussed by two methods: (1) patterning, (2) 
grammatical analysis. The student will choose the 
method appropriate to his need and learning habits. 
Satisfactory completion should enable the student to 
function in a German-speaking country and pursue 
further study of the language and literature. Work to 
be submitted for evaluation; regular quizzes and a 
final oral/written exam. 

Prerequisite for CCU 112 GR is CCU 111 GRor the 
equivalent. 

ecu 221 GR 
CCU 222 GR 
German Conversation Through Film III, IV 

Prof. Kenneth Keeton 

The program consists of 26 filmed episodes which 
provide the basis for structural study of the language 
and continued development of basic skills through 
active use of German in class discussion. The films, 
which were produced in Germany by professional 
actors, offer a valuable introduction to German 



{47) 



culture and life-styles, in addition to native language 
models. Students will be evaluated on the basis of 
class participation, oral and written assignments, 
short quizzes, and a final exam. 
Prerequisite: CCU 111-112 CR or the equivalent. 

ecu 321 GR 

Advanced Composition and Conversation 

Staff 

This course is intended to increase facility and 
fluency in German. Students will follow the readings 
and exercises in Feix & Schlant's Gesprache, 
Diskussionen, Aufsatze which concentrates on those 
errors most commonly made by beginning speakers 
of German. There will be class discussions in 
German, brief oral assignments based on timely 
subjects, and a systematic effort to learn effective 
use of idioms. 

Prerequisite: Four courses of college German or the 
equivalent. 

CCU 325 GR 
CCU 326 GR 
An Introduction to German Literature 

Prof Kenneth Keeton 

The intent of German 325 is to present a general 
overview of German literature from its recorded 
beginning to the present. Works included will be 
studied as art and as historical reflections of their 
particular time, to enable the student to develop his 
literary perspective on the artistic and historic levels. 
Criteria for evaluation will include class 
participation and a midterm and final examination. 
CCU 222 GR or its equivalent is recommended. 

CCU 331 GR 

The Novels of Hermann Hesse 

Prof. Kenneth Keeton 

This course will focus on the novels of Hermann 
Hesse in German or English. Class discussion will be 
led by students, and individual students will act as 
the resource persons for a particular novel. A final 
term paper that must be comparative in nature and a 
"take-home" final exam will be the criteria for 
evaluation. 

CCU 391 GR [Directed Study] 
German Phonetics 

Prof. Kenneth Keeton 

This is directed study through text and tapes by 
native speakers. Students learn phonetic alphabet, 
speech patterning, and inflection of High German 
through written and oral example. The final exam 
consists of both oral and written transcription from 



Roman script to phonetics and from phonetic to 
Roman. This course is required of future teachers of 
German. W. Kuhlmann, German Pronunciation, 
translated and edited by D. Nichols and K. Keeton, 
will be the text. 

HISTORY 

CCU 152 HI 

Europe in Transition: 1492-1914 

Prof. William Parsons 

Emphasis in this course will be placed on the 
following topics within this chronological frame- 
work: 1) The Age of Exploration and the Expansion of 
Europe, 2) The Protestant Revolution, 3) The 
Scientific and Intellectual Revolutions, 4) The 
French Revolution and Napoleon, 5) Europe in the 
Nineteenth Century. Students will submit several 
short written and/or oral reports in which they will 
explore the more general European trends as they 
relate to a specific national or regional area. For this 
reason, the course is recommended for students of 
French, German, and Russian studies. 

CCU 252 HI 

Modern Russia and the Soviet Union 

Prof. William Parsons 

Russia in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries will 
be the subject matter for this course. Special 
consideration will be given to the following topics: 
1) Imperial Russia in the nineteenth century; 2) the 
Russian revolutionary tradition; 3) continuity and 
change in Russian and Soviet history; 4) the Soviet 
Union as a totalitarian society; and 5) the Soviet 
Union as a world power. Criteria for evaluation will 
include participation in discussion, several short 
papers, and a final exam. 
For other History courses please see the Letters 
Collegium. 



LITERATURE 

CCU 136 LI 

Nineteenth Century Russian Novel in Translation 

Prof. Vivian Parsons 

Russian writers in the nineteenth century produced 
many great novels culminating in the world master- 
pieces of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky. This course will 
examine representative works of this great tradition 
including. the following: Lermontov: Hero of Our 
Time; Gogol: Dead Souls; Goncharov: Oblomov; 
Turgenev: Fathers and Sons; Tolstoy: Anna 
Karenina; Dostoevsky: Crime and Punishment. 
Several short novels will also be considered. Two 



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papers will be required: a) an analysis of a novel not 
discussed in class, b) a more general treatment of 
two or more of the novels discussed in class. 

LTR 186 LI [Modes of Learning] 
Literary Studies: Comparative 

Prof. Howard Carter 

For description please see Letters Collegium 

ecu 329 LI 

Chinese Literature in English Translation 

Prof. Tennyson Chang 

This course is a selective study of the Chinese 
masterworks through representative readings in 
English translations or writings on the classical or 
vernacular literature. A series of introductory 
lectures will be given by the instructor,followed by' 
student presentations of book reports, creative 
writings, and discussions. Student participation, 
presentation, and contribution to class work, and 
discussion, research, and outside studies will be 
taken into consideration for evaluation. Enrollment 
is open to all interested students. 

ecu 331 LI 

Life and Works of Herman Hesse 

Prof. Kennetti Keeton 

For description, please see CCU 331 GR. 

ecu 491 LI [Directed Study] 

CCU 491 SP [Directed Study] * 

The Artistry of Federico Garcia Lorca 

Prof. Pedro Trakas 

This project will study and analyze art forms en- 
gaged in by Lorca, with reading of his major literary 
works. Each student will write a term paper on some 
aspect of Lorca's artistry. The works read and the 
term paper will be in Spanish for students who have 
successfully completed Intermediate Spanish or its 
equivalent. They will be in English for students who 
have had less or no Spanish. 

For other Literature courses please see Creative Arts 
and Letters Collegia. 

PHILOSOPHY 

CCU 191/2 PL [Directed Study] 
Ethics I, II 

Prof . Ashby Johnson 

The program is designed as an introduction to 
systems of moral philosophy. Readings are drawn 
from primary sources and from commentaries. An 
extensive bibliography is provided in the syllabus, 
but the two texts referred to most extensively are 
Reason and Goodness by Brand Blanchard, and A 



Critical Introduction To Ethics by Philip 
Wheelwright. The syllabus provides study guides for 
the materials of the course. Three major papers and 
a written examination furnish the basis for 
evaluation. Although there are no prerequisites, 
some background in philosophy is desirable. 

CCU 254 PL 

Political and Social Philosophy 

Prof. Ashby Johnson 

The purpose of the course is to develop a familiarity 
with the major theories of civil order which have 
been influential in Western Europe and America. 
Contemporary political theory is examined in the 
light of classical tradition and historical movements. 
The two primary texts are Somerville and Santoni, 
Social and Political Philosophy (selected readings) 
and William T. Bluhm, Theories of the Political 
System. Evaluation is based on class participation, 
two tests, one term paper, and an examination. 
For other Philosophy courses see Creative Arts and 
Letters Collegia. 

RELIGION 

CCU 181 RE [Modes of Learning] 
Man's Search for Ultimate Reality 

Prof. Alan Carlsten 

This course will be an inquiry into methods of the 
study of religion phenomena. It will deal with the 
interpretation and understanding of sacred writings, 
archaeological data and anthropological findings. 
The course will stress the phenomenological method 
of inquiry, which is a way of describing and 
analyzing religious phenomena while not evaluating 
such phenomena in terms of their truth value. 
Primitive as well as contemporary religions will be 
studied, and the significance of symbol, myth, and 
cultic action will be examined and evaluated. 

CCU 183 RE [Modes of Learning] 
Religion in Non-Western Cultures 

Prof. Gilbert Johnston 

This course views religion as a fundamental aspect in 
the study of other cultures. The purpose will be to 
identify and cultivate those skills of perception, 
judgment, and communication that may be most 
useful in leading to an understanding of the religious 
aspects of a culture. Illustrative material will be 
taken from the beliefs, practices, and symbolic 
imagery of Asian and African religions. Students will 
be expected to demonstrate what they have learned 
in actual practice situations in which they will be 
confronted with religious phenomena in a variety of 
forms. Oral and written reports will be submitted 
throughout the term as well as one longer paper, 



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ecu 262 RE 

Asian Religions: East Asia 

Prof. Gilbert Johnston 

Religion, philosophy, psychology, and traditional 
morality blend together in the East Asian countries in 
ways that make it difficult and probably pointless to 
try to study religion as a separate and distinct 
phenomenon. Therefore, this course focuses on 
those classical cultural traditions in China and Japan 
that have contributed to a view of the world and of 
man's place in it, the nature of human society, and 
the proper forms of human behavior. Some attention 
will also be given to issues arising from present-day 
attempts to adapt Eastern religious beliefs and 
practices to the American milieu. 
Prerequisite: Religion [intermediate] or equivalent. 

ecu 263 RE 

Christian Thought and Practice Through 

The Centuries 

Prof. Alan Carlsten 

This course will offer an intensive study of the 
beliefs, behavior patterns, and institutional 
structures of the Christian Church throughout her 
twenty centuries of existence. Attention will be 
given to the great theological debates, the develop- 
ment of the episcopacy, and the problems of Church 
and State. The significance of the monastic 
movement and the Reformation wil be studied in 
depth. The course concludes with an assessment of 
post-Vatican II Christendom. Evaluation will be 
based upon three one-hour examinations, class 
participation, and a brief paper. 

ecu 264 RE 

ecu 291 RE [Directed Study] 

Religion in America 

Prof. Alan Carlsten 

Religion in America is perhaps the most interesting 
phenomenon in all of religious history. Only in 
America have Christianity and Judaism assumed the 
unique forms which they manifest in that culture. 
There is much more than an ocean which separates 
the European Catholic and Protestant from their 
American counterparts. The same is true of the 
difference between the old world Jew and his fellow 
believer in America. These courses will analyze and 
evaluate the beliefs, behavior, and institutions of 
religion in America thereby enabling students to 
appreciate the tremendous significance of religion in 
the American experience. Evaluation will be based 
upon three one-hour examinations, class 
participation, and a brief paper. 

For other Religion courses see Letters Collegium. 



RUSSIAN 

ecu 121 RU [Modes of Learning] 
ecu 122 RU 
Elementary Russian 

Prof. Vivian Parsons 

These courses offer intensive drill in understanding, 
speaking, reading, and writing grammatical and 
conversational patterns of modern Russian. There 
will be reading from simple Russian prose the latter 
part of the course. Textbooks and readers will be 
used. Work to be submitted for evaluation: written 
exercises, exams. 



ecu 221 RU 
ecu 222 RU 
Intermediate Russian 

Prof. Vivian Parsons 

These are courses in review and completion of 

basic Russian grammar, and continued work on 

conversational skills. Textbooks and readers will be 

used. Work to be submitted for evaluation: written 

exercises, exams. 

Prerequisites: Completion of Beginning Russian. 



ecu 223 RU 
Readings in Russian 

Prof. Vivian Parsons 

This course offers its student rapid acquisition of 
vocabulary through extensive readings in Russian in 
the general area of the student's primary academic 
interest, and continued review of grammar and 
conversational skills. Textbooks and readers will be 
used. Work to be submitted for evaluation: written 
exercises, exams. 

Prerequisite: Completion of Intermediate Russian. 



ecu 321 RU 

Introduction To Russian Literature and Culture 

Prof. William Parsons 

This course deals with Russian cultural heritage and 
the current Soviet way of life. It surveys Russian 
literature from Pushkin to Solzhenitsyn, with 
readings, written assignments, special lectures, and 
discussions to be done primarily in Russian. There is 
continued review of grammar and conversational 
skills. 



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SPANISH 

ecu 115 SP [Modes of Learning] 
ecu 116 SP 
Elementary Spanish 

Prof. Pedro Trakas 

These courses offer intensive drill in understanding, 
speaking, reading, and writing Spanish. Vocabulary 
is presented through dialogues, film strips, and 
varied exercises. There will be short speeches once a 
week, and independent laboratory practice is 
required. At the end of each week, there will be a 
review and test based on the entire week's work, and 
there will be a midterm and final exam. 
There is no prerequisite for CCU 115 SP. Prerequisite 
for CCU 776 SP is successful completion of CCU 
7 75 SP or its equivalent. 

CCU 115 SP [Modes of Learning] 

CCU 116 SP 
Beginning Spanish I, II 

Prof. Frank Figueroa 

These courses offer intensive drill in understanding, 
speaking, and writing Spanish. Vocabulary is pre- 
sented through dialogues and varied exercises. There 
will be short speeches once a week, and 
independent laboratory practice in addition to two 
weekly scheduled laboratory classes. At the end of 
each week, there will be a review and test based on 
the entire week's work. 

Prerequisites: None for CCU 115 SP; successful 
completion of CCU 115 SPor its equivalent is 
prerequisite for CCU 7 76 SP. 

CCU 215 SP 
Intermediate Spanish I 

Prof. Frank Figueroa 

This course is a continuation of CCU 115-116 SP. The 

entire first semester is spent in intensive review of 

grammar. The dialogues are followed by specific and 

general questions, and idioms are presented in a 

variety of exercises. Independent laboratory practice 

on a weekly basis is required as absolutely essential 

for rapid comprehension and correctness of 

expression. 

Prerequisite: CCU 115-116SPor its equivalent. 

CCU 216 SP 
Intermediate Spanish II 

Prof. Frank Figueroa 

This is an introduction to literature to be used as a 
basis for improvement in understanding, speaking, 
reading, and writing. Books read will include essays, 
two plays, and a novel. Texts: Altabe, Temas y 



dialogos; B. Vallejo, Dos dramas de Buero Vallejo; 

P. Galdos, La sombra. Evaluation will be on the basis 
of weekly tests, mid-term examination, and labora- 
tory participation. 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of CCU 215 SP 
or its equivalent. 

CCU 315 SP 

CCU 316 SP 
Advanced Spanish I, II 

Prof. Frank Figueroa 

Advanced Spanish I centers around a common class 
experience followed by individualized instruction 
focusing on particular interests of smaller groups. All 
students will develop their reading and writing skills 
in Spanish by working in Spanish composition 
through literature. The class will then subdivide 
itself according to interest in areas such as colloquial 
Spanish, commercial Spanish, Spanish for translators 
and interpreters, further literary study, and ad- 
vanced composition. Spanish II is a sequel to 
Spanish I. 

Prerequisite: Competency in Spanish) at thie second 
year level of college study or completion of CCU 
216 SP. 

CCU 423 SP 
Golden Age Drama 

Prof. Pedro Trakas 

This course offers reading and analysis of some of 
the most representative plays of the period, includ- 
ing works by Lope, Tirso, Calderon, Alarcon, Castro, 
Moreto, Cervantes, Rojas Zorrilla, and Mira de 
Amescua. There will be a midterm examination and 
a term paper of 15 to 25 pages in length in lieu of a 
final exam. All work will be in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: Successful completion of CCU 
315-316 SP or its equivalent. 

CCU 424 SP 
Modern Spanish Drama 

Prof. Pedro Trakas 

A study of the works of the best modern playwrights 
from Benavente to the present. This course is recom- 
mended for those contemplating a Hispanic Area 
Studies major or a Spanish language major. Students 
will prepare three questions and answers on each 
play, to be discussed weekly. There will be a 
midterm exam on work done up to that point. Each 
student will submit at the end of the semester a 
15-25 page term paper concerning some aspect of 
modern Spanish drama. All work will be in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced 
Spanish CCU 315-316 SP, or its equivalent. 



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ecu 491 SP [Directed Study] 
The Artistry of Federico Garcia Lorca 

Prof. Pedro Trakas 

For description, please see CCU 491 LI . 



SWEDISH 

ecu 191 SW [Directed Study] 
Swedish I 

Prof. Alan Carlsten 

This course offers intensive drill in understanding, 
speaking, reading, and writing of Swedish. A taped 
program of 40 lessons prepared by the Swedish 
government forms the basis of the course. Textbooks 
which accompany the tapes are also prepared by the 
Swedish government. Material to be used: Radio 
Sweden Taped Program and texts: Walter Johnson, 
Beginning Swedish. Work to be submitted for evalu- 
ation will consist of quizzes and a final examination 
(both written and oral). 



CCU 291 SW [Directed Study] 
Swedish II 

Prof. Alan Carlsten 

This course offers advanced Swedish grammar and 
writing. There will be continuous drill in understand- 
ing and speaking as well. Recorded broadcasts of 
Radio Sweden will be used in laboratory work. 
Selected short stories will provide skill in reading. 
Materials to be used: Martin Soderback, Advanced 
Spoken Swedish; Radio Sweden taped broadcasts. 
Evaluation will consist of quizzes and an oral and 
written final exam. 
Prerequisite: Swedish I. 



CCU 391 SW [Directed Study] 
Swedish III 

Prof. Alan Carlsten 

This course offers intensive study of Swedish literary 
figures. Selma Lagerlof, Strindberg, Lagerkvist, and 
Bergman will be read in Swedish. Stockholm's 
Dagens Nyheter (Sunday edition) will be read also. 
Conversation and writing skills will be emphasized. 
Materials to be used: Par Lagerkvist, Barabbas; 
Bodelin; Ahsuerus. Selma Lagerlof, Jerusalem; I 
Dalarna; August Strindberg, Sammolta Skrifter. 
Evaluation will be based on papers and examination. 
Prerequisite: Swedish II. 



COLLEGIUM OF 
BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE 

COLLEGIUM COURSES 

BES 260 
Statistical Methods 

Profs, lack Williams and William Martin 
This course introduces the principles of descriptive 
and inferential statistics. It has two fundamental 
goals: (a) to develop in each student an intuitive 
understanding of basic statistical principles and (b) 
to teach each student how to apply statistical 
principles and techniques to real-life situations in a 
reasoned and relatively sophisticated fashion. 
Prerequisite: A behavioral science modes of learning 
course [BES 180, 182, or 182]; or sophomore, junior, 
or senior status; or permission of the instructor. This 
course [or its equivalent] is required for all students 
with concentrations in the behavioral sciences. 

BES 360 
Research Design 

Prof, lack Williams 

The first segment of this course will be devoted to 
some basic issues in the philosophy of science: vis: 
the characteristics of a researchable question and 
the nature of proof. The second section will deal 
with the development of researchable theory: de- 
ductive and inductive theory construction and the 
derivation of propositions and hypotheses. The third 
segment will cover methods and problems in data 
collection: operationalization of variables, sampling 
quantitative and qualitative data, and problems in 
the reliability and validity of data. 
Prerequisites are an introductory course in any of the 
behavioral sciences and a basic statistics course. 

BES 380 VS 
Colloquium: Public Policy 

Prof. Marvin Bentley 

This course is designed to accommodate juniors or 
seniors who want to relate their preparation in the 
behavioral sciences to contemporary questions of 
public policy. For example, subjects such as criminal 
justice, public health, and public education may be 
studied in this course. Students will make oral 
reports to the seminar on issues they select to study. 
Formal papers will be prepared by seminar members. 
Designated students will read the papers in advance 
and discuss the papers before the entire class. 
Informal sessions will be held on problems related to 
selecting research topics, reading the literature, and 
developing questions that can be handled reason- 
ably in the space of a semester course. 



(El 



BES 381 VS 

Colloquium in Social Psychology 

Prof. T. M. Dembroski 

This course is designed to acquaint the student both 
with basic methodological procedures in social 
psychology and with subject matter of current 
interest in which sophisticated research has been 
conducted. Such topics as aggression, persuasion, 
prejudice, interpersonal attraction, and conformity 
will be examined in an attempt to understand the 
forces that affect such social behavior. Special 
attention will be devoted to examining ethical and 
human value considerations in the work. 
Prerequisite is an introductory course in psychology. 

BES 383 VS 

Colloquium: Political Ideology 

Prof, lack Williams 

This course has two goals. The first is to familiarize 
the student with theory and research in the areas of 
personality and politics, and the social psychology 
of political behavior. The second is to lead the 
student to a systematic investigation and 
development of his or her own political beliefs and 
values. Students will be evaluated on the basis of 
two exams and a paper. The exams will reflect the 
content of books and lectures. The paper is to be a 
fairly elaborate and systematic development of the 
student's own political ideology. 

BES 388 VS 
Colloquium: Utopias 

Prof. Tom Oberhofer 

The purpose of this colloquium is to give students 
the opportunity to study, discuss, and design 
Utopian systems. In addition to class discussions of 
basic Utopian writings, students will form task 
groups to study and design components of an overall 
Utopian system. These task groups will address 
themselves to such diverse topics as education, in- 
terpersonal relations, political structures, economic 
organization, housing, family and child rearing, 
environment, leisure and recreation, etc. Evaluation 
will be based on class participation and the research- 
design project. 

BES 480 VS 

Colloquium: Managerial Theory and Practice 

Prof. Sandra Wilson 

The emphasis of this course (juniors and seniors 
only) will be in the realm of values in managerial 
decision-making. The class will begin with an 
analysis of categories of values and processes used 
to sustain and define values in different categories. 



There will be discussions of practical problems 
where decisions involve diverse values. There will be 
an effort made to relate abstractions such as "truth" 
and "justice" to competition and pluralism. The 
main thrust of the course is to assess the role of the 
individual in organizational and interorganizational 
relationships from the perspective of personal and 
institutional values. 

BES 482 VS 

Colloquium: Models of Mental Disorder 

and Treatment 

Prof. Wesley Harper 

This colloquium will have two components: (1) 
learning about different models of mental disorder 
and treatment and (2) exploring some of their 
assumptions and value implications. How do differ- 
ent psychotherapeutic methods affect and help 
define individuals' rights to behave as they will and 
social units' rights to protect their members by 
proscribing certain behaviors? How is it decided 
whether behavior is illegal, immoral, psychopatho- 
logical, simply undesirable, or some combination of 
these? To what extent do therapists impose their 
value standards on their clients? 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

BES 482 VS 

Colloquium in Applied Sociology 

Staff 

Description will be available in a supplement to be 

published in the fall. 

BES 484 VS 

Colloquium: Deviance and Disorganization 

Prof. William Martin 

This course examines the social sources of deviance 
and disorganization. It focuses on the alternative 
value systems that underlie what society labels as 
deviant or disorganized. Major theories and research 
in both individual and societal deviance/ 
disorganization will be examined, and issues of 
value consensus, value conflict, and 
individual-society rehabilitation will be discussed. 
The course will emphasize the viability of alternative 
value systems in coping with a dominant social 
structure and seriously question the universality of 
presently prevailing norms of prosocial behaviors 
and social systems. 

BES 485 VS 

Colloquium: Physical Anthropology 

Prof, loan Barnett 

This course will be a combination lab-lecture 

colloquium. The initial class periods will focus on 



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early concerns with evolution and fossil hominids 
(apes and men). Aside from the fossil forms and 
evolutionary hierarchy leading to the origin of 
modern man, we shall be concerned with 
controversies engendered by nineteenth and 
twentieth century studies by physical 
anthropologists. Lab sessions will be geared to 
exploration of differences among fossils as well as 
differences among present-day human 
types. prerequ/s/fes for the course are at least one 
course in anthropology, sociology, or biology; and 
uppperclass standing. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

BES 230 AN 

The Nature of Human Adaptation 

Prof, loan Barnett 

Unlike non-human animals, man adapts culturally as 
well as physically. Nevertheless, man's ability to 
adjust to his environment has roots in his biological 
heritage. In this course we seek to examine those 
physical features which afford humans the capacity 
to adapt culturally. Human evolution as evidenced 
by the acquisition of culture, language, and social 
organization will be dealt with in depth. A paper and 
a final exam are required for purposes of evaluation. 

BES 333 AN 
Contemporary Pacific Cultures 

Prof, loan Barnett 

Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia are areas of 
the world not generally known in depth to most 
people. Yet culturally speaking, the island civili- 
zations collectively comprising Pacific society are of 
great importance to individuals concerned with 
history, demography, and cultural and physical 
differentiation among isolated groups. In this course 
we hope to explore fully the cultural and historical 
backgrounds of the peoples of the Pacific, concen- 
trating on preliterate groups. Attention will be given 
to problems facing these stone age societies living a 
marginal existence in the twentieth century. 
Prerequisite: One introductory course in either 
sociology or anthropology. 

BES 336 AN 

The New Archaeology 

Prof, loan Barnett 

Contemporary archaeological concerns are not so 
much with types of artifacts as with the significance 
of artifacts and other objects of material culture for 
understanding man as a social being in a given en- 
vironment. The course will focus on the application 
of archaeological methods and theory as they 



pertain to reconstruction of culture history and 
analysies of cultural process in an ecological frame- 
work. Evaluation will be made on the basis of one 
paper and an essay exam. 

Prerequisite: One introductory anthropology course 
or permission of the instructor. 

BES 436 AN 

History of Anthropological Theory 

Prof, loan Barnett 

This course examines various schools of thought 
which have grown out of attempts to explain man's 
evolution, physical variation, and socio-cultural 
diversity. Assessments of Boasian anthropology, 
functionalism, structuralism, Darwinism, and 
cultural ecology, and the contributions of those 
ideologies to the shaping of anthropological theory, 
will constitute the main foci for the course. The 
second half of the course will be devoted to 
examining new trends of theoretical interest to 
archaeologists, linguists, physical anthropologists, 
and cultural anthropologists. 
Prerequisites: one course in anthropology, and 
sophomore, junior, or senior standing. 
For other Anthropology courses see Comparative 
Cultures Collegium. 



ECONOMICS 

BES 251 EC 

Principles of Microeconomics 

Prof. Tom Oberhofer 

This course will develop basic principles of price 
theory and focus on their application. We will study 
the operation of markets and illustrate with 
examples of recent farm and energy problems. We 
will discuss industrial structure and pricing of output 
under different competitive structures. We will 
consider cost-benefit analysis and apply it to 
environmental quality decisions. Other topics 
covered include economics of education and crime. 
There will be two one-hour tests and a final exam. 
This course is required of all students concentrating 
in economics. 

BES 252 EC 

Principles of Macroeconomics 

Prof. Tom Oberhofer 

This is an introductory course in income theory. It 
includes an analysis of the elements which comprise 
the national income and the role of the state in 
maintaining a high level of income and employment 
without inflation. Special attention is given to 
monetary and fiscal policy. We will develop a model 



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of the economy and use it to study recent problems 
of inflation, recession, and balance of payments 
deficits. There will be two one-hour tests and a final 
exam. This course is required of all students 
concentrating in economics. 

BES 351 EC 

Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 

Prof. Tom Oberhofer 

This is a continuation of Principles of Microeco- 
nomics. Pricing and output decisions under various 
degrees of competition and monopoly are 
approached with the use of simple mathematical 
models and with such tools as indifference curves 
and isoquants. Particular attention is given to total- 
average-marginal relationships. Two one-hour tests 
and a final examination will serve as basis for 
evaluation. 

Prerequisite: Principles of Microeconomics. This 
course is required for ail students concentrating in 
economics. 

BES 352 EC 

Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory 

Prof. Marvin Bentiey 

This course covers the basic determinants of 
aggregate demand and aggregate supply. The course 
is divided into three main parts: first, national 
income accounts; second, a static analysis of the 
aggregate market for goods and services using the 
LM-IS approach; and third, the applications of 
macro theory to the problems of domestic stabiliza- 
tion and the balance of payments. Evaluation will be 
based on several tests and a final exam. 
Prerequisite: BES 252, Principles of 
Macroeconomics. 



BES 356 EC 
Money and Banking 

Prof. Marvin Bentiey 

In this course attention will be given to the structure 
of commercial banking in the United States; how the 
structure evolved; and what sort of functions banks 
perform in today's modern market economy. The 
course also will deal with monetary theory and with 
international monetary institutions like the Inter- 
national Monetary Fund. The goal is for students to 
learn the structure and functions of commercial 
banks and to broaden their understanding of a 
money economy. Evaluation will be based on per- 
formance on three semester tests plus a final exam. 
Students should have taken at least one basic course 
in economics before taking this course. 



BES 358 EC 
Economic Development 

Prof. Tom Oberhofer 

This course will focus on the problems faced by 
economically developing countries. It has two 
general goals: 1) to explore the factors which con- 
tribute to or retard the process of economic 
development and 2) to investigate how domestic and 
international resources can be utilized effectively in 
pursuit of development goals. The course will 
investigate noneconomic (i.e., cultural, political) as 
well as traditional economic aspects of develop- 
ment. Evaluation will be based on class participa- 
tion, a paper, and tests. 

Prerequisites are BES 251 and 252 or permission of 
the instructor. It is recommended that students who 
elect this course consider also enrolling in BES 340 
PO, Political Development in Modernizing Nations. 



BES 354 EC 
Managerial Economics 

Prof. Marvin Bentiey 

The emphasis of this course is upon applying 
theoretical economics to problems faced by 
managers of private business. A number of case 
studies will be used, and business simulation games 
will cover some areas of the subject. The goal is to 
improve the students' knowledge of the problems 
business managers must cope with and to give the 
students skills in using economic tools as aids in 
resolving these problems. Evaluation will be based 
upon performance on case studies and quizzes. 
Students taking this course should have had a course 
in Principles of Economics, preferably BES 251, 
Principles of Microeconomics. 



BES 456 EC 

History of Economic Thought 

Prof. Tom Oberhofer 

The purpose of this course is to trace the evolution 
of economic ideas as developed and expounded by 
Western economists. The course will demonstrate 
the linkage between changing economic ideas and 
changing socio-political conditions. The student will 
familiarize himself with the teachings of the mer- 
chantilists, the physiocrats, Adam Smith, Malthus, 
Ricardo, Mill, Marx, Marshall, and the German and 
American schools of thought. Evaluation will be 
based on class participation, a paper, and tests. 
Prerequisites are BES 251 and 252 or permission of 
the instructor. 



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BES 458 EC 
International Economics 

Prof. Marvin Bentley 

This course presents a consideration of international 
trade and international finance theory and policy. 
The balance of international payments, exchange- 
rate adjustment, the nature of the gains from trade, 
and U. S. commercial policy are among the principal 
topics included. The basic text is Snider, Introduc- 
tion to International Economics (5th ed.). In 
addition there will be library reading and written 
reports. Two one-hour tests and a final examination 
will serve as criteria for evaluation. 
Prerequisites are BES 251 and 252. 

MANAGEMENT 

BES 201 MN 

The Managerial Enterprise 

Prof. Sandra Wilson 

This course provides an introduction to the basic 
concepts, theories, and practices of modern 
management. Through lecture/discussions, 
classroom exercises, and case-study analysis, the 
areas of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, 
and controlling will be investigated. There is one 
required text: Massie and Douglas, Managing: A 
Contemporary Approach. Evaluation will be based 
upon class participation, case-study analysis, 
intermittent quizzes, and a final examination. 

BES 205 MN 
Principles of Accounting 

Staff 

This course presents a conceptual approach to 
financial accounting through exposure to the 
accounting process and to generally accepted 
procedures. The emphasis is on the nature of 
accounting rather than on procedures, although 
assignments will include practice materials which 
demonstrate procedures essential to the 
understanding of the accounting cycle. Evaluation 
will be based on assigned problems, quizzes and a 
final examination, and a practice case. 
Prerequisite is sophomore, junior, or senior status. 
This course is required for students concentrating in 
management. 

BES 301 MN 

The Dynamics of Group Leadership 

Prof. Sandra Wilson 

This course is designed as an introduction to the 
nature of groups. This overview will help the 
individual who wants to develop leadership skills to 



understand the behavior of man as he interacts with 
fellow humans. The degree to which each student is 
successful in the development of the skills will rest 
primarily upon the student's basic knowledge of the 
nature of groups and the psychological and social 
forces associated with group behavior. Evaluation 
will be based on class participation, intermittent 
quizzes, and a comprehensive final examination. 
This course is recommended as an elective for all 
management majors. 

BES 401 MN 

Group Leadership Practicum 

Prof. Sandra Wilson 

This course is a sequel to BES 301 MN, Dynamics of 
Croup Leadership. The emphasis will be on applying 
the knowledge obtained from an intensive study of 
theoretically significant empirical research. Specific 
areas of focus include fifteen concepts central to 
Organizational Psychology and the "human side of 
enterprise." Accompanying the exploration of each 
concept will be an exercise in a classroom 
simulation. Required reading: Kolb, Organizational 
Psychology; a Book of Readings, and An Experi- 
mental Approach. Evaluation will be based on class 
participation, intermittent quizzes, and a compre- 
hensive final examination. 

Prerequisites: BES 301 MN and either BES 182 PS or 
BES 180 SO. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

BES 184 PO [Modes of Learning] 
international Politics 

Prof. Timothy Gamelin 

This course deals with fundamental principles of 
politics, focusing on bargaining behavior among the 
nation-states of the modern world. The course will 
deal not only with what we know about international 
politics but also with how behavioral scientists seek 
to increase that understanding. The course exposes 
the student to traditional and empirical research in 
the field, to laboratory experiences which simulate 
elements of international political bargaining, and to 
contemporary issues of international conflict and 
cooperation. 

BES 340 PO 

Political Development in Modernizing Nations 

Prof. Timothy Gamelin 

This course probes the dynamics of modernizing 
societies. The course begins with a close look at 
economic, social, and psychological behavior 
changes which accompany the rapid increase in 



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man's knowledge and in his consequent ability to 
control his environment. Problems of increasing or 
maintaining governmental capabilities within the 
Latin American, Asian, and African nations which 
are undergoing this modernization process then will 
be examined. Finally, the implications that the 
struggle for political development has for 
international politics will be noted. It is 
recommended that students who elect this course 
also consider registering for BES 358 EC, Economic 
Development. 

BES 347 PO 
Comparative Political Parties 

Prof. Anne Murphy 

In this course we will search for the links between 
the individual citizen and political leaders and 
government, and learn how political parties under- 
take to aggregate public demands and mobilize 
support. We will also examine party systems in 
various developed nations and take note of the role 
of parties in emerging nations. Evaluation will be on 
class participation, on reports covering a substantial 
.amount of outside reading, and on either a research 
paper or an examination. 

Prerequisite: two courses in politics, government, 
sociology, history, or anthropology. 

BES 349 PO 

The States in the Federal System 

Prof. Anne Murphy 

This course examines the variety and similarities of 
the fifty states; the partnership and tensions between 
national and state governments; the sharing of 
responsibilities and innovation; and the role of the 
state as a unit in political parties, legislative ma- 
neuver, and presidential politics. Students will be 
evaluated on the basis of tests, participation in class, 
class reports based on outside reading which will be 
assigned periodically, a term paper, and a final 
examination. 

There is no prerequisite, but one previous course in 
politics or government is recommended. 

BES 440' PO 

International Conflict and Crisis Behavior 

Prof. Timothy Camel in 

Why can't we have a world without international 
conflict? What goals or motives lead nations to war? 
What are the consequences of nuclear growth and 
proliferation? In this course, international conflict 
and war are examined first as the outcome of 
rational, cost-calculating behavior, then as a conse- 
quence of distorted perceptions and irrational 
actions arising during crisis situations. The above 



topics are examined largely through behavioral 
research. The behavioral principles will be illustrated 
through classroom simulations and through readings 
on selected twentieth century wars and crises. 
Prerequisite is a behavioral science modes-of- 
learning course or permission of the instructor. 

BES 444 PO 

The Politics of Poverty 

Prof. Anne Murphy 

This course is an intense theoretical study of the U.S. 
war against poverty and of the attempts to involve 
the poor in policy formation. We will study a variety 
of political topics, including Marxian theory of the 
Proletariat; organizational and communications 
problems; and urban and federal politics and policy. 
Reading and research reports, a project paper, and 
an exam will constitute the basis of evaluation. 
Prerequisites are junior or senior standing plus a 
course in statistical methods or research design. 
For other political science courses see Letters 
Collegium. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

BES 182 PS [Modes of Learning] 
Introduction to Psychology 

Prof. T. M. Dembroski 

This course serves as an introduction to the scientific 
study of psychological processes and behavior. Such 
methods as experimentation, correlation, and obser- 
vation will be covered with an eye to demonstrating 
how psychological knowledge is acquired. A number 
of theoretical approaches to human and anirnal 
behavior will be explored along with the research on 
which the theories are based. Examples of 
psychological processes and behavior that will be 
examined include cognition, learning, emotion, 
aggression, personality, and prejudice. 

BES 310 PS 
Developmental Psychology 

Prof. T. M. Dembroski 

This course covers past and present concepts, 
theories, and research in Developmental 
Psychology. Examples of topics receiving attention 
include early experience, intellectual development, 
social learning, behavioral modification, achieve- 
ment, and morality. A variety of methods (observa- 
tional, correlational, and experimental) will be 
examined in studying the development of both 
human and non-human organisms from conception 
to death. Two or three examinations and class 
participation serve as the basis for evaluation. 
Prerequisite: an introductory course in psychology. 



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BES 312 PS 
Social Psychology 

Prof. T.M.Dembroski 

The course will cover past and present concepts, 
theories, and research in social psychology. 
Examples of topics planned for inclusion include 
social influence, attitudes, persuasion, social 
affiliation, leadership, and prejudice. In addition to 
class participation, students are expected to design 
and conduct an original experiment in social 
psychology as part of a laboratory experience. 
Evaluation will be based on two or three examina- 
tions, class participation, and laboratory work. 
An introduction to psychology and a course in 
statistical methods are prerequisites. 

BES 316 PS 
Psychology of Personality 

Prof. Wesley Harper 

This course will emphasize specific tests and theo- 
retical and research problems in personality. 
Students should leave the course.with the ability to 
1) characterize trait and factor, psychoanalytic, 
behavioral, and phenomenological theories of 
personality; 2) evaluate a typical personality study; 
3) state the assumptions underlying different assess- 
ment techniques and their relationship to particular 
theories of personality; 4) discuss the ethics and 
effectiveness of different uses of psychological tests; 
and 5) describe and evaluate important research 
relevant to personality theories and psychological 
testing. 
Prerequisite: BES 182 or permission of the instructor. 

BES 317 PS 
Psychometrics 

Prof. Wesley Harper 

The main thrust of this course will be to uncover the 
principles of psychological assessment, including 
test construction, reliability, validity, and utility. 
The assumptions underlying such forms of assess- 
ment as the interview, self-report inventories, 
aptitude tests, projective tests, and behavior ratings 
will be stressed, and research relevant to the appli- 
cability of different assessment techniques will be 
considered. 

Prerequsites: BES 182 and BES 260. BES 316, 
Psychology of Personality, is strongly 
recommended. 

BES 319 PS 

Social Learning and Behavior Modification 

Prof. Wesley Harper 

This course will investigate how learning theory has 

been used to analyze and change behavior. Students 



also will have opportunities to apply learning 
principles to practical problems in behavior change 
projects. Major topics to be considered include 
classical conditioning of anxiety and attitudes, 
systematic desensitization, modeling, operant 
conditioning, token economies, punishment, and 
philosophical and ethical issues surrounding 
behavior modification. Evaluation will be based on 
midterm and final examinations and a behavior 
change project. 

Prerequisites are BES 182 and one other course in 
psychology, or consent of instructor. 

BES 391 PS [Directed Study] 
Developmental Psychology 

Prof. T.M.Dembroski 

The course covers past and present concepts, 
theories, and research in Developmental 
Psychology. Topics include early experience, intel- 
lectual development, social learning, behavior 
modification, achievement, and morality. A variety 
of methods (observational, correlational, and 
experimental) will be examined in studying the 
development of both human and nonhuman 
organisms from conception to death. Three examin- 
ations and a research paper serve as the basis for 
evaluation. 

Prerequisites for this course are the Science of 
Individual Behavior or Introduction to Psychology. 

BES 412 PS 

Research Seminar in Social Psychology 

Prof. T. M. Dembroski 

The purpose of this course is to provide an oppor- 
tunity for students to design, conduct, present, and 
write an original piece of research in social 
psychology. The seminar devotes a great deal of 
attention to generating and criticizing research 
ideas. The student is relatively free to select an area 
in social psychology for exploration and 
development. 

Prerequisites are an introduction to psychology 
course, a course in statistics, a course in experiment- 
al psychology, and a course in social psychology. 

BES 416 PS 

Research Seminar in Personality and Inter- 
personal Processes 

Prof. Wesley Harper 

In this seminar students will be able to study specific 
problems of their own choice in the areas of person- 
ality and interpersonal processes. Meetings will 
consist of student summaries of the research litera- 
ture concerning a problem, discussions about 
experimental designs, and reports of the results of 



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Student experiments or field studies. Evaluation will 
be based on a written project report. 
Prerequisites are 7] Experimental Psychology and 2] 
a course in personality, social learning and behavior 
modification, or social psychology. 

for other psychology courses see Creative Arts and 
Natural Sciences Collegia. 



SOCIOLOGY 



social gerontology: theories of aging; research on 
life satisfaction and adjustment to aging; assessment 
of housing, medical, and economic needs of the 
elderly; death and bereavement; and family life. The 
second half focuses on generational conflict and 
continuity: parent-youth conflict, conflicts on 
institutional values, life goal changes, and areas of 
value continuity. Evaluation will be made on a 
written project, two exams, and class participation. 
Prerequisite: an introductory course in sociology. 



BES 180 SO [Modes of Learning] 
Introduction to Sociology 

Prof. William Martin 

The first week of this course deals with the possibil- 
ity of a "science of society" by posing the funda- ' 
mental questions sociologists must answer and by 
examining the applicability of scientific methods to 
those questions. The remainder of the course is 
devoted to basic issue areas. Attention will be 
equally divided between an overview of the state of 
our knowledge in a particular area and a considera- 
tion of the research designs and procedures most 
typically employed in the area. Evaluation will be 
based on two exams and a term paper. This course is 
required for all students planning a concentration in 
sociology. 



BES 320 SO 

Social Structure and Personality 

Prof. William Martin 

The focus on this course is on social structural 
determinants of interaction patterns and individual 
characteristics. Five themes will be presented in a 
lecture-discussion format: 1) the nature of the social 
structure; 2) socialization; 3) processes of social 
influence; 4) processes of group interaction; and 5) 
the reciprocal relation of the individual to the larger 
social system. Included in these themes are such 
topics as alienation, social control, attitude change, 
role conflict, collective behavior, and development 
of the social self. 

Prerequisite: an introductory course in either 
sociology or psychology. 



BES 322 SO 

Age and Generations 

Prof. William Martin 

This course concentrates on aging and age status as 
determinants of social interaction and social 
change. The first half of the course is concerned with 



BES 325 SO-TBA 

BES 328 SO 

Complex Organizations and Bureaucracies 

Prof, lack Williams 

This course will deal with the social and historical 
origins of complex organizations and bureaucracies; 
the contributions of the classical and contemporary 
theorists; methodological problems in the empirical 
study of organizations; and the behavior of organi- 
zations in their social and cultural environments. 
Students will be evaluated on the basis of two exams 
and a paper. In the paper, students will be asked to 
develop and/or review a theory on some aspect of 
organizational behavior and to outline procedures 
for the empirical investigation of the theory. 

Prerequisite is BES 180 or an introduction to 
sociology which emphasized scientific methods. 



BES 424 SO - TBA 

BES 426 SO 

History of Sociological Theory 

Prof. William Martin 

This course deals with the development of sociolo- 
gical theory in the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries, from Comte to Mannheim. Students will 
survey the historical period that gave rise to modern 
sociology, the lives and social milieux of selected 
classical theorists, and the development of their 
theoretical approaches to society. Evaluation will be 
through examinations and papers written in 
acceptable style and format. 

This course is designed for junior and senior students 
with considerable background in sociology. 

For other sociology courses see Creative Arts 
Collegium. 



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COLLEGIUM OF NATURAL SCIENCES 
COLLEGIUM COURSES 

NAS 184 [Modes of Learning] 
Computer Algorithms and Programming 

Prof. Robert Meacham 

The main purpose of this course is to help the 
student understand today's (and tomorrow's) world 
where information is the prime commodity. The 
processing of information in business, science, 
government, and industry is rapidly becoming one of 
the major endeavors of our civilization. Students in 
this course will learn not. only what computers can 
and cannot do but will learn to understand and 
appreciate the step-by-step methodical chain that 
begins with a problem, processes it through a 
computer, and ends with a satisfactory solution. 

NAS 191 [Directed Study] 
The Universe 

Prof. Irving Foster 

The sky and its contents have been a matter of 
tremendous interest and detailed study by man since 
the beginning of history. In the past, man's philo- 
sophical and religious outlook molded his view of 
the universe. Today, however, we pay more 
attention to matters of astronomy — physical organi- 
zation and structure - than to philosophy or 
religion. We get an overall view of the universe; then 
study the solar system in more detail; take a close 
look at stars and galaxies; and, finally, we sketch the 
history of cosmological ideas — the historical devel- 
opment of our changing views of the universe. 

NAS 192 [Directed Study] 
The World of Life 

Prof. Irving Foster 

This course stresses both the antiquity and the 
complexity of life on earth . We will begin with the 
question of how life came to be, and how it evolved 
into the myriad forms we find today. In the latter 
part of the course, we will study life, not in terms of 
individuals or isolated species, but life as lived in 
communities of many individuals and species — 
communities in most of which man is playing an 
ever-increasing role. Students must read four paper- 
back books, write six short papers, and either take an 
exam or write a major research paper. 

NAS 202 

Chemistry, Man and Society 

Prof, loan D'Agostino 

This course has been created to meet the needs of 
non-science majors who wish to learn more about 
the chemistry of the world we live in without going 



through mathematical treatments found in more 
traditional approaches to the subject. After an intro- 
duction to the elements, chemical bonding, and 
molecular shape, the course will focus on chemical 
aspects of such substances as water, fertilizers, 
polymers, detergents, and poisons. The chemistry of 
cooking, food additives, drugs, consumer products, 
paints, and photography will also be discussed. This 
course is intended to give the student a better 
knowledge and appreciation of the chemical 
workings which are so much a part of our everyday 
lives. 

NAS 204 
Electronics 

Prof. Wilbur Block 

Emphasis is on the familiarization of the beginning 
electronics student with the use of electronic instru- 
ments such as the oscilloscope, vacuum tube volt- 
meter, and variable frequency oscillator. Starting 
with first principles of circuit theory (Ohm's Law), 
the basic circuit elements such as power supplies, 
amplifiers, and oscillators are studied and 
constructed in the laboratory, utilizing the 
instruments listed above. The course's philosophy is 
to impart to the interested student sufficient 
knowledge of electronics to enable him to utilize 
modern electronic techniques and instrumentation. 

NAS 205 
Astronomy 1976 

Prof. Wilbur Block 

In this course we study the solar system and its 
origin, the stars and their evolution and the structure 
and origin of the universe of galaxies. We learn the 
principles of astronomical measurement and in the 
laboratory examine the instruments by which they 
are made. We identify the constellations and 
observe the moon, planets and stars telescopically 
where possible, using slides and films for those 
objects which can be seen only by the great tele- 
scopes. Finally, we consider man and his relation- 
ship to the universe from which he descended and to 
the life which must abound within it. 

NAS 206 

The Paradox of Color 

Prof. Irving Foster 

Much of the color that we see is more a product of 
our own physiological and psychological response 
than it is of the physical nature of things. The first 
part of the course is concerned with the physical 
basis of color, the electromagnetic wave, the physi- 
ological structures of the human body which are 
sensitive to them, and the psychological response of 
the brain which provides the perception and the 



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illusion we call color. We then study the additive 
and subtractive methods of color mixture and 
control and consider the schemes by which colors 
may be specified and measured. Finally we shall 
look at the use of color in design, photography, and 
painting. 

NAS 207 
Introduction to Geology 

Prof. George Reid 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with 
knowledge of the composition of the earth's crust, 
and the dynamics and processes that have led to 
present-day land forms. Topics such as mineralogy, 
crustal movements, volcanism, ground and surface 
waters, and glaciation will be considered, as well as 
the history of the earth and its inhabitants and 
surface features. Laboratory work will emphasize 
identification of rocks, minerals, and fossil types, 
together with interpretation of geologic and 
topographic maps. Field trips will be made to nearby 
localities of geologic interest. 



NAS 291 [Directed Study] 
A History of Scientific Ideas 

Prof. Irving Foster 

Science has been a vital force in Western society for 
at least three hundred years. As a contributor to 
man's cosmic outlook, and increasingly as the 
source of ideas which provide the basis of our tech- 
nological civilization, it has today attained ovei- 
whelming importance. But while gadgets may b& the 
symbols of science in the eyes of many, ideas are the 
really important things. Some of these ideas have 
been traditionally associated with astronomy, some 
with physics or with chemistry, and some with 
biology. Taken altogether they present a carefully 
structured edifice of knowledge on the basis of 
which we attempt to understand the natural world. 

NAS 292 [Directed Study] 
Readings in Science 

Prof. Irving Foster 

This is a widely inclusive course which can be 
oriented in any one of many ways in accordance 
with the special interests of the student. Bibliogra- 
phies and texts are available for such topics as 
"Science and Culture," "Science and Literature," 
"Science and Religion," "The Physical Nature of 
Time," and "Science and Science Fiction." 
The requirements of each of these courses are 
similar. Each demands the completion of a specified 
reading list and the writing of several papers 
including a major research paper. 



NAS 391 [Directed Study] 
Cosmology 

Prof. Irving Foster 

Cosmology is the study of the structure and 
characteristics of the astronomical universe. 
Originally the study of astronomy was purely 
concerned with positions and appearances, but after 
Newton proclaimed the unity of physical law 
throughout the universe, astronomy came to rely 
more and more upon the application of physical law 
to planetary or stellar or galactic processes. This 
course emphasizes the physical processes which 
account for the presence and the characteristics of 
solar system, galaxy, and universe. A background of 
at least an elementary course in physics and 
mathematics through calculus will be necessary. 

NAS 401 

The Oceans and Man 

Prof, lohn Ferguson 

This course is designed to provide a genera! 
understanding of the oceanic environment and its 
significance to man. This will be accomplished by 
discussing the intrinsic physical properties of the 
earth and its seas; by considering the seas as a 
habitat, including the natural coastal waters, the 
marine biological environment, fisheries, and the 
developing systems of marine farming; and by 
analyzing the meaning of the oceans to man - past, 
present, and future. This will include discussions of 
sea power and its effect on world history, sea law, 
salvage, and problems of ownership of the oceans 
and the sea floor. 

NAS 488 VS 

Natural Sciences Collegium - Colloquium [2-year 

sequence] 

Prof. Robert Meactiam and Staff 
This course is designed to be of interest to all juniors 
and seniors in the Natural Sciences Collegium. 
Topics relating to value questions from a scientific 
point of view are presented both by our own faculty 
and by invited speakers. Paperback books of topical 
interest will be selected to form a basis for the 
colloquium. Students are expected to keep a journal 
and to prepare a series of papers relating to the 
central issues raised in the colloquium. 

BIOLOGY 

NAS 112 Bl 

Organismic Biology II: Vertebrates 

Prof. George Reid 

This is a study of the structure and evolutionary 

development of the organs and anatomical systems 



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of the phylum Chordata. Morphology is considered 
in relation to classification, modes of life, and 
adaptations to the environment. There will be six 
hours of lecture-discussion and six hours of labora- 
tory per week. Materials to be used: Storer et a!.. 
General Zoology; Walker, Vertebrate Dissection. 
Work to be submitted for evaluation: quizzes and 
examination, laboratory dissections. 

NAS 180 Bl [Modes of Learning] 
Natural History 

Prof. Carol Jefferson 

This Modes-Of-Learning course is designed to 
introduce beginning students to methods of 
scientific inquiry, using a topic of widespread 
interest. The methods of inquiry stressed and their 
related skills are; 1) observation: data recording; 2) 
identification: use of systematic manuals and keys; 
3) quantification: elementary statistics; 4) 
hypothesis formulation and testing: design and 
execution of experiments; 5) abstraction and 
summarization: composition of a technical paper; 6) 
literature search: location and use of 
scientific literature. 

NAS 211 Bl 
Ecology 

Prof. George Reid 

This is an introduction to physical, chemical, and 
biological relationships in natural communities. 
Environmental factors, populations, the community 
concept, traffic in energy, biogeochemical cycles, 
and social organization in ecosystems are con- 
sidered. Field work is essentially aquatic in nearby 
ponds and Gulf shoreline. There will be six hours of 
lecture-discussion and twelve hours of laboratory. 
Work to be submitted for evaluation: quizzes and 
final examination, laboratory technique, laboratory 
report. 

NAS 212 Bl 
Cell Biology 

Prof. William Roess 

Cell structure and function will be examined 
systematically. The flow of energy will be a unifying 
principle linking the processes of photosynthesis, 
anaerobic respiration, aerobic respiration, and the 
expenditure of energy by the cell to do work. The 
chemical processes in living systems will be related 
to the structural subunits of cells. Prepared slides 
will be used to show cell diversity and how cells are 
organized into tissues. Major compounds found in 
cell systems will be examined in the laboratory. 
Prerequisites: high school level of chemistry and 
biology. 



NAS 213 Bl 
Botany 

Prof. Carol Jefferson 

In this course the biology of plants will be 
investigated. Topics will include the growth of 
plants, responses to environmental conditions, and 
evolutionary diversity of plants. Both vascular and 
non-vascular plants will be considered. Laboratories 
will be primarily field-oriented and will emphasize 
special plant adaptations and the identification of 
common species and their role in local ecosystems. 
Evaluation will be based on three examinations, 
laboratory quizzes, and participation in laboratory 
and discussion. 

NAS 214 Bl 
Microbiology 

Prof. Carol Jefferson 

This course is an introduction to the biology of 
micro-organisms. The diversity of one-celled and 
subcellular organisms will be considered in relation 
to evolutionary status and ecological functions. The 
structure of the bacterial cell, bacterial physiology, 
and microbial genetics will also be investigated. 
Viruses, PPLO's, bacteria, slime molds, and lower 
fungi, algae, and protozoans will be included, but 
the emphasis will be on the procaryots. Laboratory 
activities will stress microbiological laboratory 
techniques, isolation and identification of selected 
genera, and microbial ecology. 

NAS 311 Bl 

Comparative Physiology: Interpretive 

Prof. John Ferguson 

This course will examine in some detail the various 
physiological mechanisms possessed by different 
animals. General principles will be emphasized as 
revealed through application of the comparative 
method. Integration of these principles into other 
areas of the student's individual interest will be 
enhanced through interdisciplinary work, a term 
paper, or other type of appropriate activity. 

Prerequisites: designed for junior-level science 
students who are particularly interested in interdici- 
plinary work or for less professionally oriented 
biology majors. 

NAS 312 Bl 

Comparative Physiology: Investigative 

Prof. John Ferguson 

This course will examine in some detail the various 
physiological mechanisms possessed by different 
animals. General principles will be emphasized as 
revealed through application of the comparative 
method. Marine organisms will be chosen as 



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examples whenever possible and only minor 
comment will be made on the functional processes 
unique to man. An investigative laboratory, 
employing advanced methodology, will function to 
sharpen the student's analytical skills as applied to 
the whole organism. 

Prerequisites: designed for junior-level biology 
majors. 

NAS 313 Bl 

Genetics and Development: Interpretive 

Prof. William Roess 

Mendelian and transcription genetics will be pre- 
sented from an historical perspective. Key 
experiments will be described in sufficient detail to 
lead the student to a better understanding of how 
questions are asked and answered in the biological, 
sciences. Gene regulation will be used as a bridge to 
introduce processes in development. 
Prerequisites: designed for junior-level science 
students who are particularly interested in 
interdisciplinary work or for less professionally 
oriented biology majors. 

NAS 314 Bl 

Genetics and Development: Investigative 

Prof. William Roess 

Mendelian and transcription genetics will be 
presented from an historical perspective. Key 
experiments will be described in sufficient detail to 
lead the student to a better understanding of how 
questions are asked and answered in the biological 
sciences. Gene regulation will be used as a bridge 
introducing processes in development. This course 
will be a lecture course with laboratory work 
designed to develop specific skills, including how to 
grow, maintain and experiment with microbial and 
possibly mammalian tissue culture cells. 
Prerequisite: designed for junior-level biology 
majors. 

NAS 411 Bl 

Advanced Topics in Ecology 

Prof. George Reid 

This course will consider selected aspects of aquatic 
or terrestrial ecosystems. Topics to be incuded will 
be determined by student interests. 
Prerequisites: Organismic Biology I and Ecology. 

NAS 412 Bl 

Advanced Topics in Genetics 

Prof. William Roess 

This course will examine principles of human 
genetics, the genetics of chromosomal abnormali- 
ties, physiological defects, and behavioral disorders. 



We will hold discussions throughout the course 
regarding the biological and social implications of 
advances in human genetics, and the specific depth 
and breadth of our study will be largely determined 
by the interests and background of the students 
enrolled. 

Prerequisite: general genetics or permission of the 
instructor. 



NAS 413 Bl 

Advanced Topics in Botany 

Prof. Carol Jefferson 

Students will select a topic or research project of 

particular interest for the semester. Each student wil 

prepare a proposal and final paper and will meet, 

when necessary, with the professor to discuss 

individual progress on the topic. An hour-long 

presentation and examination period before the 

class will be expected. Evaluation: Participation in 

discussion, paper and presentation on individual 

topic or project. 

Prerequisite: NAS 213 Bl [Botany]. 



NAS 419 Bl 

Independent Research: Thesis 

Biology Staff 

Upon invitation, seniors may design and carry out a 
creative research program, usually resulting in a 
written dissertation which is presented and defended 
in the spring of the year. Each participant will 
consult closely throughout the course of his work 
with at least one of the biology faculty. Materials to 
be used are original literature. Work submitted for 
evaluation; preliminary prospectus, periodic 
progress reports, dissertation. 

Prerequisites: three years of superior work in biology 
and an invitation from the biology faculty. 



NAS 481 VS 

Biology Colloquium [2-year sequence] 

Prof. John Ferguson, Biology Staff 

This course will consist of a series of seminars and 
discussions on topical problems in biology, 
especially those not fully explored in other areas of 
the biology curriculum. Particular concern will be 
maintained for the historical heritage of the 
discipline. Each participant will make at least one 
presentation, and must attend and actively 
contribute to all meetings. Work to be submitted for 
evaluation: abstract and bibliography of 
presentation, evaluation reports on selected 
speakers, and a final exam on the assigned readings. 



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CHEMISTRY 

NAS 121 CH 
Concepts in Chemistry I 

Prof, loan D'Agostino 

This course treats the fundamental principles of 
modern chemical theory and is designed for those 
who plan to major in the sciences. Concepts of 
stoichiometry, periodicity, atomic structure, 
chemical bonding, and molecular geometry are 
presented in a framework which draws upon both 
inorganic and organic examples. The physical and 
chemical behavior of gases and liquids are also 
discussed. 

Prerequisites: a good high school chemistry course 
and three years of high school math or Introduction 
to Chemistry, NAS 182 CH. 

NAS 122 CH 
Concepts in Chemistry II 

Prof, loan D'Agostino 

This course continues to explore the fundamental 
principles of modern chemical theory which are of 
special importance to later work in chemistry and 
molecular biology. Topics to be included are 
thermodynamics, acid-base chemistry, chemical 
equilibrium, electrochemistry and kinetics. An 
introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry, 
including molecules of biochemical importance, wil 
also be presented. The laboratory program will 
complement the lecture material through the 
course. 

Prerequisites: successful completion of Concepts in 
Chemistry I. 

NAS 182 CH [ Modes of Learning] 
Introduction to Chemistry 

Prof. Philip Ferguson 

This course is designed to be an introduction to the 
study of science for those of limited background in 
chemistry and mathematics. Specific attention will 
be given to developing skills in keen observation, 
logical analysis, imaginative conception, and 
solving mathematical problems. By reading, films, 
lecture, and problem discussion, students will 
develop factual knowledge of chemistry in relation 
to contemporary problems, and the imaginative 
concepts of molecular structure and dynamics. 
Prerequisite: high school algebra. 

NAS 211 CH 
Organic Chemistry I 

Prof. Philip Ferguson 

Organic Chemistry is a two-course sequence, the 

first course concentrating on compounds of carbon 



and hydrogen. The study of hydrocarbon structure 
will be supported from the beginning directly with 
infrared spectroscopy and indirectly with the study 
of the mechanisms of the reactions of these 
fundamental materials. After gaining a knowledge of 
the properties of the hydrocarbon skeletal materials, 
the polar functional groups will be considered, 
especially in the second course. 
Prerequisites: Concepts in Chemistry I and II. 

NAS 222 CH 
Organic Chemistry II 

Prof. Philip Ferguson 

Organic Chemistry II continues the study of 
functional group chemistry and the effect of the 
groups on hydrocarbon skeleton chemistry. The 
study proceeds from simpler to more complex 
substituents and finally to compounds with 
multifunctional substitution. Where possible, 
compounds of specific biological and medical 
interest will be used as examples for illustration of 
basic principles. The fundamental chemistry of 
carbohydrates, the amino acids and polypeptides, 
heterocycles and nucleic acids so basic to 
understanding the chemistry of life processes will be 
considered at the end of the sequence. 
Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I. 

NAS 323 CH 
Thermodynamics and Kinetics 

Prof. Richard Neithamer 

This course will emphasize a molecular approach to 

thermodynamics. It involves kinetic molecular 

theory, Boltzman distribution, the three laws of 

thermodynamics, free energy, thermochemistry, and 

the thermodynamics of liquids, phase equilibrium, 

solutions and colligative properties. Kinetics deals 

with the rates of chemical reactions, and the factors 

affecting them. 

Prerequisites: Concepts in Chemistry I and II, 

Physics I and II, Calculus I and II. 

NAS .324 CH 
Chemical Equilibrium 

Prof. Richard Neithamer 

The fundamental theory of chemical equilibrium will 
be applied to many types of equilibria. Systems 
studied include acid-base, redox, homogeneous, 
heterogeneous, and phase equilibria. These systems 
will be treated theoretically in the lecture and 
practically in the laboratory. Text for the course will 
be Skoog and West, Analytical Chemistry. 
Evaluation will be based upon satisfactory 
performance in tests, a final, and the laboratory. 
Prerequisite: Thermodynamics and Kinetics [NAS 
323CH] and Calculus II [NAS 132 MA]. 



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NAS 422 CH 

Advanced Organic Chemistry 

Prof. Philip Ferguson 

The course will study, in depth, certain structural 
concepts and reactions which are considered to be 
illustrative of the modern theory of Organic 
Chemistry. The structural concepts will be surveyed 
first, followed by consideration of the inter- 
dependency of the structure and the reactions 
chosen. The professor initially will lead the 
discussions, but eacti student will be expected to 
lead part of the study in the seminar format. Finally 
each student will prepare a term paper on an 
appropriate subject. Work to be submitted for 
evaluation; participation in the Seminar and the 
term paper. 
Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry 11. 

NAS 423 CH 

Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

Chemistry Staff 

This course will allow the student to obtain an 
in-depth view of electrical and optical methods of 
analysis, including an understanding of the 
component parts that are included in a variety of 
instruments. The laboratory will consist of a series of 
problems in which instrumental methods will be 
used as tools. Evaluation will be two examinations 
and a laboratory notebook including a minimum of 
eight experiments. 

Prerequisites: Thermodynamics and Kinetics, 
Physics I and II; Electronics is recommended. 

NAS 425 CH 
Biochemistry 

Prof. Richard Neithamer 

This course will emphasize the various chemical 
processes which occur in the living cell. We will 
beg-in by an in-depth consideration of the various 
molecular components of cells, moving on to a 
study of important metabolic pathways (and their 
regulation) involving the generation of 
phosphate-bond energy, followed by biosynthetic 
pathways utilizing phosphate-bond energy, and 
completing the study with replication, transcription, 
and translation of genetic information. 
Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I and II. Cell 
Biology will be particularly useful, but not 
necessary. 

NAS 426 CH 
Symmetry and Structure 

Prof, loan D'Agostino 

This course will cover the theoretical (symmetry, 

molecular orbital theory) and spectroscopic 



(ultra-violet, infrared, nmr) techniques applicable to 
a structural study of condensed states of matter. 
Symmetry operation will be performed on organic 
molecules and inorganic complexes in order to 
deduce the nature of bonding in these compounds. 
These results will be applied to spectroscopic 
transitions in these molecules, allowing a better 
understanding of the origins of such absorbances. 
Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry II, 
Thermodynamics and Kinetics, Calculus. 

NAS 429 CH 

Independent Research - Thesis 

Chemistry Staff 

Senior chemistry majors who have demonstrated 
competence in the field may be invited to do 
independent research with a member of the 
chemistry staff during their senior year. The student 
will be responsible for submitting a proposal of the 
research planned, carrying out the work, writing a 
thesis reporting the findings of the research, and 
defending the thesis before a thesis committee. 

NAS 482 VS 

Chemistry Colloquium [2-year sequence] 

Prof. Richard Neithamer 
This course involves a series of seminars and 
discussions on modern topics in chemistry or related 
areas. Students are expected to present at least one 
formal talk each year. Faculty and invited speakers 
also participate as the schedule permits. Evaluation 
will be based on the quality of student presentations 
and participation in discussions. Junior and senior 
chemistry majors participate formally in colloquium 
for one course credit. 



MATHEMATICS 



NAS 131 MA 
Calculus I 

Mathematics Staff 

This is the first course in a two-course sequence 
which deals with the calculus of single-valued 
functions. Concepts studied are function, limits, 
continuity, differentiation, and the definite integral. 
Applications to the physical sciences along with 
possible uses in economics are used to motivate the 
underlying mathematics. Evaluation: daily 
assignments, hour tests, and a final examination. 
Prerequisites: good understanding of high school 
algebra and trigonometry. 



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NAS 132 MA 
Calculus 11 

Mathematics Staff 

This is a continuation of calculus of single-valued 

functions. Topics are the calculus of exponential, 

logarithmic, trigonometric, and inverse 

trigonometric functions, formal integration, 

applications, and infinite series. 

Prerequisite: Calculus I or its equivalent. 

NAS 187 MA [Modes of Learning] 
Algebra 

Prof. Robert Meactiam 

This is a course in basic algebra — a prerequisite for 
success in Calculus 1 . Study begins with the language 
of logic and sets, followed by the foundations of the 
real number system. The function concept is 
explored in general, and then localized to 
polynomial and algebraic functions in particular. 
Analytic geometry is employed to display 
polynomials and conic sections, as well as to make 
clear the function concept. Foremost among the 
skills to be acquired in this course is the ability to use 
the language of mathematics correctly and to know 
what is meant by proof insofar as problems and 
theorems of manipulative algebra are concerned. 

NAS 188 MA [Modes of Learning] 
Trigonometry 

Prof. George Lofquist 
Trigonometry is basic to the study of all 
mathematics, and is especially valuable to those 
students who wish to study calculus. The inclusion 
of material on the exponential and logarithmic 
functions will also have direct applicability to 
courses in chemistry and physics. Students will learn 
about the foundations of mathematics, methods of 
reasoning, and the structure of our number system. 
The primary emphasis will be on the understanding 
of concepts with the secondary emphasis on 
technical processes involved in trigonometric 
applications. 

NAS 189 MA [Modes of Learning] 
Finite Mathematics 

Prof. George Lofquist 

The study and understanding of mathematics or its 
applications on any level presuppose an ability to 
handle symbolic statements in a manner which is 
logically meaningful. The development of that major 
skill will be the predominant emphasis of the course. 
This course is designed to satisfy the needs of 
students who desire an introduction to the 
mathematics used in behavioral and social sciences, 
for those who need an acquaintance with probability 



for biology, and for those who need some 
background mathematics before studying statistics. 

NAS 191/2 MA [Directed Study] 
Calculus I, 11 

Pro^s. George Lofquist, Billy Maddox, Robert 
Meacliam 

This is a two-course sequence on the calculus of 
functions of one variable. Study will begm with 
functions and the introduction of the concept of 
limits and continuity, followed by the development 
of the derivative and the definite integral with 
applications of both. The study will conclude with a 
discussion of transcendental functions. Topics 
covered in Calculus II will include applications of 
the definite integral, techniques of integration, and 
infinite sequence and series. The student should not 
register for both Calculus I and Calculus II at the 
same time without prior consultation with the 
instructor. 

NAS 233 MA 
Calculus III 

Prof. Robert Meacfiam 

In this course the calculus of functions of several 

variables is developed. Topics included are three 

dimensional analytic geometry, partial derivatives, 

directional derivatives, extrema of functions of 

several variables, multiple integration, and 

applications. 

Prerequisite: Calculus II or its equivalent. 

NAS 234 MA 
Differential Equations 

Prof. Robert Meacham 

This is a course in ordinary differential equations. 

After seeing how differential equations arise 

naturally in the world around us, the student will 

study linear differential equations of second and 

higher order, series solutions, the Laplace transform, 

systems of first order equations, and numerical 

methods. 

Prerequisites: Calculus III or its equivalent. 

NAS 235 
Linear Algebra 

Prof. George Lofquist 
This is a study of vector spaces and linear 
transformations with application to systems of 
equations and matrices. Essential material will be 
developed in class with students encouraged to 
make discoveries on their own initiative. 
Prerequisites: mattiematical maturity developed by 
one who has completed two college calculus 
courses. Highly motivated students may enroll after 



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one calculus course with their calculus instructor's 
recommendation. 

NAS 332 MA 
Foundations in Geometry 

Prof. George Lofquist 

This study will center on the foundations of 
Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, capitalizing 
on an axiomatic approach. This course is designed to 
give the student the tools, insight, and motivation to 
approach elementary geometry from a new perspec- 
tive and with an open mind. Class time will be used 
to clarify concepts, answer questions, and for 
discussion. This course is particularly appropriate for 
prospective secondary-school mathematics teachers. 
Prerequisite: Calculus II. 

NAS 431 MA 
Applied Mathematics 

Prof. Robert Meacham 

Mathematics is appreciated not only as an art form 
in itself (!), but also as the language by which 
phenomena from physical, economic, sociological, 
biological, or psychological fields can often be 
quantified, simulated, or explained. This is done by 
constructing mathematical models of the other 
fields. In this course, a number of mathematical 
models from several fields are carefully developed 
and exploited. The relation between theoretical 
deductions from the models on one hand and 
physical reality on the other are explored. 
Prerequisite: Calculus III or permission of the 
instructor. 

NAS 433 MA 
Real Analysis I 

Prof. Billy Maddox 

This is the first course in a two-course sequence in 

which the foundations of real analysis are first 

explored and advanced topics in calculus are then 

developed. Topics include limits of sequences, the 

derivative, the Riemann-Stieltjes integral, infinite 

series of functions, Taylor's theorem, and Fourier 

Series. 

Prerequisite:Calculus III or its equivalent. 

NAS 434 MA 
Real Analysis II 

Prof. Billy Maddox 

This is a continuation of Real Analysis I, dealing 
primarily with functions of several variables. Topics 
include the total differential, the directional 
derivative, implicit function theorem, Lagrangion 
multipliers, and applications to curves and surfaces; 
improper integrals as functions of a parameter, 



transformations of multiple integrals, line integrals. 
Green's theorems, and Stoke's Theorem. 
Prerequisite: Real Analysis I. 

NAS 439 MA 
independent Research - Thesis 

Mathematics Staff 

Seniors majoring in mathematics may, upon 

invitation of the mathematics faculty, do research. A 

senior who does research will write a paper and 

make an oral presentation of the results of the 

research. 

NAS 483 VS 
Mathematics Colloquium 

Mathematics Staff 

Once every other week during modules I through IV, 
the mathematicians — students and faculty — meet 
to hear papers related to their individual interests. 
Visiting mathematicians or films are also on the 
program. One course credit is given to students who 
participate fully in the colloquium over the junior 
and senior years. 



PHYSICS 



NAS 141 PH 
Fundamental Physics I 

Prof. Irving Foster 

The aim of physics is to understand the nature of the 
physical world, particularly the particle and wave 
phenomena which arise from the inertial and 
electrical properties of matter. The three-course 
sequence. Fundamental Physics I, II, III, presents a 
contemporary view of the concepts, principles, and 
theories that express this understanding in a basic 
and elementary form. Course content is presented by 
means of descriptive and quantitative textbook 
material, in appropriate laboratory exercises, and in 
synthesizing lectures and discussions. 
Prerequisite: NAS 182, Pre-Calculus Skills or its 
equivalent. 

NAS 142 PH 
Fundamental Physics il 

Prof. Irving Foster 

The second course of the elementary physics 

sequence deals with the phenomena of electricity 

and magnetism and with elastic waves, 

electromagnetic waves, and optics. 

Prerequisite: NAS 141 PH or consent of the 

instructor. 



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NAS 243 PH 
Fundamental Physics III 
Thermodynamics and Relativity 

Prof. Wilbur Block 

This course is an optional continuation of 
Fundamental Physics I and II and treats thermo- 
dynamics, whose laws state informally that a) "You 
can't get something for nothing," and b) "You can't 
even break even." Included in the course is the study 
of special relativity which explores the similarities 
and differences of scientific observations of 
observers moving relative to one another at high 
velocities approaching the speed of light. 

NAS 345 PH 
Electronics for Scientists 

Prof. Wilbur Block 

This course is similar to NAS 204 Electronics, but 

treats the material with more mathematical rigor. 

Topics covered include those of NAS 204 with the 

addition of servomechanisms, operational 

amplifiers, and integrated circuits. 

Prerequisites: knowledge of calculus and elementary 

electrical ptienomena, or consent of tt)e professor. 

NAS 443 PH 
Quantum Physics I 

Staff, by arrangement 

This course will examine experimental results 
leading to the formulation of modern quantum 
physics. The Schroedinger wave equation will be 
studied primarily through the solution of physical 
problems treating a variety of one-dimensional 
potential functions, with special attention to the 
comparison of classical and quantum results. 
Materials to be used: text and audio-visuals. Work to" 
be submitted for evaluation: solutions to assigned 
problems and written examinations. 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

NAS 444 PH 
Quantum Physics II 

Staff , by arrangement 

This course is a continuation of Quantum Physics I . 
The three-dimensional wave equation is studied with 
particular application to hydrogenic atoms. 
Identical particles and scattering theory are 
introduced with emphasis on the scattering of 
low-energy ions by atoms and molecules. Materials 
to be used: text, audio-visuals, and scattering 
laboratory equipment. Work to be submitted for 
evaluation: solutions to assigned problems and 
written examinations. 

Prerequisites: Quantum Pfiysics I or consent of 
instructor. 



NAS 449 PH 

Independent Research - Thesis 

Pfiysics Staff 

Outstanding students majoring in physics normally 
are invited to engage in active research and to 
prepare a thesis in lieu of senior comprehensive 
examinations. Apparatus is available for research in 
low-energy ionic-atomic scattering, the primary 
current research interest of the physics staff. 
Additional equipment is available for studies in X-ray 
crystal-lography, high-vacuum techniques, and 
decameter wave-length radio astronomy. 
This course is designed primarily for thesis students, 
but is available to others by special permission of the 
staff. 

NAS 484 VS 

Physics Colloquium [2-year Sequence] 

Prof. Wilbur Block and Prof. Irving Foster 
Early in the semester the group will pick a topic to 
study through contact with experts in the field, 
library research, laboratory research, discussions, 
and presentation by group members. Typically, the 
subject of interest will focus on an active research 
program such as the current low-energy ion-atom 
scattering project. Evaluation is based on student 
interest and participation. Physics Colloquium is 
normally taken throughout the junior and senior 
years for one course credit. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

NAS 151 PS 

The Biological Bases of Human Behavior 

Prof. Sal Capobianco 

Our behavior is wondrously complex; yet, like all 
other biological processes, it is shaped and con- 
strained by the structure and physiology of our 
bodies. All that we see, hear, think, feel, and 
remember is to some degree a reflection of the 
organization of our central nervous system, and the 
continuous interplay of nervous and biochemical 
processes. The purpose of this course is to give the 
student an understanding of these processes. To do 
this, we will focus on the central nervous system and 
major sensory systems. 

NAS 251 PS 

Fundamentals of Psychological Research 

Prof. Salvatore Capobianco 

This course will attempt to introduce the student to 
the nature of research and experimentation in 
psychology. Starting with the basic understanding of 
research methodology, the topics of formulation of 



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hypotheses, design of experiments, execution of 
experiments, analysis of data, and communication 
of results to co-workers in the field will be included. 
All phases of experimentation will be covered, 
including observational techniques and correlational 
and laboratory methods. 

Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychology. A course 
in statistics is recommended. 

NAS 354 PS 

Advanced Topics in Biopsychology 

Profs. Salvatore Capobianco and lames MacDougall 
This course will acquaint students with contempo- 
rary research and theory in selected areas within 
biopsychology, and develop basic cognitive, 
analytic, and investigative skills. The course will 
couple intensive reading of text and journal sources 
with correlated laboratory and field-observational 
research. Topics include; a) neurophysiology and 
functional organization of the nervous system; b) 
neuroanatomy; c) limbic and diencephalic 
mechanisms of behavior; d) cortical mechanisms; 
and e) ethology. 

Prerequisite: Biology of Human Behavior or 
permission of the instructors. 

NAS 355 PS 
Learning 

Prof, lames MacDougall 

This course is a survey of contemporary theory and 
research directed toward an understanding of the 
mechanisms of human and animal learning. The 
major focus of the course will be upon complex 
learning processes in man, but some attention will 
be given to examining the more primitive types of 
learning manifest in lower organisms. Course topics 
include (a) the evolution of learning mechanisms 
(one week), (b) early psychology theories of learning 
(two weeks), (c) operant conditioning principles and 
their application to the control of human behavior 
(three weeks), (d) cognition and verbal learning in 
man (eight weeks). 
Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology. 

NAS 451 PS 
History and Systems 

Prof, lames MacDougall 

This is an advanced course intended primarily for 
junior and senior psychology majors. Its purpose is 
to develop a historical and conceptual framework 
within which one may understand the evolution and 
structure of modern psychology. The major portion 
of our efforts will be devoted to tracing the develop- 
ment of the primary systems of thought within 
psychology rather than formulating a chronological 



description of men and events. Performance will be 
evaluated on seminar discussions, a required 
research paper, and a comprehensive final 
examination. 

NAS 459 PS 

Independent Research - Thesis 

Prof, lames MacDougall 

Students majoring in biopsychology or related areas 
may elect to devise an independent study project 
with one of the participating faculty members. Such 
projects may be oriented toward library research and 
reading, or may involve laboratory or field research 
projects. Directed research leading to a senior thesis 
is normally available only by invitation of the 
participating faculty member. Students planning to 
do a senior thesis must complete a preliminary 
research proposal by April of their junior year. 

NAS 485 VS 

Biopsychology Colloquium [2-year sequence] 

Prof, lames MacDougall 

The Biopsychology Colloquium provides a forum for 
the presentation and discussion of original research 
of interest to the biopsychology major. A general 
rubric is selected each semester by the participating 
faculty members and students, and each student 
selects a research topic within the area to present to 
the colloquium as a whole. Evaluation will be based 
on the quality of student presentations and partici- 
pation in paper discussions. 
Prerequisites: presentations open to ail, major in 
biopsychology required for credit. Normally taken 
during junior and senior years for one course credit. 
For other psychology courses see Creative Arts and 
Behavioral Science Collegia. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

[The following activities do not 
carry course credit.] 

Red Cross Basic Canoeing and Canoeing 
Instructor 

Bill Covert and Richard Rhodes II 
This 30-hour course consists of 15 hours of the Basic 
course and 15 hours of the Instructor's course. The 
Basic Canoeing part provides a study of types and 
uses of canoes, nomenclature, repair, and paddles; 
lifting, carrying, launching, docking, boarding and 
debarking, trimming, and exchanging positions; 
vaulting out of and entering from deepwater, rescue 
and self-rescue using canoes; solo and tandem pad- 
dling with and without wind, formation paddling. 




canoe games. The Canoeing Instructor part consists 
of a study of the methodology and techniques for 
teaching canoeing, and the practical work of 
composing lesson plans and doing practice teaching. 
Successful students earn certificates from the Red 
Cross. 

Prerequisite: a swimming test. 

Beginning Sailing 

Bill Covert 

This is a study of sailing position, safety, standing 
and running rigging, hulls, and docking. Students 
will learn the terminology of sailing, sail setting, 
trim, weather and lee helm, coming about, jibing 
and tacking downwind, sails and sail care, capsizing, 
boat handling, hiking, basic aero-dynamics and 
fluid-dynamics, types of boats, types of rigs, 
equipment, rules of the road, basic racing, lighting 
requirements, charts, logging out, anchoring, and 
basic marlinspike seamanship. Successful students 
earn a certificate from the American Red Cross. 
Prerequisite: a swimming test. 



Advanced Sailing 

Bill Covert 

Study will include safety; capsizing; man overboard 
and first aid for the mariner; marlinspike seamanship 
skills such as knots, splicing, whipping, rope, and 
rope care. Other topics will include sails and sail 
repair, weather, cloud formations, storm and fog 
signals, aero- and fluid-dynamics, sailboat charac- 
teristics, rigging, lighting requirements, navigational 
aids, charts (mercator and gnomonic projection), 
government publications, variation, deviation, 
plotting (including the use of course protractor and 
dividers), labeling, line of position, fixes, cross 
bearing, bow and beam, seven-tenths rule, and dead 
reckoning. 

Prerequisites: a swimming test, Beginning Sailing or 
equivalent. 



Advanced Sailing II 

Bill Covert 

This course is designed for the student who wishes to 

pursue a knowledge of cruising, boat maintenance, 

tides, currents, marine electronics, and celestial 

navigation. There will be guest lecturers and trips to 

boat manufacturers and marine suppliers. Evaluation 

will be based on class work, a three-day cruise, and 

final written and skill exam. 

Prerequisites are a swimming test and Advanced 

Sailing I or equivalent. 



Scuba 

Bill Covert 

This course is designed for students who wish to 
learn the fundamentals of scuba diving. Classes will 
be held in the classroom, at the pool, and on field 
trips. Cost per student is $49 with YMCA certification 
provided upon successful completion. Required 
reading for this course will be the textbook. Diving 
For Fun. Evaluation will be based on class work, a 
final skill exam, and a final written exam. 
Prerequisites are a swimming test and a medical 
form signed by a doctor. 

Beginning Water Skiing 

Bill Covert 

This course is designed for students who wish to 
learn basic skiing, and includes signals, wake cross- 
ing, double skiing, safety precautions, and the 
qualities of a good observer. Work to be submitted 
for evaluation is class work, a final skill exam, and a 
final written exam. 

A swimming test is tiie only prerequisite. The cost for 
th/s course is $30.30. 

Intermediate Water Skiing 

Bill Covert 

This course is designed for students who wish to con- 
tinue water skiing beyond the begirining level. Some 
of the skills taught in this course will be funda- 
mentals of slalom skiing, saucer skiing, and trick 
skiing. Criteria for evaluation will be class work, a 
final skill exam, and a final written exam. 
Prerequisite is Beginning Skiing or the equivalent. 
The cost for this course is $30.30. 

Red Cross Advanced First Aid and Emergency Care 

Richard Rhodes II 

This 40-hour course consists of the philosophy 
behind first aid; wounds, specific injuries and shock; 
respiratory emergencies, drowning, and resuscita- 
tion; poisoning, drugs, and drug abuse; burns and 
exposure to radiation, heat, and cold; bone and joint 
injuries, immobilization, and splinting; dressings 
and bandages; sudden illness and emergency child- 
birth; extrication and emergency rescue and trans- 
fer. Successful students earn a certificate from the 
Red Cross. Evaluation is based on performance in 
bandaging, splinting, and other exercises; weekly 
quizzes; and a written and practical final 
examination. 

Red Cross Multimedia Standard First Aid 

Richard Rhodes II 

This course consists of the most important parts of 

the Red Cross Standard First Aid and Personal Safety 



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course, condensed into one 8-hour day, usually a 
Saturday, and is taught by three media: movies; 
programmed learning exercises in workbooks; and 
the practical work of bandaging, splinting, and 
transfer. This course is open to any member of the 
college community for a small fee to cover the cost 
of the textbook and materials. Successful students 
earn a certificate from the Red Cross. 

Red Cross Advanced Lifesaving 

Richard Rhodes II 

This 27-hour water safety course consists mainly of 
practical work - but also some reading and lectures 
- in personal safety and self-rescue; swimming 
rescues, defenses, releases, and escapes; search and 
rescue; special rescue and removal techniques; first 
aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation; beach and" 
surf rescue and lifeguarding; and small craft safety. 
Successful students earn an Advanced Lifesaving 
certificate from the Red Cross, which is the only cer- 
tificate required for some lifeguarding jobs, and a 
skill-level certificate in Cardiopulmonary Resuscita- 
tion. 

Prerequisites: good swimmirig endurance [500 yards] 
and marked ability in swimming strokes and related 
skills. 

Red Cross Water Safety Instructor 

Richard Rhodes II 

This 42-hour course consists of the methodology of 
teaching swimming and water safety and lifesaving, 
including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and the 
practical work of composing lesson plans and doing 
practice teaching. Successful students earn an 
instructor authorization from the Red Cross that 
permits the holder to teach any of a number of Red 
Cross swimming and water safety courses including 
Advanced Lifesaving. Students may also be certified 
as instructors of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 
Prerequisites: a current Advanced Lifesaving certi- 
ficate and a Red Cross Swimmer certificate [or the 
successful completion of an equivalency test]. 

Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Retraining 

Richard Rhodes II 

This is an interim 21-hour course designed to update 
the skills and certification of persons who hold a 
current W.S.I, certificate. Subject matter consists of 
the new Water Safety course structure, new material 
in the Advanced Lifesaving course, the material in 
the new courses in basic water safety and basic 
rescue, instructor-level cardiopulmonary resuscita- 
tion, and a review of swimming strokes on the level 
of Swimmer and Advanced Swimmer. Successful 



students earn a Red Cross certificate which 
authorizes the holder to teach the same courses the 
holder of a new W.S.I, course certificate can teach. 
Prerequisite: a current W.S.I, certificate. 

Red Cross Beginner Swimming 

Richard Rhodes II 

This 12-hour course consists of some reading and 
much practical work on basic swimming strokes and 
swimming skills. Successful students earn a certifi- 
cate from the Red Cross. Students who make suffi- 
cient progress may go on and take the Red Cross 
Advanced Beginner course in the same module, 
earning a second certificate. Reading material to be 
used is Swimming and Water Safety, Red Cross. 
Evaluation will be on the performance of swimming 
strokes and swimming skills. 
The prerequisite is a desire to learn to swim. 

Red Cross Intermediate and Swimmer Course 

Richard Rhodes II 

This 12-hour course is for students who already have 
a fair to good proficiency in swimming but who want 
to increase their endurance and versatility and 
perfect the additional strokes and skills that will 
make them all-round swimmers. Successful students 
earn two certificates from the Red Cross. The Inter- 
mediate Swimming certificate indicates the approxi- 
mate level of attainment needed for Advanced Life- 
saving, and its possession fulfills the swimming 
stroke and skill requirements for admission. 
Presentation of a Swimmer certificate [or the passing 
of an equivalency test] is one of the prerequisites for 
Water Safety Instructor. Prerequisite is a swimming 
ability equivalent to having passed the Red Cross 
Beginner or Advanced Beginner course. 

Beginning Tennis 

Profs, lames Harley and William Livesey 
This course is designed to give the student an 
introduction to the game of tennis and to help him 
develop the basic skills of the game. The text. Tennis 
by Johnson and Xanthas, will be used. Evaluation 
will be based on written, skills, and form 
examinations. 

Advanced Tennis 

Profs, lames Harley and William.Livesey 

This course is designed for students who wish to 

continue studying tennis beyond the beginning 

level. Evaluation will be based on written, skills, and 

form examinations. 

Prerequisite is Beginning Tennis or the equivalent. 



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WINTER TERM PROJECTS ON CAMPUS 



An "A" after the number in a winter term project 
indicates that the project is an alternate to an off- 
campus winter term project, and will be offered only 
if the off-campus winter term project is cancelled. 



FOUNDATIONS COLLEGIUM 

FND 21 
Study Skills 

Staff 

This project is designed to develop general learning 
skills through study and practice of reading, writing, 
listening, vocabulary-expanding, researching, and 
self-motivating. Evaluation will be by weekly in-class 
essays, vocabulary quizzes, discussion participation, 
a brief research paper, and regular individual confer- 
ences. Students select their own reading materials 
for reading and study technique practice. 
There are no prerequisites, but the project is limited 
to 20. Open to upperclassmen as well as freshmen. 

COLLEGIUM OF CREATIVE ARTS 

CRA 1 

Theatre Production 

Prof, lames Carlson 

Students will engage in various aspects of theatre 
production. Specific assignments will grow out of 
the productions undertaken, and it is expected that 
three or more short works will be presented. In 
addition to rehearsals and production assignments, 
students will be expected to attend regular critique 
sessions and to participate in technical exercises as 
scheduled. Because of the group nature of the 
projects involved, students will be expected to be on 
campus and on call throughout the period of the 
winter term. 
Permission required. 

CRA 2 

Furniture Design and Construction 

Prof. John Eckert 

This is a project of concentrated work on one or 
perhaps two projects over the month's time. Most of 
each student's time will be spent in the designing, 
accumulation of materials, and construction of the 
chosen project. Occasional group sharing sessions 
will be held to share ideas and help. Design of the 
piece of furniture is as important a component as the 
construction, and students should plan to spend 



adequate time in the design phase either before or 
during the term. 

It is asked that students have some experience either 
in the areas of design and drawing or wood working, 
so that they might have some base experience to 
bring to the month's work. 

CRA 3 

The Academic Novel 

Prof. Peter Meinke 

There have been so rnany novels set in the scholarly 
community that they almost constitute a genre in 
themselves. In this course we will read a selection of 
these, considering them as: 1) separate works of art, 
and 2) a collective analysis/criticism of academia by 
our novelists. Students will be required to read seven 
to ten novels, and keep a journal of their readings. 
There will be class discussions of each novel. 
Students also will be encouraged to write a short 
story with an academic setting. 

CRA 4 

Project in Elementary Education Methods 

Prof. Molly Ransbury 

This project is a continuation of Elementary Educa- 
tion Methods I, and is designed to offer the student 
the opportunity to delve more deeply into method- 
ological theory, to observe application of that theory 
in actual practice, and to incorporate theory and 
practice into a personal concept of teaching 
behavior. Observation and participation in the 
elementary school is supplemented by seminars and 
individual conferences. Evaluation is based on a 
comprehensive observation journal as well as devel- 
opment of creative manipulatives which enhance 
instructional methodology. 

CRA 5 

Pre-Renaissance and Renaissance Drawing and 

Painting Techniques 

Prof. Margaret Rigg 

This project is designed for art majors who are 
seriously concentrating upon individual develop- 
ment of their abilities in the techniques related to 
drawing and painting. This is an advanced research 
and techniques project for the purpose of exploring 
Medieval and Renaissance drawing and painting 
methods and appropriating skills in these techniques 
which will allow serious students a range of tech- 
nical possibilities from the past which can be used in 
their own contemporary style and expression. 
Prerequisites: Drawing Fundamentals, Intermediate 
Drawing, one painting course, or permission of the 
instructor. Limted to 76 students. 



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CRA 6 

Workshop: Achievement Motivation 

Proi. Alma Seniors 

The workshop will be designed to assist the student 
in exploring past individual and group successes 
through a variety of experiences and in developing 
guides to creative life management. The main thrust 
of the workshop will include discussions and 
experiences in: 1) What am I best suited for?; 2) 
strength indentification; 3) value identification; 4) 
success identification; and 5) conflict management. 
Students will be expected to engage in activities with 
an aim toward describing, studying, and evaluating 
oneself, and in helping others do the same. In so 
doing, they will examine definitions of abilities, 
interests, values, and goals. Evaluation will be based 
on workshop attendance, participation, and a 
written statement. 



CRA 7A 

Renaissance and Baroque Consort Music 

Prof. William Waters 

A study will be made of the recorder (early flute) and 
the crumhorn (early reed instrument). Each student 
will learn to play one of these instruments and will 
be assigned to a consort of players of his own 
reading-ability level. A study of the melody, 
rhythms, and forms of the music composed for these 
instruments will be made. Because the school has a 
limited number of instruments available for use, one 
conference with the instructor must be arranged 
before Christmas vacation in order to determine the 
number of instruments and music needed. Evalua- 
tion will be based on satisfactory performances of 
assigned literature and a research paper. 



CRA 8 
Philosophy of Sport 

Prof, jerry Gill 

An exploration of the epistemological, aesthetic, 
and moral dimensions of sports on both the individ- 
ual and cultural levels. The nature of body know- 
ledge, the possibility of seeing sports as an art form, 
the merits and demerits of competition, and the role 
of sport in society are the type of questions which 
will be examined. Croup discussions, group reports, 
and individual paper/projects will comprise the 
format of the course. Toward a Philosophy of Sport 
by Vanderswaag, the October 1974 issue of Phi Delta 
Kappan, and various other articles and books by and 
about athletes and their views will serve as texts. 



COLLEGIUM OF LETTERS 

LTR 1 

Aztec Life and History 

Prof. Burr Brundage 

This is a thorough examination of Aztec life — 
history, culture, religion, warfare, language, art, etc. 
The text for the project will be Brundage, A Rain of 
Darts, and the student will be responsible for the 
basic knowledge contained therein. The student will 
turn in a paper of approximately twenty pages on a 
subject of his own choosing. There will be lectures in 
the first week of the course and at intervals there- 
after, but the student's time will be mainly taken up 
with his reading and paper preparation. 

LTR 2A 

The Dead Sea Scrolls and Non-Canonical Early 

Christian Writings 

Prof. I. Stanley Chesnut 

Here is an opportunity for students to investigate the 
exciting Near Eastern world of the time of Jesus 
through some of its more exotic literature. Among 
the Dead Sea Scrolls are documents that may reveal 
previously unknown aspects of early Christianity, 
and there are hordes of other fascinating apocryphal 
and pseudepigraphical works from the same period. . 
We shall read, analyze and discuss as many of these 
writings as time permits. 
Alttiougti ttiere is no formal prerequisite, only 
students who are already thioroughly acquainted 
with the New Testament should attempt this project. 

LTR 3 

Contemporary Women Writers in France 

Prof. Rejane Genz 

One of the most striking aspects of French literature 
today is that it is very nearly dominated by women 
writers. The first two days of winter term will be 
devoted to getting acquainted with these writers. 
The individual student will then decide to read one 
work by each of several authors, or to concentrate 
on just one writer. The project will be offered in 
French and in English. There are no prerequisites for 
those taking it in English. 

For the student wishing to read the works in French, 
a third year level of proficiency in the language is 
desirable. 

LTR 4 

The South in American History 

Prof. William McKee 

In this project students will examine some aspects of 
Southern history during the last hundred years in an 
attempt to define the place of the South in American 



dh 



history. Specific research topics might include the 
heritage of Reconstruction, the "New South" move- 
ment, Southern Populism, the Progressive Move- 
ment in the South, Black history in the South, the 
history of segregation, and the New Deal in the 
South. Students will be expected to write a research 
paper which will relate their topic to the general 
program. 

LTR 5 

Finding The Hidden Philosophy in Literary 

Criticism 

Prof. Keith Irwin 

By a comparative study of the writing of some con- 
temporary literary critics, this project will assess 
critics' inevitable assumptions and biases. The 
winter term group will do jointly a sample analysis of 
one or two critics such as George Steiner, Leslie 
Fiedler, Susan Sontag, Nathan Scott, Ralph 
Kermode, or Northrop Frye. Students will then go to 
work on the analysis of one or two critics of their 
choice. The last week of the term will be a sharing of 
these analyses with an eye to discovering what we 
learn from them about criticism and its philo- ' 

sophical assumptions. 

LTR 6 

Research in American National Government and 

Politics 

Prof. Felix Rackow 

The objective of this winter term project is the 
development of an understanding of some aspect of 
the national government and politics in the United 
States. With the approval of the instructor, students 
may pick any topic oi interest to them within the 
general areas of the Constitution, political parties, 
pressure groups. Congress, the presidency, the ju- 
diciary, or civil liberties. The production of a 
scholarly paper will be the goal of the student's 
research. 

COLLEGIUM OF 
COMPARATIVE CULTURES 

ecu 1A 

The Three Great Pablos: Casals, Neruda, Picasso 

Prof. Frank Figueroa 

This project deals with the life and artistic produc- 
tion of these three great figures contributed to the 
world by the Spanish-speaking countries. Each 
student will concentrate on one of the three artists 
for in-depth research and study. All students are 
expected to attend all presentations in order to 
become acquainted with the three areas being 
studied, i.e., music, literature, and art. The group 



will meet twice a week for discussion, viewing of 
slides, movies, and musical presentations. Students 
will be expected to write a term paper of not less 
than fifteen pages. 



ecu 2 

Reading French: A Direct Approach 

Prof. Henry Cenz 

This project is designed for the student with little or 
no previous study of French who would like to 
acquire a basic reading knowledge in a short period 
of time. There will be study of vocabulary, idioms, 
grammar, and extensive practice in translating from 
French to English. Each student will undertake a 
reading project of his choice. Translation from 
French to English of research articles in the student's 
major field is especially encouraged. 
This project is open only to students who have had 
no more than one year of college French. 



ecu 3 

An Intensive Project in Reading German 

Staff 

This is an intensive project in reading German. 
Fundamentals of grammar and basic vocabulary will 
be taught the first week. The remainder of the term 
will assume the form of a workshop in which each 
student will work with materials in German from his 
own field of study. The goal of the workshop is to 
prepare each student with enough knowledge of the 
German language to permit independent continuing 
study in preparation for either graduate study or 
individual research. 



ecu 4 

The Anthropology of Conflict: The Cross- 
cultural Study of Law and Warfare 

Prof. Dudley DeCroot ■ 

This project will examine conflict as a social process 
in human culture through the examination of cross- 
cultural data. Questions to be examined will 
include: 1) universalistic grounds for conflict pro- 
duction in human culture; 2) various ways in which 
conflict is evaluated and handled in different 
cultures; 3) institutions and means of conflict 
resolution which have developed in different 
cultures; 4) the social usefulness of conflict. Conflict 
situations in contemporary United States will be 
examined in light of anthropological and 
sociological insights into the nature of human 
conflict. 



(n) 



COLLEGIUM OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE 



BES 1 

Topics in Anthropological Linguistics 

Prof, loan Barnett 

This project deals with linguistics as more than just 
the study of language. In a very real sense linguistics 
is an innovative science — the study of which gives 
us greater insight into the dynamic side of man's 
development through time. Linguistics as a disci- 
pline has moved significantly from initial studies of 
the phonetic alphabet and of grammatical structure 
to studies focusing on population movements, 
universal patterns within the sphere of language and 
culture, and studies of language and mental 
processes. Students will be assigned topics directly 
relating to ethnoiinguistics, psycholinguistics, 
sociolinguistics, and other topics of current interest 
in linguistics. 



BES 2 

Subcultures and Deviance 

Prof. Ted Dembroski 

Readings and discussions in this project will focus on 
"abnormal" people, ideas, life-styles, occupations, 
acts, and especially subcultures that the world, for a 
variety of reasons, may formally or informally stig- 
matize. The topic will be approached in three ways: 
1) examination of theories and hypotheses con- 
cerning subcultures and deviance, 2) discussions of 
essays based on interviews and/or naturalistic 
observation, 3) analysis of scientific experi- 
mental studies in social psychology. 



BES 3 

Interpersonal Processes 

Prof. Wesley Harper 

A great deal of the excitement, "unhappiness, and 
happiness in our lives comes from interacting with 
other people. What are some useful ways of studying 
interpersonal processes? This project will investigate 
human interaction in terms of disclosure, communi- 
cation, conflict, game playing, image presentation, 
and reinforcement analysis. In this project, students 
should obtain a basic understanding of these 
approaches to human interaction and the knowledge 
they have produced. In addition, there will be 
opportunities for individuals to focus their attention 
on such topics as group interaction, interpersonal 
attraction, authority relationships, nonverbal 
communication, etc. 



BES 4 

The Sociology of Popular Music 

Prof. William Martin 

This project pursues the sociological issues in how 
popular music reflects prevailing values, problems, 
self-identities, and coping patterns, and how music 
contributes to social change. Four types of music 
will be surveyed; folk, blues, country-western, and 
rock. Four areas of special investigation in the 
popular music scene to be discussed are the fan, the 
star, the lyrical content, and the industry. As 
opportunities present themselves, students will 
engage in the popular music process as sociological 
participant-observers. Evaluation will be on a term 
paper, an exam, and class participation. 

BES 5 

The Stock Market 

Prof. Tom Oberhofer 

The purpose of this winter term project is to help 
students develop a basic understanding of the stock 
market. Using the National Association of Invest- 
ment Clubs methodology, students will learn how to 
evaluate individual stocks, compare stocks within 
industries, and study criteria for developing a 
balanced stock portfolio. Emphasis is on stock 
selection for intermediate and long-term apprecia- 
tion rather than for short term speculation. 
Evaluation will be based on work done in and out of 
class and on a test. 

BES 6 

Creative Problem-Solving in Management 

Prof. Sandra Wilson 

The intent of this project is to introduce individuals 
interested in management to the need for creative 
managers who can help develop innovative organi- 
zations. The main thrust involves looking at new 
ways in which an organization can function. The 
approach here will be to take a look at "structured 
approaches to creativity. Some of the methods 
examined will be synectics, brainstorming, morpho- 
logical analysis, bionics, and attribute listing. These 
methods will be considered along with more 
traditional problem-solving methods (e.g., the 
scientific method). 

COLLEGIUM OF NATURAL SCIENCES 

NAS 1 

Natural Vegetation of Pinellas County: A 

Reconstruction 

Prof. Carol Jefferson 

In this winter term project, we will determine the 
natural vegetation of Pinellas County, Florida. 
Natural vegetation patterns will be reconstructed 



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through literature search, study of aerial 
photographs, site visits, and soil analysis. The class 
will prepare a comprehensive map and description 
of the natural vegetation and draw up recommenda- 
tions for potential nature preserve areas. 
Prerequisite: botar)y, ecology, or natural history 
would he helpful. 

NAS 2 

Biochemical and Genetic Characterization of 

Amino Acid Transport Systems 

Prof. William Roess 

Students will investigate the characteristics of amino 
acid transport systems in microbial cells and com- 
pare these findings with similar studies in human 
cells in culture. Normal and mutant strains will be 
investigated using radioactive amino acids as a 
means of measuring rates of transport and 
determining factors which regulate the transport 
process. A final written and/or seminar report will be 
submitted for evaluation. 

Prerequisite: at least one semester of college level 
biology or chemistry. 

NAS 3 

Tolerance of Aquatic Organisms to Environmental 

Factors 

Prof. George Reid 

One of the most pervasive principles in ecology is 
the "Law of Limiting Factors." It implies that the 
composition of ecological communites is 
determined by the limits of tolerance of the inhabit- 
ants to one or more physio-chemical and biological 
characters of the environment. This project is 
designed to permit experimentation on the reaction 
of selected animals to extremes in environmental 
factors such as temperature, salinity, pH, 
detergents, pesticides, and others. A report will be 
prepared in scientific style, and a seminar will be 
held in which students tell of their work. 
Limited to twelve students. 

NAS 4A 

Molecular Structure and Physiological Activity 

Prof. Philip Ferguson 

This project will investigate the structures of 
materials which are of value as medicinals. The 
student will study the relationships between 
molecular structure and physiological properties of 
medicinal materials, will investigate the general 
theories of chemotherapeutic activity, and will 
consider extensively one specific class of chemo- 
therapeutic agent. 

Prerequisite: Chemical Concepts II [Chemistry 122]. 
The level of sophistication expected will depend 
upon the student's background. 



NAS 5 

Coordination Chemistry 

Prof. Richard Neithamer 

When transition metal ions are bonded to inorganic 
or organic ions or molecules, the resulting com- 
pounds or species in solution are known as coordin- 
ation compounds or complex ions, respectively. In 
this project, we will deal with the chemistry of these 
coordinated species, including exposure to such 
concepts as symmetry, liquid field theory, and 
molecular orbital theory. Students will learn how to 
apply such analytical and physical tools as 
ultraviolet, visable, and infrared spectra; chemical 
kinetics; equilibrium, and thermodynamics to 
provide meaningful information concerning 
structure and properties of a variety of species. 

NAS 6 

Synthesis and Spectroscopy of Substituted 

Stilbenes 

Prof. Joan D'Agostino 

This project is a continuation of spectroscopic and 
photochemical research being carried out in the 
chemistry department and offers the student 
experience in the methodology of basic chemical 
research. We try to learn more about the photo- 
chemistry of a class of organic compounds by 
synthesizing them, studying their spectra, and con- 
ducting photochemical experiments with them. 
Evaluation will be based on the quality of laboratory 
work, the presentation of a paper summarizing 
laboratory findings, and participation in weekly 
seminars. 
Prerequisite: at least one year of college chemistry. 

NAS 7 
Computer Project 

Mathematics Staff 

This is an open-ended project suitable for students at 
any level of knowledge about computers. Beginners 
will learn to program in the language BASIC, and the 
more ambitious will also learn FORTRAN. Each 
student will work many small problems in learning 
the languages and one major problem or project. 
This project will be useful to any student whose 
course of study calls for data analysis or a significant 
amount of computation. Work will be done on 
Eckerd's time-sharing computer facility. 

NAS 8 

The Practical Art of Problem Solving 

Prof. George Lofquist 

This project is offered for the benefit of anyone who 
has not yet become proficient in the art of problem 
solving, and who needs such a skill. It should be 



(^ 



particularly appropriate for students who expect to 
take any course in which quantification or geometric 
problems will arise and for those who expect to be 
teaching such courses sometime in the future. A 
variety of approaches to problem solving will be 
presented for imitation and practice. These will 
include pattern recognition, case histories of 
solutions, contradiction, working backwards, 
induction, and generalizing, together with judicious 
guessing. 
Prerequisites: high school algebra and geometry. 

NAS 9 
Complex Variables 

Prof. Robert Meacham 

Complex variables are useful in studying two- 
dimensional problems in fluid flows, torsion of 
elastic bars, or electromagnetic field theory. Using 
Churchill's introduction to Complex Variables, the 
student will explore the exciting relation between 
real and complex variables, and obtain 
mathematical background leading to one of the 
above applications. 
Prerequisite: Calculus III. 



OFF-CAMPUS WINTER TERM PROJECTS 

CRA 8 

The Arts in Holland and Austria 

Prof. William Waters 

The project provides experience in the cultural life of 
two of Europe's centers of art and music, Amsterdam 
and Vienna. In Holland the students have access to 
the old and new music presented in the Concert- 
gebouw, to the memorable art collections of the 
Rijksmuseum. In Austria they will hear presentations 
of the Vienna State Opera and the Vienna Choir 
Boys. A brief stop is scheduled in Paris. Advance 
readings are The Kingdom of the Netherlands, The 
Low Countries, and The German Tradition. Evalua- 
tion is based upon a journal or research paper. 
There are no prerequisites. 

LTR 2 

A Sea-Going Seminar in the Bahamas 

Prof. Stanley Chesnut 

As the nearest foreign country open to Floridians, 
the beautiful island chain of the Bahamas offers 
unique opportunities for study and travel - by sea! 
This project Is designed as an introduction to the 
Bahamas, to seamanship and the sea, and to a 
special kind of cooperative living, all aboard a 
55-foot sailing yacht. The challenge offered to 
students in this experience is to encounter another 



culture; to learn something of sailing and the sea; 
and to develop a small, self-sufficient, and respons- 
ible community in which they may come to know 
themselves and others a little better. 

LTR 8 

Reviewing the Lively Arts [in London] 

Prof. Howard Carter 

This project has two aims: 1) the viewing of a wide 
range of plays, concerts, ballets, films, readings, 
exhibitions, and the like, in and around London, and 
2) the gaining of critical skills in discussing artistic 
merit orally and in written reviews. The group will 
see about a half dozen events in common; then go 
their separate ways. At regular class meetings, 
members will share and evaluate what each of us has 
learned about the different media involved - their 
traditions and craftsmanship. We will also be 
interested in questions of popular culture, satire, 
and arts management, and, where possible, we will 
have experts talk to us. 



ecu 1 

Introduction to Colombian Culture 

Prof. Frank Figueroa 

This is a study-travel project designed to give the 
participants an on-site introduction to the culture of 
the Colombian people. It will be located primarily in 
Bogota, the cultural and political capital of Colom- 
bia, with the facilities of the Centro Latino 
Americano of the Javeriana University at the dis- 
posal of students and faculty. There will be lectures 
and related group activities, and an opportunity to 
visit Barranquilla and Cartagena, located on the 
Caribbean coast of Colombia - areas of marked 
contrast to the Andean region of Bogota. 

ecu 5 

The Soviet Sense of the Past, the Present, and 

the Future 

Profs. William and Vivian Parsons 
This project confronts the student with Soviet life in 
the present, the Soviet consciousness of the past, 
and the Soviet plans for the future during a three- 
week study tour of the Soviet Union. Emphasis will 
be placed on present social and cultural institutions, 
the museums and historical monuments of Tsarist 
and Revolutionary Russia, and meetings with 
Russian young people, urban planners, and other 
Soviet designers of the future. A final week will be 
spent in Poland. The program will focus on the 
Russian Orthodox Church and Soviet Youth Pro- 
grams. Required reading will include one book and 
several articles. Evaluation will be based on partici- 



dh 



pation in group activities, and on a journal 
describing personal reactions to experiences in the 
Soviet Union. 
There are no prerequisites. 

NAS 4 

Science in America: Two Hundred Years of 

Development [Washington, D. C] 

Prof. Philip Ferguson 

This is a study of the development of science in the 
United States during the first two hundred years of 
the nation's existence. Each participant will investi- 
gate a scientific subject of his own choice, determin- 
ing the status of the subject at the time the nation 
was founded, and/or following its development 
during the ensuing 200 years. The student will be 
expected to present a paper outlining the import- 
ance of the development of his chosen scientific 
speciality in the development of the nation. 

NAS 10 

The Interaction of Science Technology and 

Socio-Economic Factors in England 

Prof. Billy Maddox 

This project, based in England, will study the inter- 
relationships of available scientific and mathemati- 
cal knowledge and the development of technology. 
Each student will study some specific technological 
or sociological development and the milieu in which 
it developed. The culmination of this study will be 
the presentation of a paper to the group. A series of 
lectures by the instructors and guest lecturers will be 
supplemented by visits to museums and laboratories 
of Cambridge University and other resources avail- 
able m the area. All participants will be expected to 
develop a reading list supportive of their study. 

Winter Term in Ireland 

CRA 7 The Arts in Ireland, Past and Present 
LTR 7 Pre-Historic and Celtic Ireland 
BES 7 Commerce and Industry in Ireland 

Profs, lames Crane, lames Matthews, and 
Marvin Bentley 

Together, these projects provide opportunity for a 
thoroughly interdisciplinary experience. A team of 
Eckerd College professors from diverse fields gives 
this trip to Ireland a considerable range of interest 
and sharp academic focus. Though each student will 
officially sign into one of the project groups, a good 
deal of the course will revolve around a common 
program. All groups will spend about ten days in 
Dublin. Then there will be a two-week tour to 
County Sligo, County Clare, and County Kerry to 
allow closer inspection of rural Ireland. The remain- 
ing time will be spent in Dublin, drawing together 
group and individual projects. 



CRA 7 

The Arts In Ireland, Past and Present 

Prof, lames Crane 

This project will explore the rich diversity of Irish art 
from early Celtic gold work and stone monuments to 
contemporary painting and sculpture, including 
visits to contemporary craftsmen working in the 
traditional crafts of weaving and ceramics. In 
addition to the journal required of all students in the 
team project, students will be expected to submit an 
in-depth study of some phase or aspect of Irish art. 
Creative projects may be substituted for the paper 
provided advance permission is given by the 
instructor on the basis of competency in the 
medium. 

LTR 7 

Pre-Historic and Celtic Ireland 

Prof, lames Matthews 

This project is primarily a venture in imaginative 
archaeology. The objectives are to encounter the 
impressive remains of Ireland's ancient Celtic past 
and then to attempt creative re-constructions of a 
few specific segments of that past. In addition to 
participation in the total team's activities, each 
student will be asked to submit a journal which 
assesses the readings and lectures, catalogues the 
data of on-site investigations, and attempts some- 
thing in the way of overall judgment or synthesis. 

BES 7 

Commerce and Industry in Ireland 

Prof. Marvin Bentley 

Using government documents, this group will first 
become familiar with such basic elements of the 
Irish national economy as tourism, agriculture, and 
banking. Then, the group will work directly with 
three Irish firms - an agricultural engineering firm, a 
land developing company, and a multinational oil 
company based in Ireland. Special attention will be 
given to comparisons between Irish and American 
business operations - management, financing, labor 
problems, etc. In addition to the requirements 
common to the entire team project, students in this 
group are required to make a study using a 
behavioral science approach of one aspect of Irish 
society. 



The preceding is not a complete list of Winter Term 
projects available, but of those being offered by 
Eckerd College Staff only. 



(7^ 



THE FACULTY 

OF ECKERD COLLEGE 



Foundations Collegium 
Faculty 

James H. Matthews 

Foundations Collegium Chairman 

Collegium of Letters 
Wilbur F. Block 

Collegium of Natural Sciences 
Richard R. Bredenberg 

Collegium of Creative Arts 
Nancy C. Carter 

Collegium of Letters 
Salvatore Capobianco 

Collegium of Natural Sciences 
Julienne H. Empric 

Collegium of Letters 
Irving G. Foster 

Collegium of Natural Sciences 
Gilbert L. Johnston 

Collegium of Comparative Cultures 
James M. MacDougall 

Collegium of Natural Sciences 
Charles M. Morrison, III 

Collegium of Creative Arts 
Anne A. Murphy 

Collegium of Behavioral Science 
Peter A. Pav 

Collegium of Letters 
Jack B.Williams 

Collegium of Behavioral Science 



Faculty of the Collegium 
of Creative Arts 

J. Thomas West 

Chairman, Creative Arts Collegium 

Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Davidson College 

M.A., University of North Carolina 

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 
Richard R. Bredenberg 

Director of Teacher Education 

Professor of Education 

A.B., Dartmouth College 

B.D., S.T.M., Oberlin College 

Ph.D., New York University 
James R. Carlson 

Director of the Eckerd College 
Theatre 

Professor of Theatre Arts 

A.B., Hamline University 

M.A., University of Minnesota 
James G. Crane 

Professor of Visual Arts 

A.B., Albion College 

M.A., State University of Iowa 

M.F.A., Michigan State University 
John K. Eckert 

Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., Eckerd College 

M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art 
Jerry H. Gill 

Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Westmont College 

M.A., University of Washington 

B.D., New York Theological 
Seminary 

Ph.D., Duke University 
James R. Harley 

Director of Athletics 

Associate Professor of Physical 
Education 

B.S., Georgia Teachers College 

M.A., George Peabody College 
Robert O. Hodgell 

Associate Professor of Art 

B.S., M.S., University of Wisconsin 
Richard B. Mathews 

Assistant Professor of Literature 

B.A., University of Florida 
University of Heidelberg 

Ph.D., University of Virginia 
J. Peter Meinke 

Director, Writers' Workshop 

Professor of Literature 

A.B., Hamilton College 

M.A., University of Michigan 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota 
Charles M. Morrison, III 

Assistant Professor of Theatre 

A.B., M.F.A., University of 
California, Los Angeles (UCLA) 



Molly K. Ransbury 

Assistant Professor of Education 
B.S., M.S., State University of 
New York 
Ed.D., Indiana University 

Margaret R. Rigg 
Associate Professor of Visual Arts 
A.B., Florida State University 
M.A., Presbyterian School of 
Christian Education, Richmond 

Alma L. Seniors 
Assistant Professor of Education 
B.S., Tuskegee Institute 
M.A., Atlanta University 
M.S., University of South Florida 
Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Shirley A. Smith 
Assistant Professor of Music 
B.Mus., Oberlin College 
M.Mus., Syracuse University 

Henri Ann Taylor 

Director of Campus Intramurals 
and Recreation 
Assistant Professor of Physical 

Education 
A.B., Howard College 
M.A., University of Alabama 

William E. Waters 
Professor of Music 
A.B., University of North Carolina 
M.A., College of William and Mary 



(n) 



Faculty of the 
Collegium of Letters 

Keith W. Irwin 

Chairman, Collegium of Letters 
Professor of Pfiilosophy 
A.B., Cornell College 
M.Div., Garrett Theological 

Seminary 
BurrC. Brundage 
Professor of History 
A.B., Amherst College 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 
Albert Howard Carter, III 
Assistant Professor of Comparative 

Literature and Humanities 
A.B., University of Chicago 
M.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Iowa 
). Stanley Chesnut 

Professor of Humanities and 

Religion 

B.A., University of Tulsa 
M.Div., McCormick Theological 

Seminary 
M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 
julienne H. Empric 
Assistant Professor of Literature 
B.A., Nazareth College of 

Rochester 
M.A., York University 
Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 
Rejane P. Genz 
Professor of Frencti Language and 

Literature 
A.B., Sillery College, Quebec City 
License es lettres, Ph.D., Laval 

University 
William F. McKee 
Professor of History 
B.A., College of Wooster 
M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Wisconsin 
James H. Matthews 
Associate Professor of Literature 
B.A., Seattle Pacific College 
M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
Peter A. Pav 
Associate Professor of Philosophy 
B.A., Knox College 
M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University 

Prof. 
Felix Rackow 
Professor of Political Science, Pre- 

Law Adviser 
B.S.,M.A., Ph.D., Cornell 

University 
William C. Wilbur 

Professor of British and Modern 

European History 
A.B., Washington and Lee 

University 
Ph.D., Columbia University 



Faculty of the Collegium of 
Comparative Cultures 

Kenneth E. Keeton 

Chairman, Collegium of 

Comparative Cultures 
Professor of German Language and 

Literature 
A.B., Georgetown College 
M.A., University of Kentucky 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
Alan W. Carlsten 
Professor of Religion 
B.S., University of Oklahoma 
M.Div., McCormick Theological 

Seminary 
Peter W. Chang 
Assistant Professor of Chinese 

Language and Culture 
B.A., Taiwan University 
M.S., University of North Carolina 
Tennyson P. Chang 

Professor of Asian Studies 
B.A., University of Southern 

California 
M.A., Columbia University 
Ph.D., Georgetown University 

(Washington) 
Dudley E. DeGroot 

Professor of Anthropology 
B.A., University of West Virginia 
M.A., University of New Mexico 
Ph.D., Ohio State University 
Frank M. Figueroa 

Professor of Spanish and Hispanic 

Area Studies 

B.S., Seton Hall University 
M.A., Ed.D., Columbia University 

Teachers College 
Henry E. Genz 
Professor of French Language and 

Literature 
A.B., Emory University 
M.A., University of Wisconsin 
Ph.D., Western Reserve University 
E. Ashby Johnson 

Professor of Philosophy and 

Religion 
A.B., Presbyterian College, South 

Carolina 
B.D.,Th.M.,Th.D., Union 

Theological Seminary, Virginia 
Gilbert L. Johnston 
Associate Professor of Religion 
B.A., Cornell University 
M.Div., Princeton Theological 

Seminary 
Ph.D., Harvard University 



Mary C. Paidosh 

Assistant Professor of German 

Area Studies 
B.A., M.A., University of 

Minnesota 

Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 
Vivian A. Parsons 
Instructor in Russian 
A.B., Brandeis University 
M.A.T., Harvard University 
William H. Parsons 
Associate Professor of History and 

Russian Studies 
A.B., Grinnell College 
A.M., Harvard University 
Ph.D., Indiana University 
Pedro N. Trakas 
Professor of Spanish 
A.B.,Wofford College 
M.A., Universidad Nacional de 

Mexico 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
Litt.D.,Wofford College 



^ 



Faculty of the Collegium of 
Behavioral Science 

J. Marvin Bentley 

Chairman, Behavioral Science 
Collegium 
Associate Professor of Economics 
B.A., Davidson College 
Ph.D., Tulane University 

Joan A. Barnett 
Assistant Professor of Anthropology 
B.A., University of Pennsylvania 
M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University 

Joncker R.' Ibn Biandudi 
Assistant Professor of Afro- 
American Studies 
B.A., Sioux Falls College 
M.A., Howard University 

Theodore M. Dembroski 
Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.S., Ph.D., University of Houston 

Timothy R. Gamelin 
Associate Professor of International 
Politics 

B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College 
M.A., Ph.D., Duke University 

Wesley E. Harper 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Harvard University 
Ph.D., Stanford University 

William C. Martin 
Associate Professor of Sociology 
B.A., University of Redlands 
M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Southern California 

Anne A. Murphy 
Associate Professor of American 
Political Behavior 
B.A., College of Wooster 
B.D., Yale Divinity School 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Tom Oberhofer 
Assistant Professor of Economics 
B.S., Fordham University 
M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers University 

Jack B.Williams 
Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A., University of South Florida 
M.A.andPh.D, Vanderbilt 
University 

Sandra H. Wilson 
Assistant Professor of Management 
A.B., Florida A and M University 
M.Ed., Ohio University 
Ph.D., University of South Florida 



Faculty of the Collegium 
of Natural Sciences 

Richard W. Neithamer 

Chairman, Collegium of Natural 
Sciences 

Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., Allegheny College 
Ph.D., Indiana University 

Wilbur F. Block 
Associate Professor of Physics 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of 
Florida 

Salvatore Capobianco 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A., M.A., University of Kansas 
Ph.D., Rutgers University 

Joan T. D'Agostino 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
A.B., Rutgers University 
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

John C. Ferguson 
Professor of Biology 
A.B., Duke University 
M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Philip R. Ferguson 
Professor of Chemistry 
A.B., M.A., Indiana University 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Irving G. Foster 
Professor of Physics 
B.S., Virginia Military Institute 
Ph.M., University of Wisconsin 
Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Carol A. Jefferson 
Assistant Professor of Botany 
B.A., St. Olaf College 
Ph.D., Oregon State University 

George W. Lofquist 

Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., University of North Carolina 
M.S., Ph.D., Louisiana State 
University 

James M. MacDougall 
Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.S., Highlands University, New 
Mexico 
M.A., Ph.D., Kansas State 
University 

Billy H. Maddox 
Professor of Mathematics 
B . S . , Troy State Col lege 
M.Ed., University of Florida 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Robert C. Meacham 
Professor of Mathematics 
A.B., Southwestern at Memphis 
Sc.M., Ph.D., Brown University 



George K. Reid 

Professor of Biology 
B.S., Presbyterian College, South 
Carolina 
M.S., Ph.D., University of Florida 
William B. Roess 
Professor of Biology 
B.S., Blackburn College 
Ph.D., Florida State University 



(^ 



ADMINISTRATION 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 

Billy O. Wireman 

President of the College 
A.B., Georgetown College 
M.A., University of Kentucky 
Ed.D., George Peabody College 
Marjorie R. Nincehelser 
Administrative Secretary 

OFFICE OF THE PROVOST 

Richard Ray Hallin 

Provost 

Dean of Faculty 
B.A., Occidental College 
B.A., M.A., Exeter College, Oxford 
University, England 
Ph.D., Columbia University 

EMERITUS 
Emil Kauder 

Professor £mer/tus of Economics 
Ph.D., University of Berlin 

Dudley E. South 
Professor Emeritus of Mattiematics 
A . B . , Wooster Col lege 
M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Michigan 

Frances M. Whitaker 
Registrar Emeritus 
M.A., Columbia University 

Daniel A. Zaret 
Professor Emeritus of Russian 
Ph.D., University of Moscow 

STAFF 

A. Jack Bazemore 

Director of Financial Aid 

M.B.A., Georgia State University 
Clark H. Bouwman 

Dean of Admissions 

Director of Off-Campus Study 
and International Education 

Ph.D., New School for Social 
Research 
Wanda ). Calhoun 

Head Librarian 

A.M.L.S., University of Michigan 
Nancy C. Carter 

Director of the Learning Resources 
Center 

Ph.D., University of Iowa 
Ofelia E. Garcia 

Admissions Counselor 

M.A., University of Michigan 
David W. Henderson 

Readers' Services Librarian 

A.M.L.S., Florida State University 
Richard D. Huss 

Admissions Counselor 

M.A., George Peabody College 



Christine H. Johnson 

Admissions Counselor 

B.S., University of New Hampshire 
Marjorie Leap Ruth 

Admissions counselor 

B.A., Dickinson College 
Joanne J. Lofquist 

Technical Services Librarian 

S.M.L.S., University of North 
Carolina 
Cloyd H. McClung 

Reference Librarian 

A.M.L.S., Florida State University 
Moses Stith 

Director of Campus Ministry 

M.Div., Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary 
Ruth R. Trigg 

Registrar 

B.A., University of Kentucky 
Phyllis T. Zarek 

Assistant to the Librarian for 
Acquisitions 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 
James R. Harley 

Director of Athletics 
M.A., George Peabody College 
William Livesey 

Assistant Professor of Physical 

Education 
B.S., University of Maine 

OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT 
AND COLLEGE RELATIONS 
Robert B. Stewart 

Vice President for Development 
and College Relations 

A.B., Rollins College 
Christine B. Buhrman 

Associate Director, Development 

M.M., Florida State University 
Wayne W. Hoffmann 

Associate Director, Development 

Ed.D., Indiana University 
David M. Rankin 

Associate Vice President for 
Development 

B.A., Eckerd College 
Betty Ray 

Director of Public Information 

A.B., Wesleyan College 

OFFICE OF STUDENT AFFAIRS 
Sharon M. Covert 

Coordinator of Career 

Development Services 
B.A., Florida Presbyterian College 



William C. Covert 

Director of Waterfront Activities, 

ARC Instructor 
A. A., St. Petersburg Junior College 
Sarah K. Dean 

Vice President and Dean of Student 

Affairs 
M.Re., Southern Baptist 
Theological Seminary 
M.A., George Peabody College 
Stephanie A. Deverick 

Director of Health Services 
M.D., Virginia University School of 
Medicine 
Barbara J. Ely 
Director of Nursing Services 
R.N., White Cross Hospital 
Mary Louise Jones 
Night Nurse 

R.N., Grady Memorial Hospital 
Joan Q. Minnis 

Part/Time Counselor in Residence 
M.A., Howard University 
Maria Santa-Maria 
Associate Director of Career & 
Personal Counseling Center and 
Psychologist 
M.A., Ohio State University 
William E. Savage 

Dean of Residential Affairs 
D.Mn., University of Chicago 
Henri Ann Taylor 
Director of Campus Intramurals 

and Recreation 
M.A., University of Alabama 
Harold L. Wahking 
Director of Career & Personal 
Counseling Center and Assistant 
Professor 
M.A., University of Louisville 
D.Min., New Orleans Theological 
Seminary 

OFFICE OF BUSINESS AFFAIRS 
John D. Phillips 

Vice President for Business Affairs 

M.Ed., University of Florida 
Charles F. Gibbs 

Manager, Purchasing Manager, 
College Store 

A.B., New York University 
William A. Hofacker 

Director, Physical Plant 

B.S., University of Illinois 
Leslie R. Smout 

Comptroller 

B.A., University of South Florida 



(Ml 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Mr. Robert T. Sheen 

Chairman 
The Rev. Clem E. Bininger, D.D. 

Vice Chairman 
Oscar Kreutz 

Treasurer 
Mr. Garnette J. Stollings 

Assistant Treasurer 
Mr. Williard A. Gortner 

Secretary 
Mrs. Marjorie R. Nincehelser 

Assistant Secretary 



The Rev. Harvard A. Anderson, D.D. 

Chairman, Review and Evaluation 
Unit 

General Assembly 

Presbyterian Church in the U.S. 

Atlanta, Georgia 
The Rev. Robert C. Asmuth 

Pastor 

First Presbyterian Church 

Fort Myers, Florida 
Mr. W. D. Bach 

Pensacola, Florida 
Mr. William M. Bateman 

Securities Broker - Vice Pres. 

Hornblower & Weeks - Hemphill, 
Noyes, Inc. 

Palm Beach, Florida 
Mr. Joseph A. Benner, Jr. 

Stephen A. Calder Enterprises 

Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 
The Rev. Clem E. Bininger, D.D., 

L.H.D. 

Pastor 

First Presbyterian Church 

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 
Mr. Scott Brownell 

Bradenton, Florida 
The Hon. Lawton M. Chiles 

United States Senator 

Lakeland, Florida 
Mrs. Lawrence C. Clark 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Charles Creighton 

President 

Creighton's Restaurants 

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 
Mr. Jack M. Eckerd 

Chairman of the Board 

Jack Eckerd Corp. 

Clearwater, Florida 
The Rev. Paul M. Edris, D.D. 

Pastor 

First Presbyterian Church 

Daytona Beach, Florida 



The Rev. Irvin Elligan, Jr. 

Pastor 

New Covenant Presbyterian Church 

Miami, Florida 
Mr. J. Colin English 

Chairman of the Board 

Edinburgh Investment Corp. 

Tallahassee, Florida 
The Rev. Pinckney C. Enniss, Jr. 

Pastor 

First Presbyterian Church 

Tallahassee, Florida 
Mrs. Mildred Ferris 

St. Petersburg Beach, Florida 
Mr. H. D. Frueauff, Jr. 

President 

Tool Engineering Service 

Tallahassee, Florida 
The Rev. T. Robert Fulton, D.D. 

South Jacksonville Presbyterian 
Church 

Jacksonville, Florida 
Mr. John Michael Garner 

President 

First State Bank in Miami 

Miami, Florida 
Mr. Willard A. Gortner 

Vice President 

Harris Upham and Co. Inc. 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Senator Ben Hill Griffin, Jr. 

President 

Ben Hill Griffin, Inc. 

Frostproof, Florida 
Dr. Sarah Louise Halmi 

Clearwater, Florida 
Mrs. Lorena C. Hannahs 

Redington Beach, Florida 
The Rev. Lacy R. Harwell 

Pastor 

Maximo Presbyterian Church 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Frank M. Hubbard 
Chairman of the Board 

Hubbard Construction Co. 

Orlando, Florida 
Mrs. Stephen R. Kirby 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Oscar R. Kreutz 

Chairman Emeritus and Consultant 

Florida Federal Savings and Loan 
Assn. 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. E. Colin Lindsey 

Executive Vice President 

Belk-Lindsey Stores, Inc. 

Tampa, Florida 



The Rev. Seth C. Morrow, D.D. 

Pastor 

First Presbyterian Church 

Delray Beach, Florida 
Mr. Howard W. Nix, Jr. 

President 

Landmark Union Trust Bank 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. William F. O'Neill 

Chairman of the Board 

Tampa Bay Engineering Co. 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Dr. Benjamin L. Perry, Jr. 

President 

Florida Agricultural and 
Mechanical University 

Tallahassee, Florida 
Mr. Harry M. Piper, CLU 

Piper and Associates 

Seminole, Florida 
The Rev. Arnold B. Poole, D.D. 

Pastor 

Pine Shores Presbyterian Church 

Sarasota, Florida 
Mrs. Woodbury Ransom 

Charlevoix, Michigan 
Mr. George Ruppel, 

Vice Pres. & Secretary 

Modern Tool & Die Co. of 
Florida 

Pinellas Park, Florida 
Mr. Robert T. Sheen 

Chairman, Executive Committee 

Milton Roy Company 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mrs. John W.Sterchi 

Orlando, Florida 
Mr. Garnette J. Stollings 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. William W. Upham 

The Upham Agency 

St. Petersburg Beach, Florida 
Mr. James W. Walter 

Chairman of the Board 

Jim Walter Corp. 

Tampa, Florida 
Mr. David L. Wilt 

Wilt and Associates 

Arlington, Virginia 



(S) 



HONORARY 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Dr. Gordon W. Blackwell 

President 

Furman University 

Greenville, South Carolina 
Mr. Charles J. Bradshaw 

Miami Shores, Florida 
Mr. Cecil V. Butler 

President 

C. V. Butler Farms 

Havana, Florida 
Mr. |. Leo Chapman 

Attorney 

West Palm Beach, Florida 
The Rev. Roy B. Connor, Jr., D.D. 

Pompano Beach, Florida 
The Rev. John B. Dickson, D.D. 

Clearwater, Florida 
Mrs. J. Morton Douglas 

Weirsdale, Florida 
Mrs. Charles G. Gambrell 

New York, New York 
The Rev. Jack G. Hand, D.D. 

Pastor 

The Palms Presbyterian Church 

Jacksonville Beach, Florida 
Dr. W. Monte Johnson 

Lakeland, Florida 
Dr. William H.Kadel 

President 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Mr. Elwyn L. Middleton 

Attorney 

Palm Beach, Florida 
Mr. Benjamin G. Parks 

Attorney 

Naples, Florida 
Dr. J. WayneReitz 

Gainesville, Florida 
The Rev. Richard L. Scoggins, D.D. 

Pastor 

Wallace Memorial Presbyterian 
Church 

Panama City, Florida 
Mr. Robert V.Walker 

President 

First Federal Savings and Loan 
Assn. 

Miami, Florida 



BOARD OF VISITORS 

Eckerd College's Board of Visitors is comprised of people who have 
distinguished themselves through significant contributions to our society. The 
Board works with the president on questions of national significance facing 
American higher education generally and the private, church-related college 
specifically. 

Mr. Leslie R. Severinghaus, Headmaster Emeritus of Haverford School, 
Haverford, Pennsylvania, serves as chairman of the Board of Visitors. The 
Board meets annually on campus. 



Mr. Arthur C.Allyn, Jr. 

A.C. Allyn&Co. 

Sarasota, Florida 
The Hon. William B. Buffum 

U.S. Ambassador to Lebanon 

Beirut, Lebanon 
Dr. Howard Chadwick 

Pastor 

First Presbyterian Church 

Orlando, Florida 
Mr. William H. Cornog 

Superintendent 

New Trier East High School 

Winnetka, Illinois 
Mr. Neil O. Davis 

Editor and Publisher 

Tlie Auburn Bulletin 

Auburn, Alabama 
Mr. Richard W. Day 

Principal 

The Montclair Kimberley Academy 

Montclair, New Jersey 
Dr. Theodore A. Distler 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania 
Mr. Charles Gordon Dobbins 

Washington, D.C. 
Mr. John W. Douglas 

Attorney 

Washington, D.C. 
Mr. J. Wayne Fredericks 

Ford Motor Company 

New York, New York 
Mr. Herman W. Goldner 

Attorney 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Dr. Samuel B. Gould 

Sarasota, Florida 
Mrs. Mary N. Hilton 

Deputy Director, Women's Bureau 

U.S. Department of Labor 

Washington, D.C. 
Mrs. Charlotte M. Hubbard 

Washington, D.C. 
Dr. John H. Jacobson 

Vice Pres. Academic Affairs 

Empire State College 

Saratoga Springs, New York 



Dr. Kenneth Keniston 

School of Medicine 

Yale University 

New Haven, Connecticut 
Dr. George K. Makechnie 

Dean Emeritus 

Boston University 

Lexington, Massachusetts 
Colonel Francis Pickens Miller 

Government Service, Writer 

Washington, D.C. 
Mrs. Helen Hill Miller 

Economist, Writer 

Washington, D.C. 
Sister Rita Mudd 

National Conference of Bishops 

Washington, D.C. 
Mr. Henry Owen 

The Brookings Institution 

Washington, D.C. 
The Hon. Luther I. Replogle 

Chicago, Illinois 
Dr. J. McDowell Rhchards 

Columbia Theological Seminary 

Decatur, Georgia 
Dr. Lindon E. Saline 

Management Development 
Institute 

General Electric Co. 

Ossining, New York 
Mr. David R. Satin 

The Harvest Organization 

Coral Gables, Florida 
Mr. Leslie R. Severinghaus 

Coconut Grove, Florida 
Dr. David W. Sprunt 

Chaplain 

Washington and Lee University 

Lexington, Virginia 
Dr. John Randolph Taylor 

Central Presbyterian Church 

Atlanta, Georgia 
Dr. James C. Thomson, Jr. 

Harvard University 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 
Dr. Harold Blake Walker 

Evanston, Illinois 
Mr. Haskell Ward 

Ford Foundation 

International Division 

New York, New York 



^ 



PRESIDENT'S ROUNDTABLE 



The President's Roundtable, a select group of young Florida business and 
civic leaders, meets twice a year for an in-depth look at the complexities of 
higher education, and provides college officials with capable advice on matters 
of common interest. 



Mr. George J. Albright, )r. 

Albright Realty 

Oklawaha, Florida 
Mrs. Upham Allen 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mrs. William C. Ballard 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. David E. Becker 

Vice President 

Smith, Barney and Co., Inc. 

Tampa, Florida 
Mr. Joseph A. Benner, Jr. 

Stephen A. Calder Enterprises 

Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 
The Rev. Mrs. Betty L. Blanton 

Trinity Presbyterian Church 

Jacksonville, Florida 
Mr. Jay D. Bond, Jr. 

Attorney 

Daytona Beach, Florida 
Mr. R. William Bramberg, Jr. 

President 

Suncoast Investments 

New Port Richey, Florida 
Mr. William D. Callaghan, Jr. 

Western Reserve Life Assurance Co. 

Clearwater, Florida 
Mr. Carey F. Carlton 

Carlton Cattle Co. 

Sebring, Florida 
Mr. W. Don Carr 

Senior Vice President 

Florida Federal Savings and Loan 
Assn. 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Lawrence C. Clark 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Donald R. Crane, Jr. 

Vice President 

Nabers, Crane & Siver, Inc. 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. E. Earl Donaldson 

Tampa, Florida 
Mr. J. Colin English, Jr. 

Edinburgh Investment Corp. 

Tallahassee, Florida 
Mr. John C. Evans 

Project Engineer 

Tampa Bay Engineering Co. 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Kim Evans 

Maitland, Florida 



Mr. Gary Froid, CLU 

Northwestern Mutual Life 
Insurance Co. 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Alan D. Galletly 

Vice President Marketing 

C. Randolph Wedding, A. I. A. 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. John Michael Garner 

President 

First State Bank of Miami 

Miami, Florida 
Mr. Rex L. Gay 

Vice President 

Freedom Federal Savings & Loan 
of Tampa 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. John E. Grady, Jr. 

Vice President 

Suncoast Highland Corp. 

Clearwater, Florida 
The Hon. D. Robert Graham 

Vice President 

Sengra Development Corp. 

State Senator, 33rd District 

Miami Lakes, Florida 
Mr. John L. Green, Jr. 

Attorney 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Robert J. Haiman 

Managing Editor 

St. Petersburg Times 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Clifford M. Hames 

Senior Vice President and Trust 
Officer 

Sun First National Bank at 
Orlando 

Orlando, Florida 
Mr. L. Edwin Hardman 

Vice President 

Marine Bank and Trust Co. 

Tampa, Florida 
Mrs. Carleen V. Haskell 

Executive Director 

The Shorecrest School 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. James William Heavener 

Vice President 

Barnett Winston Mortgage Co. 

Tampa, Florida 



Mr. Robert G. Holmes, Jr. 

President 

Aero Systems, Inc. 

Miami, Florida 
The Reverend Samuel Houck 

Regional Communications 
Executive 

Presbyterian Church in the U.S. 

Jacksonville, Florida 
Mr. Thomas A. James 

Raymond, James & Associates, Inc. 

Seminole, Fla. 
Judge Richard B. Keating 

Orlando, Florida 
Mr. Harold K. Kelley 

President 

Barnett Bank of St. Petersburg 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. James T. Lang 

Certified Public Accountant 

Tornwall, Lang & Lee 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Victor P. Leavengood 

Secretary and Treasurer 

General Telephone Co. 

Tampa, Florida 
Mrs. Helen K. Leslie 

Executive Vice President 

K & W Supply House, Inc. 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Scott Lorraine 

President 

Tampa Bay Engineering Co. 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Judge Robert Michael 

Circuit judge 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Neville D. Miller 

President 

Community Bank of St. Petersburg 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Robert C. Moss 

Naples, Florida 
Judge Emery J. Newell 

Juvenile and Domestic Relations 
Court 

West Palm Beach, Florida 
Dr. James Y. O'Bannon, Jr. 

West Palm Beach, Florida 



(Ml 



Mr. L. Eugene Oliver, Jr. 

President 

Bank of Florida 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Albert C. O'Neill, Jr. 

Attorney 

Tampa, Florida 
Mr. J. Ross Parker 

President 

Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. 

Tampa, Florida 
Mr. Harry M. Piper, CLU 

Piper and Associates 

Seminole , Florida 
Mrs. Marion Poynter 

journalist 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Eugene D. Ruffier 

Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner& 
Smith, inc. 

Orlando, Florida 
Mrs. Florence Ryan 

DECEASED 
Dr. Robert E. Stewart 

Physician 

Huntsville, Alabama 
Mr. Justice Alan C. Sundberg 

Member, Supreme Court 
State of Florida 

Tallahassee, Florida 
Mr. Frederick A. Teed 

£xecut/ve Vice President 

Community Federal Savings and 
Loan Assn. 

Riviera Beach, Florida 
Mrs. Ruth Fleet Thurman 

Attorney 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. David Tudeen 

Architect 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Stewart Turley 

President 

Jack Eckerd Corporation 

Clearwater, Florida 



Mr. Robert G. Wagner 

President 

First National Bank of Seminole 

Seminole, Florida 
Mr. William P. Wallace 

President 

Bennett, Wallace, Welch and 
Green Insurance Co. 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
The Hon. John T. Ware 

Attorney 

State Senator, 18th District 
St. Petersburg, Florida 
Dr. H. D. Williams 

Richey Medical Center 

New Port Richey, Florida 



(S) 



CALENDAR OF EVENTS 1975-76 



August 22 Freshmen arrive and register before 3:00 p.m. 

August 23 Autumn Term classes begin. 

September 11 Residence houses open to upperclassmen at 8:00 a.m. 

September 12 Registration for fall and winter term, all students; Autumn Term ends at 4:30 p.m. 

September 13 Reexaminations and Independent Study examinations. 

September 15 Module 1 begins at 8:00 a.m. 

September 17 Convocation. 

September 19 Last day to enter classes, end of drop/add period for Module 1 and fall term. 

October 30 Module 1 ends at 4:30 p.m. . 

November 3 Module 2 begins at 8:00 a.m. 

November 7 Last day to enter classes, end of drop/add period for Module 2. 

November 12-13 Meeting of Board of Trustees. 

November 19-21 Registration for spring term. 

November 27-28 Thanksgiving holiday; no classes. 

December 19 Module 2 ends and Christmas recess begins at4:30 p.m. 

December 20 Residence houses close at 10:00 a.m. 

January 4 Residence houses reopen at 9:00 a.m. 

January 5 Winter Term begins at 8:00 a.m. All projects meet. 

January 6 Last day to enter Winter Term, end of drop/add period. 

January 29-30 First comprehensive examination period. 

January 30 Winter Term ends. 

February 3 Module 3 begins at 8:00 a.m. 

February 9 Last day to enter classes, end of drop/add period for Module 3 and spring term. 

March 19 Module 3 ends and spring recess begins at 4:30 p.m. 

March 20 Residence houses close at 10:00 a.m. 

March 29 Residence houses reopen at 9:00 a.m. 

March 30 Module 4 begins at 8:00 a.m. 

April 5 Last day to enter classes, end of drop/add period for Module 4. 

April 7-9 Second comprehensive examination period. 

April 14-15 Meeting of Board of Trustees. 

April 16 Good Friday; no classes. 

April 22 Mentor conferences and contracts for 1976-77; no classes. 

April 22-26 Registration for fall and winter terms, 1976-77. 

April 16-19, 23-26 Festival of the Arts. 

May 20 Module 4 ends at 4:30 p.m. 

May 23 Baccalaureate-Commencement. 

May 24 Residence houses close at 10:00 a.m. 

Registration for Summer Module. 

June 11 - July 30 Summer Module 




CALENDAR OF EVENTS 1976-77 



August 20 
August 21 
September 9 
September 10 
September 11 
September 13 
September 15 
September 17 
October 28 
November 1 
November 5 
November 10-11 
November 17-19 
November 25-26 
December 17 
December 18 
January 2 
January 3 
January 4 
January 27-28 
January 28 
February 1 
February 7 
March 18 
March 19 
March 28 
March 29 



14 

15-7 

18 

I 13-14 

118 

I 19-21 

1 15-18, 22-25 



Apr 

Apr 

Apr 

Apr 

Apr 

Apr 

Apr 

May 19 

May 22 

May 23 

June 10 -July 29 



Freshmen arrive and register before 3:00 p.m. 

Autumn term classes begin. 

Residence houses open to upperclassmen at 8:00 a.m. 

Registration for fall and winter term, all students; autumn term ends at 4:30 p.m. 

Reexaminations and Independent Study examinations. 

Module 1 begins at 8:00 a.m. 

Convocation. 

Last day to enter classes, end of drop/add period for Module 1 and fall term. 

Module 1 ends at 4:30 p.m. 

Module 2 begins at 8:00 a.m. 

Last day to enter classes, end of drop/add period for Module 2. 

Meeting of Board of Trustees. 

Registration for spring term. 

Thanksgiving holiday; no classes. 

Module 2 ends and Christmas recess begins at4:30 p.m. 

Residence houses close at 10:00 a.m. 

Residence houses reopen at 9:00 a.m. 

Winter term begins at 8:00 a.m. All projects meet. 

Last day to enter winter term, end of drop/add period. 

First comprehensive examination period. 

Winter term ends. 

Module 3 begins at 8:00 a.m. 

Last day to enter classes, end of drop/add period for Module 3 and spring term. 

Module 3 ends and spring recess begins at 4:30 p.m. 

Residence houses close at 10:00 a.m. 

Residence houses reopen at 9:00 a.m. 

Module 4 begins at8:00 a.m. 

Last day to enter classes, end of drop/add period for Module 4. 

Second comprehensive examination period. 

Good Friday; no classes. 

Meeting of Board of Trustees. 

Mentor conferences and contracts for 1977-78; no classes. 

Registration for fall and winter terms, 1977-78. 

Festival of Arts. 

Module 4 ends at 4:30 p.m. 

Baccalaureate-Commencement. 

Residence houses close at 10:00 a.m. 

Registration for Summer Module. 

Summer Module. 




!"*«««««.' 




THE ECKERD COLLEGE CAMPUS 

1. Upham Administration Building 

2. Ben Hill Griffin Chapel 

3. Lewis House 

4. Physical Plant 

5. Frances and Bivian McArthur 
Physical Education Center 

6. Psychology Laboratory 

7. F. Page Seibert 
Humanities Building 

8. Forrer Language Center 

9. Robert T. Sheen Science Center 

10. Dendy-McNair Auditorium 

11. William Luther Cobb Library 

12. R. W. and Helen Roberts 
Music Center 

13. Christiana and Woodbury Ransom 
Visual Arts Center 



14. Bininger Center 
for Performing Arts 

15. Boat House 

16. Edmundson Hall 

17. Brown Hall 

18. Lindsey Hail 

19. Fox Hall 

20. Webb Health Center 

21. Student Cafeteria 

22. Alpha Residence Cluster 

23. Beta Residence Cluster 

24. Gamma Residence Cluster 

25. Delta Residence Cluster 

26. Epsilon Residence Cluster 

27. Zeta Residence Cluster 

28. Kappa Residence Cluster 

29. Tennis Court 



(Bayway) 54th AVENUE SOUTH 



McArthu 




eCKGRD COLL€G€ 

FOUNDED AS 
FLORIDA PRESBYTIRIAN COLLEGE 



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eCKGRD coLLece 

St. Petersburg, Florida 33733 
Telephone (813) 867-1166